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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

Town of Wilmington, Massociiusetts 



ANNUAL 
REPORT 



1974 



11 



THE WILMINGTON RESOLVES 




)n-Je^-^ '-.>^-^ ^'^1;^: 



"^cxa:;:,:^::? ' "-^ '^'^""-^'■^ ^-^^^ ^ 



Leslie A. Durkee 
Anton V. Thiel 



Index 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 70 

Beautification Committee 19 

Bicentermial Commdssion 33 

Board of Appeals 60 

Board of Assessors 10 

Board of Health 39 

Board of Registrars Ili 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Boards, Committees, & Commissions 7 

Building Inspector 32 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecttire Fund 14.3 

Cemetery Department 52 

Conservation Commission 

Constable 9 

Coimoil on Aging 69 

Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 23 

Fire Department 31 

Highway Department 36 

Historical Commission 51 

Housing Authority 33 

Jury List 56 

Librarian 26 

Library Trustees 2U 

Peimanent Building Committee 2i; 

Planning Board 20 

Police Department 28 

Public Buildings Department i|2 

Recreation Commission )|) | 

Redevelopment Authority 53 

School Committee 78 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 27 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 87 

Solid Waste Disposal 68 

Superintendent of Schools 83 

Town Accountant 126 

Town Clerk 12 

Town Collector I5 

Town Counsel 16 

Town Engineer 3I1 

Town Manager il 

Town Meetings & Elections Anniial Town Meeting - March 2, I97I4. 92 

Special Town Meeting - August 26, I97U 115 

State Primary - September 10, 1971+ II8 

State Election - November 5, 197U 120 

Town Treas\irer 11 

Tree Department 35 

Veterans Agent 59 

Water & Sewer Department I4.8 



1 



Selectmen Michael A. Caira, Selectman George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 
of the Board James R. Miceli, Selectman James F. Banda, and Selectman 
A. Daniel Gillis. 




Wilmington Board of Selectmen conducting a hearing in the Town Hall. 



2 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 



During the past year we were very fortimate to have had a reduction in our 
tax rate. However, unless we continue to give every Town Meeting expen- 
diture our careful consideration, we may he faced with a dramatic increase 
on our next tax bill. Now, more than ever hefore, we must assign eveiy 
project a place on a priority list and vote for it only if it is necessary 
for the well-being of the entire community. 

The Board of Selectmen in serving you have emphasized responsible, respon- 
sive government. In working with other departments, we have completed 
many projects to make our streets safer for pedestrian travel; namely, 
updating of street li^ts and completion of drainage projects. We will 
present at this Annual Town Meeting a comprehensive solid waste programm 
a town forest project, and an expansion of our sidewalk program. Even 
in this time of recession, our Town has had industrial growth. While 
most of our surrounding communities have ground to a screeching halt, we 
were able to add approximately three million dollars of new industrial 
valuation. 



We, your elected officials, stand ready to serve you and look forward to 
hearing from you. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James R. Miceli, Chairman 
James F. Banda 
George W. Boylen, Jr. 
Michael A. Caira 
A. Daniel Gillis 



TOWIV OF WlLMIIsrOTOlV 

MASSACHUSETTS 01887 



OFFICEOFTHt „ 

AREA COOC 617 

rOWN MANAGER 658-3311 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

We have completed the calendar year 197U and herewith, report on the activities 
of the government. The financial year, however, is still in progress, having 
commenced on July 1, ^^^k^ and will end on June 30, 1975. For financial 
acco^lntability the year is split over two calendar years. The financial sta- 
tistics in this report cover the period January of 1973 through June of 197U. 

The economy is the engine of this society, but we in local governmental units 
are the passengers on the train. We attempt to influence the speed of the 
train and to some extent the destination. 

The Town, in order to add its influence to the direction of the economy as it 
pertained to our needs, our local specifications, has employed over the past 
few months of 197U a person whose job is to coordinate a local effort to 
assess o\ir needs and to find money resources on the State and Federal level 
to assist Wilmington in obtaining our share of the tax dollars that can be 
used, we believe, better at the local level of government to support the 
local economy. The position of Assistant Town Manager has been that local 
influence and will prove helpful. 

We also undertook in mid-197U to enhance oiir physical environment in order 
to cope with the commTinity's urbaji growth by creating the position of Town 
Engineer to adeqixately control the quality of life factor which is primarily 
man-made. The work load consists of the proper layout of residential and 
industrial subdivisions such as Glen Acres Estates, Juniper Ridge, Lucaya 
Estates, Jonspin Road, Elmwood Village, North Wilmington Industrial Park, 
and other projects concerning the design and construction plans for side- 
walks, drainage programs, street layouts and related engineering projects. 
The need is now being successfully fulfilled. 

The availability and procurement of federal funds during 197U helped also 
to a considerable degree to keep the lid on the tax rate. I hasten to add 
that wise and timely investment of idle funds by the Town Treasurer was a 
deciding factor. In the previous ei^teen months' fiscal period, the 
Wilmington Treasury had earnings from idle funds of $63,3U3.00 from revenue 
sharing funds and $81^,951 .00 from non- revenue sharing ftinds, or a total of 
$1il7.29i|.00 earned for the purpose of preventing the assessment of funds 
from property tsLxes. 



During 197U» the Town authorized the Water Commissioners to make in^irovements 
to the water distribution system in the northeast sector of Wilmington. The 
project will influence future industrial growth in this area. The precise 
location of the water mains has been determined over the past few months, and 
a companion article to complete the fundings of the water main will appear in 
the 1975 Town Meeting. 

We formally joined the Northeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council 
which will provide us with Federal financing for numerous law enforcement 
assistance programs, the first of which is the replacement of all of our 
existing high frequency radio equipment with ultra high frequency radio eqtrlp- 
ment. With the new equipment we will net directly with only one other police 
department, namely Burlington, on a local channel; will add a zone channel 
with ten nei^boring connnunities , and a third regional channel with thirty 
communities. The radio system when completely installed will provide close 
and effective cooperation and assistance in deterring and suppressing the 
criminal acts of breaiking and entering, house breaks, burglary, illegal drug 
traffic and related crimes. 

I>uring 197i4-» we added a section to our General By-Law to control the consump- 
tion of alcoholic beverages in public places, and we have experienced some 
improvement over problems caused by public driiiking. 

The Town accepted about a mile of new roadways in industrial land, a total of 
about one qtiarter of a mile of residential streets under the betterment act, 
and 785 feet of roadway in a residential subdivision. 

On August 26, ^^^kt the Town held a special town meeting for the purpose of 
funding collective bargaining agreements for Town employees other than school 
employees. At the same meeting it was voted to finance, for the current 
budget year, a system of Town employee compensation upon their retirement for 
unused sick leave up to a maximum of 100 days. Other action at the special 
meeting included the rezoning of a seventeen acre parcel of land in North 
Wilmington from Rural to Industrial districting. 

I wish to acknowledge that the progress which has been made over the past year 
is due to the leadership provided by the Board of Selectmen, and the services 
have been of high quality due to the professional attitude of our department 
heads and hard work by our employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all by your presence at the Town 
Meeting. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Sterling C. "Morris 
Town Manager 



5 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - JANUARY 1. 1974 - 1975 



Board of Selectmen 



James R. Mlceli, Chairman 
James F. Banda 
George W. Boylen, Jr. 
Michael A. Caira 
A. Daniel Gillis 



Term 
Expires 

1976 
1977 
1977 
1975 
1975 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annually 



School Committee 



L. Barbara Hooper, Chairman 
Harry J, Landers, Vice Chairman 
John Brooks, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
John E. Nealon 
Richard W. Thackeray 



1975 
1977 
1977 
1975 
1976 
1976 



Superintendent of Schools 



Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Christian G. Bachman, Chairman 

Thomas E. Casey, Vice Chairman 

Richard D. Duggan, Secretary 

Richard W. Cogan 

Rodney E. Laughton 

Charles F, Mather 

Madelyn A. McKie 

Brian Rogers 

Arthur F. Spear, Jr. 



1975 
1977 
1975 
1977 
1976 
1976 
1977 
1976 
1975 



BOARDS. COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - JANUARY 1, 1974 - 1975 



APPEAL. BOARD OF 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 

George G. Robertie 

William A. Caperci 

Louis J. Brozyna, Associate 

Peter Enos, Associate 

Parker Hodgdon, Associate 

ASSESSORS. BOARD OF 

Anthony E. Krzeminski , Principal 

Roy P. McClanahan 

Charles P. Lawrensen 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 
Paula O'Brien, Chairman 
Evelyn S. Burke 
Vonda I. Cram 
Hilda P, Nelson 
Dorothy J. Siteman 

BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 
Barry Garden, Chairman 
Mary Barry 
Barbara E. Cogan 
Sarah H. Cosman 
Marilyn F, Domfeld 
Marguerite Elia 
Catherine A. Filipowicz 

CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 
Madelon C. Slater, Chairman 
Kenneth Wilson 
Anne M. Rounds 
Julia Fielding 
Mildred E. Neilson 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
Willis C. Lyford, Chairman 
William F. Cavanaugh 
Thomas H. McMahon 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Joseph J. Kulig, Chairman 

Alice W. Papaliolios, Vice Chairman 

Ursula M. Leahy 

Nancy E. Kaufman 

Arthur W. Bureau 

George H. Rushton 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

A. Josephine O'Neil, Chairman 

Hazel E . Backman 

Gladys A. Babine 

Sheldon Maga 

Abbie McQuaid 

Nema K. Miller 

Wilson J. Belbin 

Grace Bourbeau 



COUNCIL ON AGING (continued) 
1977 George W. Boylen, Sr. 1977 

1975 Joseph E. Bulger 1977 

1976 Edwin Nash 1977 
1975 

1975 D RUG COMMITTEE 

1975 Joan D. Kritter, Chairman 

Carol A. Cooke, Secretary 

Michael DiGregorio 

Scott Kent 

Lester E. White 



HEALTH. BOARD OF 

James J. Durkee, Chairman 1977 

Marion C. Boylen 1976 

Joseph A. Paglia 1975 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Walter C. Kohler, Chairman 1977 

Hope Hathaway 1975 

1975 

William G. Meyer 1976 

J. Parker Prindle 1976 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

George W. Hooper, Chairman 1975 

Donald R. Garland, Vice Chairman 1975 

Barbara H. Larson 1976 

Leo M. Woodside 1977 

Lulu E. Sanborn 1978 

1976 (Rep. of State Housing Bd.) 

1975 

1976 INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

1977 Raymond A. McNamara 1977 
1977 Ray A. York 1977 

Bernard F. Brady 1978 

Lionel M. Baldwin 1979 

1975 1979 
1976 

1977 LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

E. Hayward Bliss, Chairman 1976 
Shirley F. Callan, Vice Chm, and Secretary 1975 

1976 Philip B. Buzzell 1975 

1977 Sally A. Harding 1976 
1975 Evelyn M. Norton 1977 
1975 Roland I. Wood 1977 
1976 

1977 PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION 

1977 Larry Noel, Chairman 1977 

Nancy C, DeWilde 1975 

John P. Gushing 1976 

1975 Francis Sferrazza 1976 

1975 Paul J. Bova 1977 

^■^^^ PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

iQ7fi Arthur R. Smith, Jr., Chairman 1975 

iQ7fi David A. Holbrook 1975 

Joseph J. Hartka 1976 

1Q77 Arthur G. Pizzuti 1976 

Patricia White 1977 



7 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
Richard V. Barry 
John F, Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 

PLANNING BOARD 

Arthur E. Harding, Jr., Chairman 
Robert F. Leahy 
William J. Hanlon 
Louis A. Maglio, Jr, 
William G. Hooper, Jr, 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 

William F. Butt 

Sidney R. Kaizer 

Carl A. Backman, Jr. 

Currie N, Johnson (State Member) 



1978 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1979 



1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1979 



REGIONAL VOCATIONAL/ TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Eugene L. Kritter 1977 
Frank H. McLean 1976 



REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

F. Talbot Emery, Chairman 

Robert L. Cavanaugh 

Mary G. Condrey 

Esther L. Russell, Clerk 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 
Mary E. Denault , Secretary 
Arnold C. Blake 

WATER & SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
Arnold C. Blake, Chairman 
Vincent R. McLain 
Robert Mullarky 

WASTE DISPOSAL SITE STUDY COMMITTEE 

Dr. Betty Bigwood 

Joel F. Gardiner 

John M. Graney 

Edmund H. Sargent 

Clyde F. Shufelt 

Donald White 



1975 
1976 
1977 



1976 
1975 
1977 



1977 
1975 
1976 



ELECTIONS OFFICERS (continued) 

Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. O'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte Stewart, Deputy Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Barbara H. Webber, Deputy Clerk 
Miriam H. Colucci, Inspector 
Lorita B. Bower, Deputy Inspector 
Marion P. Nee, Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Deputy Inspector 

Precinct 3 
Stanley Webber, Warden 
Basil L. Weatherbee, Deputy Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Clerk 
Anne M. Rounds, Deputy Clerk 
Mary E. Woods, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Deputy Inspector 
Florence A. Balkus, Inspector 
Bernice A. Butler, Deputy Inspector 

Precinct 4 
William H. Russell, Warden 
Sarah H. Cosman, Deputy Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary H. O'Rourke, Deputy Clerk 
Doris V. Russell, Inspector 
Marjorie C. Kennedy, Deputy Inspector 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Edith Cuoco, Deputy Inspector 

Precinct 5 
Jean Lefavour, Warden 
Dora C. Ardolino, Deputy Warden 
Mildred Hillier, Clerk 
Margaret E. Blonigen, Deputy Clerk 
Carole A. Bailey, Inspector 
Elizabeth A. Blaisdell, Deputy Inspector 
Edith L. Poloian, Inspector 
Ruth S. Coursey, Deputy Inspector 

Precinct 6 
Margaret L. Perry, Warden 
Estelle M. Bulger, Deputy Warden 
Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 
Nancy C. DeWilde, Deputy Clerk 
Diane H. Ryan, Inspector 
Patricia D. McNaughton, Deputy Inspector 
Jean F. Howard, Inspector 
Elizabeth Andrews, Deputy Inspector 



Annua] 



WILMINGTON ELECTIONS OFFICERS 
Precinct 1 

Mary D'Eon, Warden Annually 

Grace E. Krzeminski, Deputy Warden " 

Joan M. Lanzillo, Clerk " 
Dianne M. Polizzotti, Deputy Clerk 

Clarice J. Ross, Inspector " 

Alta Lyons, Deputy Inspector " 

Edith Ann Graham, Inspector " 

Dolores E. Romanski, Deputy Inspector " 



8 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1, 1974 - 1975 



Accountant 


Robert H. Peters 


Administrative Assistant 


Mary E. Denault 


Animal Inspector 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Assistant Town Manager 


Peter L. Holzmeister 


Building Inspector 


Charles P. Lawrenson 


Cemetery Superintendent 


Francis E. Downs 


Civil Defense Director 


Silverius J, Blonigen 


Constable 


A. John Imbimbo 


Dog Officer 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Engineer 


Robert L. Higgins 


Fence Viewer 


Edmund H. Sargent 


Fire Chief 


Arthur J. Boudreau 


Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


Highway Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 


Ipswich River Watershed Commission 


James R, Miceli 


Librarian 


Philip W, Meriam 


Medical Agent, Board of Health 


Gerald A, Fagan, M. D. 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Madelyn A. McKie 


Milk Inspector 


Ernest F. Romano 


Nurse, Public Health 


Anne Butters, R. N. 


plumbing Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


Public Building Superintendent 


Roy P. McClanahan 


Police Chief 


Paul J. Lynch 


Recreation Director 


Ronald Swasey 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


Martin P, Farrell 


Town Clerk 


Esther L. Russell 


Town Clerk (Assistant) 


Margaret A. Wagstaff 


Town Collector 


Marion C. Murphy 


Town Collector (Deputy) 


Catherine P. Lindmark 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


Town Sanitarian 


Ernest F. Romano 


Town Treasurer 


Mary E. Denault 


Town Treasurer (Assistant) 


Elizabeth R. Fosgate 


Tree and Moth Superintendent 


Thomas 0. Sullivan 


Veterans' Agent 


Paul A, Farrell 


Veterans' Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


Water Superintendent 


Kenneth C. Motschmann 


Wire Inspector 


Charles L. Webster 



Constable 



During the year 197U» I have posted Notices and Warrants for the Annual and Special Town Meetings and also 
for the State Primary and Elections. 

I served and posted Notices for the Town and other officers and departments. 



9 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATIOIT - 1975 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations f Taxation) 


$ 9,9i|6,252.25 


Total Appropriations ( Available Funds) 




Total Deficits 


342,172.90 


School Lunch Program 


1+5,088.33 


Free Public Libraries 


6,M3.25 


Special Education Grant Chapter 766 


3,5U9.00 


County Retirement Assessment 


182,867.00 


County Tax 1. Fiscal 1975 Estimates 


396, 359. 1U 


2. I973-7I; Underestimates 


6,997.77 


County Hospital 


32,079.96 


State Recreation Areas 


77,619.7U 


Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 


91,365.80 


Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


160,1|90.00 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 


2,297.85 


Air Pollution Control District 


1,03U.10 


Special Education (1972- 766) 


38,000.00 


Ipswich Water Shed 


503.90 


Overlay of Current Year 


258,991.93 



$11,28l,U96.50 



Gross Amount to be Raised 



1,6U5.830.67 
$12,927,327.17 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds ; 

1975 Fiscal Year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid & Agency Funds 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Licenses 

Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

Charities, Old Age Assistance (other than federal grants) 

Veterans ' Services 

Libraries 

Recreation 

Cemeteries 

Interest 

Farm Animal, Machinery and Equipment Excise 
Ambulance Service 
Sewer Revenue 
Miscellaneous Receipts 
Workmen's Compensation and Insurance 
Total Estimated Receipts 



2,68U,6U0.93 
696, 731. U2 
10,000.00 
2,ii37.75 
13,31U.93 
12,872.30 
37,359.00 
7,503.25 
2,i;85.Ul 
6,386.30 
U, 312. 75 
1,539.50 
2,328.68 
12,14+2.00 

81,891.70 
236.33 

6,822.U0 
100,062.01 
2,878.32 
18.386.^0 
3,70U,631.l8 



10 



Recapitulation - 1975 Fiscal Year (continued) 



Overestimates $ 15,167.51 

Voted from Available Funds 1 , 335,2l4j..25 

Total Available Funds $ 1,350, M1.76 

Total Estimated Receipts $ 5,055,0^3.21+ 

Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation $ 7.872,283.93 

Personal Property 4,328,1+55-00 @ 56.50 per M $ 2l4i|,557.71 

Real Estate 1 35,OOl|,OOi;.00 @ 56.50 per M 7,627.726.22 

Total Levied on Property $ 7,872,283.93 

Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate ; 

1. Betterment and Special Assessments added to Taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 10,289.85 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 7,356.12 

c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 9,889.17 

2. Water Liens added to Taxes I9.l89.llj. 

Total 1 U6,72U.28 

Total of all other Commitments $ 7.919.OO8.2I 



Town Treasurer 



Cash on hand - Januaiy 1. I97I; 630,503.92 

Receipts 25,081,1+10.69 

Disbursements 23,600,702.05 

Cash on hand - December 3I , I97I+ 2,111.212.56 



Investments: 



During 1971+ the program of investing idle funds from Bond Issues and General Funds was continued with a 
resulting profit of $106,298. Interest rates during the year varied from 8 l/l+% to 11 7/8% on our invest- 
ments depending on the market. 

Funds received during the year from the Federal Revenue Sharing program were invested also with a return 
of $60,1+08. 



11 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 1^6, General Laws as amended ; 



Births - final fi^e for I973 222 

Births - actually recorded to date for 197^4- 213 

Marriage Intentions recorded - 197U 200 

Marriages recorded - 1974 211 

Deaths recorded - 197U 89 



Chapter 1^6, Section 15 ; 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 111|, Section US '- 

Twelve Biirial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 197^4^ 

Eleven out-of-state deaths reported and filed in this office. Seven Wilmington Veterans died out of town 
and were buried in Wildwood Cemetery. 



TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and certificates of registration for the storage of inflammables ; 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in 
the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March I5. 
If not registered by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public hearing. 



Inflammables 111 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 229 

Unifonn Commercial Code terminations kk 

Federal Tax Lien recordings 22 

Dog Licenses issued as of January 9» 1975 I676 

Duplicate dog tags issued to January 9» 1975 21 

Business Certificates recorded 37 

Business withdrawals 1 

Pish & Game Licenses 859 

Pole Locations 26 

Medical Registration 

Bazaars and Raffles 6 



12 



other Services; 



Keep minutes of Anmaal and Special Town Meetings up-to-date. (Certify same upon request.) 

Tovm Clerk has complete charge of elections. Records election results. 

Send State Election results to State Secretary forthwith. 

Keep Jury List up-to-date. Draw jurors when court orders come throiigh. 

Certified an undertermined numher of Births, Marriages and Deaths. 

Certified aji undertermined number of Births, (Abstract forms) - used for school entrances, 

drivers' licenses, out-of-state travel and job applications. 
Proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrance; tmdetermined niomber. 
Miscellaneous sales of books and maps - undetermined number. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 
Occasionally appear in court for the Town when summoned - producing all papers and maps 
required . 

Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasixrer - after approval by the 

Selectmen. Certify same. 
Record Board of Appeal decisions. 
Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 
Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 
Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

The Town Clerk, in her capacity as a justice of the peace, certified an undetermined 
number of legal papers for town officers. Married couples by appointment when presented 
with the proper credentials in her home. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, 
I have - 

Met with the Board on regular meetings and special meetings. 

Kept the minutes of the Board up-to-date. 

Worked with the police on the census. 

Kept the voting list up-to-date. 

We are now in precincts as is directed by law. 

Registered voters during office hours. 

Supervised the distribution and filing of nomination papers. 

Prepared the Town ballot for the voting machines and ordered the printing of same. 
Supervised the printing of the "Persons' Listed" book. 
Supervised the payrolls for town meeting and election workers. 

The use of voting machines has made oior elections more efficient, and the hours we 
work are much shorter, and the results of the election are known earlier. 

There is a supply of books, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" from 1730 to I898, compiled by James E. Kelley, 
available at the Town Clerk's office for the price of S2.00 per copy. 




Town Clerk Esther Russell taking oath of office from student government officials. 

13 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3» of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held 
on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and the conduct of business. Under 
Chapter 626 of the Acts of 19^8, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in th. 
Town Hall. 

The Board held registration periods as are required by law for the Annual Town Election and Town Meeting, 
one Special Town Meeting, a State Primary and a State Election. 

The Town Clerk has attended Massachusetts Town Clerk conferences in order to keep up with the constantly 
changing election laws. 

In order to keep the voting list as up-to-date as possible, the Board annually compares the voting list with 
the annual census. If a voter's name does not appear in the census, it is subject to removal from the 
voting list. Drop letters are sent to these people advising them to get in touch with the Town Clerk. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in the 
town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of the Board 
of Registrars so that yoiir name will not be removed from the voting list inadvertently. 

Women voters, married prior to January 1, should notify the Board of Registrars so that their new name may 
be printed on the voting list. 

1971-State Census (considered 'official') 17,2^1. 



I97I1 Town Census (unofficial). . 17,800 
I97U Town Census of dogs .... 2,369 



Registered Voters as of January 1, 197U: 



Democrats. 

Republicans 

Undeclared 



Total 



3,217 
1,081 
3>632 
7,930 



As of August 8, I97U, after 
census had been compiled. 



1U 



Town Collector 



TOTAL COMMITMEirrS - ^^^h 



$12,766,595.32 



1971;- 1975 Real Estate 

197!;- 1975 Water Liens 

197ii-1975 App. Street Betterments 

Committed Interest 

197U-''975 App. Water Betterments 

Coimnitted Interest 

19714.-1975 App. Sewer Betterments 

Committed Interest 

I97I4.-I975 Personal Property 

I97I1-I975 Farm 

I97U Real Estate 

I97U Excise - Motor Vehicle 

1974 Personal Property 

I97U Farm 

1973 Excise - Motor Vehicle 

1972 Excise - Motor Vehicle 

I97I; App. Street Bettement Paid in full 

Committed Interest 

19714- App. Water Betterment Paid in full 
Committed Interest 
Unapportioned Water Betterment 

COLLECTIONS - 1971; 

Real Estate 
Water Liens 

App. Street Betteiments 
Committed Interest 
App. Water Betterments 
Committed Interest 
App. Sewer Betterments 
Committed Interest 
Excise - Motor Vehicle 
Personal Property 
Farm 

App. Street Betterment Paid in full 

Committed Interest 

App. Water Betterment Paid in full 

Committed Interest 

Unapportioned Water Betteiments 

Interest and Costs - All years 

Municipal Lien Certificates & 

Certificates Dis. Betterments 
Water Department Collections 
Ambulance 



''971;-1975 

$3,568,906.26 

15,25U.79 
6,603.06 
3,155.52 
i+, 132.77 
i,65U.35 
5,150.76 
i;,738.Ui 

1211,891.30 
93.69 



15,005.03 



$3,719,21+3.06 



338,081.50 

126,66U.32 
187.38 
i|,0li9.62 
70.82 
1,U38.90 
IU.23 
U, 102.87 



2,3U8.00 
M;7,3U3.U5 
358.65 



7,627,726.25 
19,189.1U 
6,900.16 
3,389.69 
5,272.52 
2,083.60 
5,150.76 
U,738.M 
2l4i|,557.7i 
187.38 
3,981|,957.08 
577,156.65 
127,786.80 
187.38 
138,911.51 
ii,11;6.7U 
1|,0U9.62 
70.82 
1,711;.U8 
16. lU; 
8,U02.18 

OTHER YEARS 

125,392.72 

1, 576.141 
127.00 
80.1+8 
ltl+2.20 
190.76 



160, 539. 6U 
6,558.95 



TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



$ 8,692,396.93 



15 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Coimsel coverin<< 
the year ^^7k^ 

A. On January 1, 1975> there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of actions 
in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien fore- 
closure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal for 
variance by zoning by-laws) 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) 

Joseph Scarp etal v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the removal of 
soil , loam, sand or gravel) 

John J. Elia v. Bruce MacDonald etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of certiorari 
concerning revocation of a gasoline storage license) 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of da.ma.ges for land taking) 

John E. Hayward etal y. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Coiort (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) 

Hillcrest Realty Inc. v. A. Daniel Gillis etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of decision of 
Planning Board denying approval of definitive subdivision) 

Morton Grant etals v. Robert E. Jennings etal, Middlesex Superior Coiirt (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals) 

Robert Stevens, Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Cotirt (Petition for registration 
and claim to Swain Court - Private Way) 

Town of Wilmington v. Lee A. Ward etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for property 
damage to a police cruiser) 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for contempt for 
failTire to comply with final decree) 

16 



Town of Wilmington v. Boston and Maine Bailroad, U. S. District Co\irt - Bankruptcy in re - Boston and 
Maine Railroad Reorganization Proceedings (Claim for real estate taxes due) 

Robert W. Meserve etal Trustees for the property of Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation v. Town of 
Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages^ 

John J. Elia Tr. v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) 

Richard D. Zambemardi etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen etals, Middlesex Superior Court 
(Suit in equity for declaratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph A. LaCreta, Middlesex Superior Co-urt (Petition in equity to enforce the 
zoning by-laws) 

Application of Richard Anderson v. Town of Wilmington, Board of Conciliation and Arbitration (Petition 
for hearing before Board of Conciliation and Arbitration re - dismissal) 

Harry S. Sukeforth etals Trs. y. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
(Petition for assessment of damages) 

Else M. Lanois v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages 
for land taking) 

William L. Schromm etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill 
in equity claiming damages and specific relief concerning incidents related to sewer construction) 

Robert Lewis v. Esther L. Russell etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of mandamus to 
require Town Clerk to issue kennel license) 

Chester A. Kwiatkowski etal v. James F. Banda etals, Middlesex Superior Coirrt (Petition for assessment 
of betterments) 

John Morton etals v. Charles T. Lawrenson, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of mandamus to 
require Building Inspector to enforce zoning by-law) 

Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (Action for property damage - 
negligence ) 

Gus Sola V. Town of Wilmington, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Action in contract of 
employment under Mass. G. L. C. Ul, 111F) 

Clarence Spinazola v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) 

Robert L. Stevens v. William G. Hooper, Jr. etals, Middlesex Superior CoTirt (Appeal under C . 1;1 » 
s. 81 BB from the failure of the Planning Board to properly endorse a plan) 

Pauline Cola v. L. Barbara Hooper etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal \mder Chapter 7I , section i^3A) 

Town of Wilmington v. Brian Perry etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Ejectment 
subsequent to property being acquired by Town) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph V. Balestrieri, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Action of tort 
for property damage to police cruiser) 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1975» kh separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. 



17 



B. (l) During the year 197U> the following new actions were broToght against the Town of Wilmington or its 
officers or agents: 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of Complaint for 
Declaratory Relief as to the Validity of a Sewer Bettennent Assessment) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of Complaint for 
Declaratory Relief as to the Validity of Assessment of Sewer Use Charges, for Recovery of Damages, and for 
Injunctive Relief) 

George Anderson etal v. Town of Wilmington etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
personal injury) 

School Teacher v. The Wilmington School Comniittee, Eqtial Employment Opporttmity Commission (Complaint 
of discrimination as to benefits) 

John J. I^yons etal v. Town of Wilmdngton, Land Coxirt (Complaint to determine validity and extent of the 
Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington) 

George W. Lloyd etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc. and Town of Wilmington Middlesex Superior CoTrrt 
( C omplaint for alleged da.ma.ges resulting from diversion of water) 

Pallotta & Son Development, Inc. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
(Petition for assessment of damages) 

Jajnes Zaccagnini v. James Marsi, Middlesex Superior Co\irt (Complaint alleging libel by police officer i 
the performance of his duties) 

Alfred T. Drinkwater, etal. Trustees v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior CoTirt (Petition for 
assessment of damages) 

Edward W. Powers, etal v. Town of Milton, etal. Supreme Judicial Coiirt (Declaratory judgment to 
deteimine constitutionality of Civil Service Statute) 

John D. Cooke v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Co\irt (Petition for assessment of damages) 

Richard J. Hamish, etal v. Bruce MacDonald, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from Decision of 
Board of Appeals) 

John V. Kunigenas, etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition 
for assessment of damages) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer betterment assessment) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer use charge) 

J. Earl Dick etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Petition for Registration) 

Blais-Porter, Inc. v. Bruce MacDonald etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals) 

B. (2) During the year 1974> 'the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Barry J. Mulholland, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
property damage to town dump truck) 

Town of Wilmington v. Hartford Accident and Indemnity Company - Third Party Action - Middlesex Superior 
Court (Action of contract for insurance indemnity) 



18 



Tovm of Vilmington v. Jean-Cor Construction Corp., etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 
(claim for damages caused by trespass, conversion and destruction of town-owned property and well field) 

Town of Wilmington v. Police Officer (Administrative hearing re - discharge) 

C. During the year 19714., the following actions by or against the Tovm were finally disposed of: 

Town of Wilmington v. Brian Perry etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by 
exe cution for possession) 

Chester A. Kwiatkowski etal v. James F. Banda etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by demurrer 
sustained and abatement allowed in the amount of $200.00 for each petitioner) 

John Morton etals v. Charles T. Lawrenson. Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by settlement and 
agreement for judgment to dismiss the petition) 

Pauline Cola v. L. Barbara Hooper etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Dismissed by Decree of Superior 
Court affirming decision of School Commi ttee dismissing petitioner) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph V. Balestrieri, Fo-urth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of 
af te r finding by the Court for the defendant) 

J. Earl Dick etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Disposed of by Registration subject to 
reservation of easement) 

Blais-Porter, Inc. v. Bruce MacDonald etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by dismissal) 
Town of Wilmington v. Police Officer (Disposed of by resignation of police officer) 



Beautification Committee 



The Beautification Committee, consisting of five members, was formed in the spring of 19714-. Our projected 
goal is to enhance the environment by stimulating interest in projects which we hope will instill civic 
pride in the community. 

Our first year accomplishments consisted of implementing the purchase of ajid decorating window boxes at 
various public buildings, as well as fall plantings of tulip bulbs for spring bloom. It was also through 
the efforts of this committee that our community acqiiired Christmas decorations for this year, with a 
continuing goal for future years. 

As an anniversary year is approaching, we are hopeful that our plans for a gazebo will become a reality 
in 1975. 

We gratefully acknowledge the help of all citizens who so ably assisted us in our endeavors. 



19 



Planning Board 



This year, as in previous years, the Planning Board has been extremely busy with general planning as well as 
subdivision planning. The Planning Board generally meets on the first and third Tuesdays of each month for 
planning purposes and the second and fourth Tuesdays for subdivision work. 

This year the board regretfully accepted the resignation of William MacKinnon. The board would like to 
express its gratitude for his many years of service both as a responsible board member and as our Board of 
Appeals liaison. Assuming Mr. MacKinnon's duties is the newly-appointed board member, Mr. Loiiis Maglio, Jr. 

As predicted by the "701" Master Plan, which was done by Professor Charles W. Eliot, Wilmington has continuei 
to develop. In order to keep pace with the rapid development, the Planning Board has hired a planning Inter? 
Roger Watkins, along with contracting for the services of a planning consultant, Thomas Associates. 

Planning Consultant 

Thomas Associates has been very busy this past year in evaliiating old reports, as well as re-evaliiating the 
Master Plan. The planning consultant was also responsible for creating an initial work schedule for the 
planning intern. The last and most important undertaking of the consultant is the revision of the Planning 
Board Rules and Regulations Governing the Sub-division of Land. The planning consultant has also been very 
helpful in assisting the Board of Appeals in its deliberation over a proposed multi-unit housing development, 

The board wishes to express its thanks and appreciation to Mrs. Carol Thomas of Thomas Associates for her 
valuable contribution of time, effort and expertise to the Planning Board. 

Planning Intern 

Wilmington's planning intern, Roger Watkins, who is presently attending Tufts University's Graduate Program 
in Planning, was initially involved with the reorganization of office material and information, as well as 
the establishment of procedures in the planning office. Mr. Watkins has been working with the planning 
consultant in numerous areas, such as the following: the revisions of the Planning Board Rules and Regu- 
lations, consolidation of previous reports, and the general planning of controlled development of Wilmington. 
Mr. Watkins has also been preparing a budget breakdown of Planning Board expenditures for the past ten years, 
reviewing plans returned from the Registry of Deeds, many other planning responsibilities which have 
occurred during the course of the year. 

REVISED GOALS 

There are four major goals which have been revised from those in the Master Plan. These revisions are in 
keeping with Wilmington's planned development. These goals are as follows: 

a. To maintain an attractive community, preserving the unique characteristics and natural 
resources of the Town. 

b. To encourage social and economic opportunities for the residents of the Town. 



20 



c. To achieve efficient use of the Town's considerahle land resources by guiding the residential, 
conmercial and industrial development of the Town toward their best locations. To preserve 
the open and predominantly residential character of the community. To encourage a high 
standard of commercial and industrial development in a manner not detrimental to the 
residential character of the Town. 

d. To expand Wilmington's share of the regional economic activity. 

The adherence to these revised, general goals will help to insure Wilmington's planned ajid orderly growth 
in all aspects. 

Objectives 

The Planning Board has already and will continue in the future to implement the following objectives: 
I. Land Use 

a. Providing a balanced conmiunity that utilizes land for residential, industrial, 
commercial and public purposes without conflict between uses and with minimum 
environmental disruption. 

b. Creating land utilization that allows a broad tax base that does not place an 
undue burden on residential uses. 

' II. Housing 

1 a. Guiding new housing development in a manner conducive to the best utilization of 

the land in harmony with the natural environment; especially in relation to soils, 
flood plain, wetlands and proper drainage. 

b. Integrating open space with housing to provide for setting, recreation (active and 
passive), and environmental protection. 

III. Utilities 

a. Insuring that the public sewerage system will be incorporated in new developments 
in order to reduce pollution hazards; also the utilization of the expanded sewerage 
system to shape future land developments. 

b. Developing a water supply and distribution system capable of meeting future water 
demands . 

c. Planning and preparing a solid waste system to serve Wilmington, in coordination 
with regional proposals and needs. 

d. Ins\iring the installation of adequate storm drainage in problem areas. 
IV. Conservation 

a. Planning for acquisition of selected areas within the Town. The acqioisition of 
these lands may either be left as natural unused open space or used in part for 
recreation. 

b. Protecting flood plains within the Town and where feasible and desirable 
integrating open spaces uses with flood plains. 



21 



EVENTS OCCUBRHTG DURING THE PLAieilTG PERIOD 



A. Office Hours 

The Planning Board established expanded office hours, which are posted at the Planning Board 
office. 

B. Number of Plans Recorded 

The niomber of plans recorded by the Planning Board was fifty- three. Forty-one plans were 
approved, eleven were disapproved and one was withdrawn. Of that number, there was one 
industrial subdivision and forty residential plans signed by the board. 

C . Meetings and Conferences 

1. At the Special Town Meeting held in August of 197i|> the Planning Board voted to ajnend 
the zoning map in order to facilitate planned industrial growth. 

2. The board attended the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards conference in 
Hyannis. This conference provided a fruitful forum for exchanging ideas among the 
various boards located throughout the State. 

3. The Fall meeting of Region V-A of the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards 
was hosted by Wilmington. The main emphasis of the meeting was familiarization with 
new laws that would affect both the individiial and regional planning efforts of 
towns and cities in the entire state. The speaker for the evening was Representative 
Barbara Gray. 

h- During the past year the board has both attended and provided information for 
nimerous meetings dealing with such topics as: Low Income and Elderly Housing, 
Community Development Act, Town Forest, Solid Waste Disposal, proposed high school, 
and the Ipswich River Watershed. 

In addition to attending these various meetings, the board held a special meeting with the 
Board of Selectmen. This meeting involved discussions regarding problem areas within the 
Town such as Rte. 129 and Wobum Street By-pass; Town Forest; Chapter 77U of the Massachu- 
setts General Laws dealing with elderly, low and moderate income housing; and signs. The 
purpose of attending and holding the meetings with the various boards and agencies is to 
achieve a well-rounded approach to planning in various areas as well as achieving as much 
citizen participation as possible. 

D. Town Engineer 

Wilmington hired a new Town Engineer, Mr. Robert Higgins. Since his appointment, Mr. Higgins 
has attended all Planning Board meetings, during which he has discussed drainage problems and 
subdivision plans. His valtiable assistance and cooperative efforts have been most helpful in 
aiding the board in its planning endeavors. 

E. Secretary 

The board hired a new secretary, Mrs. Mary Deislinger, to fill the vacancy created by Mrs. Burke's 
resignation. Mrs. Deislinger has had extensive experience working for the Federal government, 
first as a secretary and later as an administrative assistant. The board is appreciative of 
Mrs. Deislinger' s valuable contribution and looks forward to working with her in the future. 



22 



PROPOSED ACTIONS 



A. Articles 

The board is proposing seven articles for the Annual Town Meeting; three articles on customary 
home occupations; two articles on lot shape reqiiirements (V-5); one article on sign by-laws; 
and one article on the Wo bum Street by-pass. 

B. Town Forest 

It is the consensus of the board that the acquisition of additional parcels of land in the area 
of the 'Town Forest would greatly enhance this open space and protect one of Wil mi ngton's 
greatest assets. In addition to the acquisition of land, the closing of a portion of 
Ballardvale Street to reduce traffic would further protect the Town Forest. 

C. Flood Hazard Maps 

Preparation is in progress to compare aerial photographs prepared for Wilmington with HDD maps 
so as to up-date the flood hazard maps of the board. 

D. KPA 



An initial evaluation was made of the Environmental Protection Agency's new regulation 
concerning the management of parking supply. To facilitate Wilmington's \mderstaiiding of this 
State regulation, further evaluation by the board will be forthcoming. 

The board wishes to express its gratitude for the cooperation that the Town's boards, commissions and commit- 
tees have displayed throughout the year. 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 1»678 

Dogs Confined 278 

Complaints Covered 3fkh^ 

Court Complaints 38O 

Court Fines Paid $99^ 

Dogs Disposed of 1|29 

Dogs Killed by Cars 53 

Residents Notified for Licenses 979 

Kennels - $50.00 Licenses 1 

$25.00 " 

S10.00 " 



23 



Permanent Building Committee 



The Permanent Building Committee hired engineers for geohydrological survey and sutsurface sewage disposal 
system designs. Our architect has completed preliminary plans, designs and estimates on the proposed new 
high school, and we are presently working on environmental studies for the School Building Assistance Board. 

Considerable time has been spent with various agencies, local and State, in an attempt to satisfy the many 
requirements now imposed on new school biiilding programs. 



Library Trustees 



The Library Trustees, listed in the front of this Annual Town Report, hereby report to the citizens of 
Wilmington by means of an informative narrative by our Director, Philip W. Meriam. 

The Annual Reports since moving into the new building, particularly the last, 1973 report, give real detail 
of dedicated development of a cultural, educational, enjoyable center where all residents of our town can 
satisfy many of their needs, desires and enthusiastic worthy endeavors for the betterment of all. 

Specific advancements this past year have been: 

1. Facilities for many other important town activities such as the Women's Club Art Exhibit, 
the Bicentennial Commission, etc. 

2. Pull cooperation both ways with the School Department. 

3. The improved reference section where, among others, the town's commuting college students, 
business and professional people improving their knowledge and expertise — all forms of 
adtilt education, have been greatly aided. 

k- The Circulating Art Program. 

5. The improved Children's section which our librarian elaborates on in his report. 

Your trustees feel that the total library service represents an intangible community investment. We intend 
to continue this commitment of our established policy of development and service to the town as a whole. 
Your gratifying response in the use of the library this past year emphasizes that we shall do so. 

2U 



LIBRAEY STATISTICS 



for the calendar year January 1 - December 31 > 1 91h 
American Library Association Form 



Library: 

Town and State: 

Library Director: 

Date of Pounding: 

Population: 19714- 

Number of agencies: 

Number of days open during the year: 

Hours open each week: 

Number of voliimes beginning of the year 197Us 

Number of volumes purchased during the year: 

Number of voliimes added as gifts: 

Number of volumes withdrawn during the year: 

Number of voluoaes as of December 31 » 197U: 

A/V materials 

Newspapers : 

Periodicals: 

Circulation: 

Adult: 56,271 Children: 37,278 ILL: 321 

A/V: 5,121+ Periodicals: 2,921 Prints: 271 
Circulation per capita: 
Appropriations and income: 
Per capita expenditures: 
Reference questions: 
Interlibrary loans: 

Requests from other libraries: 

Received from other libraries: 
Circulation figures: 

1969 

1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

I97I; 



Wilmington Memorial Libraiy 
Wilmington, Mass. 
Philip W. Meriam 
1871 
17,800 
Main Library 
302 
69 

1^7, 7U5 
3,888 

139 
1,559 
50,213 
1,983 
10 
206 



102,186 
5. 74 
$1314,891; 
$7.58 
3,158 




6 

336 

95,079 
98,298 
93,750 
81|,652 
99,183 
102,186 




A dinosaur in the Children's Room in the Library. 



Wednesday Night Movies in the Library. 



25 



Librarian 



The Children's Department completed a full year of increasingly active and creative service to the town, 
resulting in swelling circulation and intensified use of the room by adults as well as by children. Belief 
in the concept that a children's room should be just as attractive to parents as to their children has 
encouraged the growing use of the room by parents, teachers, students, and community members working with 
children. 

A nationally awakened interest in early childhood and the needs of the young child has been reflected in the 
library's services to the pre-school child and his parent. More and more frequently mothers and fathers 
find the children's room a pleasant and inviting place to spend a quiet time with their young children who 
do puzzles, build towns and railroads, play with the dolls and dollhouses or leaf through picture books and 
gaze at the tropical fish before selecting a few books to take home. In the spring, summer, and fall formal 
story hours were a joy to the children; stories, songs, filmstrips and crafts introduced them to the richnes 
and excitement of their cultural heritage. For many children Story Hour at the library was their first 
experience in being with others of their own age; and for many of their families, it was a first introductic 
to the library and its service. In the fall a series of films based on picture books was planned for 
Ihiesday mornings and was well attended by parents bringing yoimg children of all ages. 

Many children whose parents were unable to bring them to Story Hour had their public library experience 
through the schools. Kindergarten teachers made arrangements for their classes to visit the library, hear 
a story, and receive their first library cards. Several morning groups were able to attend the pictTire 
book films along with the younger children and their families. 

The Central District schools continued to use the library on a regularly scheduled basis throughout the 
school year. For many children these school visits were their only opportunity of getting to the public 
library, and for most it was their only library experience. Elementary school teachers came to borrow books 
for the classroom use of their students and the children's librarian visited classes at the school. 

Formal visits to the library were also made by local n\irsery schools and by scout groups. Boy Scout 

Gary Atamian donated ten hard-working hours to the Children's Department while working on his Public Service 

merit badge. 

A recent development in the fields of lamguage and education has been an appreciation of the best in 
children's books and their relation to the mainstream of English literature. As a result of this concern, 
mainy two and four-year colleges, amd high schools as well, offer courses in Children's literatiire. 
Wilmington students enrolled in these coiirses at a variety of academic institutions were increasingly 
frequent visitors to the children's room and during the year made hea'vy use of both children's books and 
books for adults found in the growing professional collection. In the winter the children's librarian was 
a guest lecturer on children's books at the High School. 

Both regularly scheduled and special programs were organized for different age groups throughout the year. 
While preschoolers enjoyed summer-long story hours conducted by Mrs. Arlene Ten Dyke, a variety of vacation 
activities were available to older children. 



26 



A Greek Festival was held during the sunmer complete with slides, authentic objects to see, touch, and use, 
an exhibit of books, give-away instructions for the making of ancient Greek costumes and for mastering the 
alphabet, and an active session of Greek dancing. Several workshops were held for large groups of children 
who became involved in printmaJcing and the art of making simple books. 

An on-going project during the summer was the popular Dinosaur Club which met weekly under the able direction 
of library page Barbara Taylor. With the help of volunteer Mrs. Ellen Heigham and members of the library 
staff over one h\mdred children participated in producing a personable Tyrannosaurus Rex which now overlooks 
the entrance to the children's room. A "Name the Dinosaixr" contest later christened him Seemore Danger. 
Seemore was a star attraction in the children's section at the Boston Book Festival in October. 

An informal project begun during the summer was a book to be authored and illustrated by Wilmington children. 
Upon completion, it will be professionally bound and cataloged for the library's collection. 

A regular Friday afternoon film program for children in the first grade and up was resimed in the fall, 
featuring movies borrowed from the Easter region's collection which are not likely to be seen on television. 
A special showing of the Royal Ballet's "The Tales of Beatrix Potter," rented for the occasion, was seen by 
a total of nearly five hundred children in April. Arts and crafts films were shown in the summer, and 
Christmas films in December with the "Nutcracker" ballet scheduled for Christmas vacation. 

National Children's Book Week was celebrated in November with a display of Victorian children's books from 
a private collection arrayed in the glass case on the library's main floor, and by an exhibit in the 
children's room honoring Boston's Horn Book magazine on its fiftieth anniversary. Colorful large scale 
figures lovingly copied by talented Barbara Taylor from illustrations in favorite children's books were on 
view for the first time, and there was a special showing for all ages of a filmed interview with 
Robert McCloskey, author-illustrator of Make way for ducklings . 

Film programs, exhibits, book talks, story hours, contests, and similar activities have combined with a 
variety of exciting offerings in the print and non-print collections to achieve enormous growth in and 
enthusiastic response to children's services in 197U. 

Each year as services are expanded and a wider audience is reached greater demands are made upon an already 
understaffed Children's Department. The programs and services outlined above would not have been possible 
without the tremendous support given by every member of the library staff. Cooperative, sympathetic, and 
hard working, they were always there when needed, often at a moment's notice. Particular appreciation is 
due to Mrs. Phyllis Allen, children's room assistant, now leaving to resume a nursing career. She has been 
a rock of gibralter who will be greatly missed by those with whom she has worked and the public she has 
served so well. 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



This is a list of all weighing and measuring devices, scales, pumps, meters, weights that were tested, sealed, 
and condemned during the year 197U« 



Balances, Scales and Weights 
Capacity Measures 
Liquid Measuring Meters 
Other Measuring Devices 
Prepackaged Foods Reweighed 



Adjusted 
65 
2h 
72 
23 
2,975 

27 



Sealed 

159 

hi 
185 

36 



Not Sealed 
20 
15 
10 

15 



Condemned 
25 
20 
30 
15 



Police Department 



ARRESTS 

Assault & Battery 

Auto Theft 

Breaking & Entering 

Disorderly Conduct 

Fraud 

Larceny 

Non Support 

Receiving Stolen Property 

Sex Offenses 

Vandalism 

Violation of Liquor Laws 
All Other Offenses 



MOTOR VEHICLE AEEESTS 
Driver's License Violations 
Endangering 

Leaving Scene After Causing Property Damage 
Operating Under the Influence 
Unregistered-Uninsured 
Speed 

Using m/V Without Authority 
All Others 



HELD IN PROTECTIVE CUSTODY - NO ARREST 

JUVENILE CASES HAKDLED BY THE COURT 

JUVENILE CASES HANDLED WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT 

OFFENSES REPORTED 
Assaults: Gun 

Knife 

Hands , Feet 
Other 



AUTO THEFTS 

Stolen in Wilmington-Recovered by Wilmington 
Stolen in Wilmington-Recovered Out of Town 
Stolen out of Town-Recovered by Wilmington 
Stolen-Not as yet Recovered 



36 
2h 
26 
11 
1 

63 
13 
16 

6 

19 
16 
138 
369 



57 

20 
7 

15 
73 
68 

17 
217 

m 

353 
5U 
28 



11 

38 

-i 



HQ 
59 
78 

_li 

198 



BREAKING & ENTERING 
Forcible Entry 
No Force 
Attempts 



LAHCENY COMPLAINTS 
Pocket Picking 
Shoplifting 
From Autos 
Auto Parts 
From Buildings 
From Coin Machines 
All Other 



BICYCLES 
Bicycles Stolen 
Bicycles Recovered 

MALICIOUS DAMAGE 

PROWLERS 

ROBBERIES 
Armed Robberies 
Unarmed Robberies 

SEX OFFENSES REPORTED 
Rape by Force 
Indecent Exposiire 
Indecent Assaiilt 
All Other 



MISCELLAHEOUS 
Arson 

Bomb Threats 

Dist\irbances 

Domestic Problems 

Emergencies 

Fires Dispatched to 

Juvenile Problems 

Lost & Found 



281 
13 

336 



1 
21 
173 
165 
113 
2 
26 
501 



92 
12 

564 
91 



10 

h 



1 

12 

k 

20 



5 

kh 

2,800 

818 
1,102 

321 
2,430 
h2 



28 



MISCELLANEOUS (continued) 




OTHER DEPARTMENT FDWCTIONS 




Missing Persons-Still Missing 


1 


Accidents Reported 


512 


Missing Persons-Retuzned 




Accidents-Fatal 


6 


Phone Calls: Suspicious, Otscene & Annoying 


ho 


Firearms Identification Cards Issued 


200 


Sudden Deaths 


12 


Firearms-Licenses to Carry Handgun 


260 


Suicides 


1 


Firearm Dealer Permits Issued 




Suicides, Attempted 


3 


Gunsmith Permits Issued 


1 






Liquor Identification Cards Issued 


67 






Summonses Delivered 


U53 






Suspensions & Revocations from Registry M/V 


127 



VIOLATION OF DRUG LAWS 197U 
Arrest for Dispensing or Distribution: 



Class B Substance Barbit\irates 3 

Class B Substance Amphetamines 3 

Class C Substance L.S.D. & P. CP. 2 

Class D Substance Marijuana £ 

13 

Arrest for Possession of Controlled Substance: 

Class A Substance Herion 2 

Class B Substajice Amphetamine 10 

Class B Substance Barbiturates 7 

Class C Substance L.S.D. & P. CP. 11+ 

Class D Substance Marijuana 30 

Class E Substance Prescription Dinigs 10 

73 

Samples Submitted to Department of Public Health Laboratory: 

Class A Substance Heroin 2 

Class B Substance Amphetamine 33 

Class B Substance Barbiturates 26 

Class C Substance L.S.D. & P. CP. 2$ 

Class D Substance Marijuana UO 

Class E Substance Prescription Drugs 20 

1U6 



The first part of this report contains the statistical data of the things we as a Police Department are 
involved with. Listed categorically and by the nijmber of times we were involved with "this and that," but 
one has to work on the department to know what it is all about. At this time, may I suggest that as you 
read these figures, if you have any questions regarding any category or any figures, please call me at the 
office (658-9261) during the day, or if more convenient for you, at my home by calling 658-3162, There must 
be questions that come to you as you read this report, and if you do have any questions, I feel they deserve 
to be explained. Please call Paul J. Lynch, Chief. 

May I once again remind all residents that the numbers to call are: WILMINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

EMERGENCY CALLS: 658-3331 and 658-3332 FOR ALL OTHER CALLS: 658-5071 and 658-5072 

And again remind you: That if you cannot dial these niombers - just dial "operator" and tell her to call the 
Wilmington Police Department. 



29 



Most important of all rememter that there are cruisers out there twenty-four hours a day, every day of the 
year - and you do not have to wait for a cruiser to leave the station yard to get to your destination. 
Please call us, and let us get to where you are. Too many times have I heard this reply, "I figured that byj 
the time you got here they would have been gone I" I say to that, "Please call, and let us be of service 
to you." 

Wilmington Police Department has experienced our share of changes in the year 197U» and they are reflected 
in the following detail: 



REGULARS 

Sergeant Arthur J. Kelley 
Patrolman Charles J. Do Ian 
Patrolman James E. Marsi 
Patrolman Frederick E. Brown 



George O'Connell 
Dennis Rooney 
Mike Celata 
Al Venuti 
Joe Waterhouse 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Retired 
Retired 
Retired 
Resigned 

Appointed 

September 23, ^^'Jk 
December 9, I97U 
December 10, ^^^Jk 
December 11 , 1971; 
December 12, I97U 



Marguerite Leonard 
Margaret Perry 
Mary Fama 
Rita Richardson 



Barbara LaFave 
Jeanette Davidson 
Matireen McHugh 
Marilyn Fuller 
Barbara Khickle 
Mary Kuchler 
Mary Harvey 
Nancy Auer 



Deceased 
Resigned 
Resigned 
Resigned 

Appointed 



March 1, I97U 
March 1, 197U 
August 20, 1971; 
August 20, 1971+ 
September 3, 197U 
September 20, I97I; 
September 25, I97I1 
September 2^, 197U 



Patrolman Charles Dolan was "Acting Sergeant" to replace Sergeant Charles Ellsworth who left us in 1973» and 
when Charles Dolan retired, Patrick Leonard was appointed "Acting Sergeant." To those who left us, "Good 
Luck and God's Blessings I" To those who have joined us, "Welcome to the TEAMI" 

Some of the highlights of the department for 197U are hereby recorded: 

Margaret Perry, a traffic supervisor, was appointed department clerk on June 2l^. 

Robert LaRivee attended the Firearms Instructors' School conducted by the F.B.I, at Camp Curtis Guild, 
Wakefield. John Harvey attended the BOMB School - State Police and F.B.I, program. 

Wilmington Police Department did themselves proud in the Annual Pistol Team Program involving Billerica - 
Tewksbiiry - Burlington - Wilmington. The Awards Banquet on April 2$ was just great. 

K-9 Officers Langone and Shelley have done a great job in 197U- On the local scene and also other out-of- 
town spots. Officers Langone and Shelley have put on "K-9 Programs." We now have "Duke" and "King" on the 
department ... our two new police dogs. 

Hew Federal radio program is underway, and William Gable is the man from Wilmington P.D. who is co-ordinatin<. 
the program under the direction of Chief McCafferty of Burlington P.D., the director of the program. 

William Gable is also the director of the Explorer Scouts Program for Wilmington Police Department. This is 
a most worthwhile program, and he has the very able assistance of Safety Officer John Ritchie in this prograii 
Boy Scout Meetings have been visited by officers to give talks on many and varied subjects. (Our best 
audience for sure 1 ) 

We have a report covering the activities of Joseph Cuoco, the narcotics officer of the Department. There is 
no question that we are still involved with a local drug problem. Be assiired that Joe Cuoco is pretty well 
aware of what is going on, and if you have anything to contribute to the cause give Joe a call and let him 
know - "what you know." We need youl We need yo\ir cooperation. This is a BATTLE where we need all the 
HELP we can get. Please call Joseph Cuoco. Officer Arthur I^ynch, Jr., attended the emergency medical 
training cotirse at Winchester Hospital - A three months' program, two nights a week, for three months, for a 
total of 81 hours. This is a very important program. It consists of all types of medical emergency work, 
and act\ial participation in working in the emergency room of the hospital. Last year, many other officers 
of the department took this course. Each and every one of them deserve to be congratulated for their 
dedication to a most worthwhile cause. 



30 



To list all the schools and the officers who attend would take too many pages, and when I had completed it 
all, I am certain that I would "miss one or two." Therefore, let me state here and now that I am indeed 
proud of all of you who are attending any colleges, any schools, programs, or courses whereby you are 
furthering your knowledge of your work. 

Public Relations programs worthy of note include such things as: 

Jimmy Fund auction and the Summer recreational program at Silver Lake, sponsored by the Wilmington Police 
Association, deserve to be recognized as a worthwhile project. (Thanks to Jim Cuoco and the Gang I ) 

First Aid Program conducted by Police and Fire Department for Explorer Scouts by Firefighters John Brown 
and Walter Sowyrda - with an assist by William Gable. Good Work! And my thanks I 

In concluding my report, may I take this oppo2?tunity to express my sincere thanks and appreciation to all 
who have in any way been of help or assistance to the Wilmington Police Department in 

Special thanks and appreciation is hereby extended to all the department heads and their crews for all their 
efforts, to the members of the department, the traffic supervisors, the clerks, to the Board of Selectmen, 
to the Town Manager and the Assistant Manager, and to all other Committees and Organizations - for a great 
year of 197U. 



Fire Department 



The maniial force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, four Lieutenants, and twenty- five Privates. There is a 
call force of twelve members. The department responded to a total of one thousand four hundred and twelve 
(I,ii12) calls. 

Residential Buildings 39 Out of Town Assistance 20 

Commercial Buildings 9 False Alarms or Needless Calls 107 

Vehicles 86 Rescue or Emergency Ambulance 593 

Brush, grass and rubbish 372 Service Calls 186 

Estimated value of property endangered was $751>830 
Estimated property loss was $207,398 
Permits issued for blasting 32 
Permits issued for storage of propane gas and oil 59 

Inspections were made of all schools, public buildings, and all inflammable storage as required by law. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Deputy Chief Wandell, made inspections of all business 
establishments in town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of industrial fire 
brigades . 

The Fire Alarm Division, \inder the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the fire 
alarm system and one hundred and twenty- two change-overs for the light and telephone companies were made. 
One mile of new wire was strung. Two new boxes were added to the system. Firefighters Erlmest E. Bums, 
George A. Anderson, Jr., and call members Edward Bradbury and Erlmest E. Bums, Jr., completed an eighty-one 
hour course on Emergency Medical Care at the Winchester Hospital. Three members are attending courses at 
the North CoimnTmity College. 



31 



Building Inspector 







1972 




1973 




I97I1 




No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


No. 


Valuati 


Dwellings (single family) 


121 


$ 2,633,000 


9h 


$ 2,1+92,1+00 


102 


$ 2,520,0 


Residential Garages 




1+8,500 


8 


26,600 


9 


31,3 


Additions & Alterations 


62 


180,000 


89 


278,690 


90 


287,8 






4P ^ , (JO 1 , puu 




ft 7Q7 ^ion 




ft 9 RTQ Qi 


Industrial Buildings 


6 


$ 1,60i|,000 


7 


$ 1,661+, 000 


3 


$ 1,135,0' 


Commercial Buildings (stores) 


1 


30,000 







3 


1+0,31 


Add. & Alter, (non- residential) 


$ 


255,000 


1U 


1,525,800 


10 


759, 


Swimming Pools 


28 


70,600 


60 


130,500 


83 


11+3, 8' 


Signs 


13 


10,600 


11 


6,700 


7 


1,9! 


Utility Biiildings 







3 


52,500 


3 


53, 0( 


Office Buildings 

















Recreational Buildings 


1 


200,000 












Sheds & Bams 


h 


55.500 


7 


25,875 


5 


2,8( 






$ 2,225,700 




3,1|05,375 




$ 2,136,3: 






$ 5.087.200 




$ 6,203,065 




$ U.975.5: 


Renewals 


7 




17 




17 




Demolitions 


10 


$ 2,800 


20 


« 70,350 


15 


$ 119.9c 


Fire Damage & Repair 


3 


11+, 500 







3 


19. 0( 


Foundations 


__i 


15.000 




57,600 


20 






285 


$ 32.300 




$ 127,950 


370 


$ 171+.65 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED 


OVER TO THE 


TREASURER: 










Building Permits 


285 


$ 12,5U6.50 


3U5 


$ 15,858.00 


370 


S 11,999.C 


Gas Fitting Permits 


107 


86I1.OO 


101 


869.00 


173 


1.618.5 


Gas Storage Permits 







k 


20.00 


3 


15. c 


Wiring Permits 


360 


3,596.50 


375 


l+,270.00 


389 


i|,717.C 


Plumbing Permits 


M. 


1,158.50 


M 


1,213.00 


175 


I.321.E 




899 


$ 18,165.50 


972 


$ 22_,^2J0.00 


1,110 


$ 19, 671. c 



32 



197i+ will "be remembered as a year of significant happenings: While siarrounding communities report a sharp 
decline in permits issued, this office recorded its highest level ever achieved, 370 versus the previous 
hi^ of 355 in I96U; and in 197^1 the Department of Comm\mity Affairs was very busy putting together a new 
mandatory Building Code. This was made possible with the passage of Chapter 802 of the Acts of 1972. 

Briefly, Chapter 802 provides that a State Wide Building Regulatory system become effective January 1, 1975 
and that cities and towns assume full responsibility for every phase of construction, occupancy, and use for 
all buildings and structures except those owned or occupied by State or Federal Agencies. Prior to the 
passage of Chapter 802, the department of Public Safety was responsible for many of our buildings and 
structures such as schools, churches, grand stands (bleachers) and places of assembly. 

Chapter 802 also relieves the Department of Public Safety from the responsibility for the examination of 
architechural plans by likewise making this the responsibility of the local inspector. It is my opinion that 
the complexity of this task requires specialized knowledge, skills and times beyond the scope of an ordinary 
Building Department. For example, a plan review of a new school bxiilding would take days of uninterrupted 
time to complete, assuming one has the necessary skills to accomplish this task. 

Additionally Chapter 802 requires a program of certification and re-certification on a scheduled basis of 
schools, churches, function halls, fimeral parlors, bleachers, restaurants, skating rinks, industrial confer- 
ence rooms, all town-owned buildings and all other buildings where twenty or more people assemble. All of 
this is additional work over and above the present administration, inspections and enforcement duties of my 
department . 

The full impact of this legislation is not apparent as yet. However, in the simplest form the local building 
official will assume all of the State Building Inspectors' duties including the maintenance of a new and 
separate filing system of all the State's current records for the Fire Marshall's office or any other State 
Agency involved with court suits. It is impossible to accurately determine what additional personnel will 
be required to properly administer these added responsibilities, but it seems clear that one full-time 
Inspector and a part-time clerk are totally inadeqtiate. 



Bicentennial Commission 



The Bicentennial Commission was formed early in January and held its first meeting with three members. Three 
new people joined a month later. During the spring and summer, the Commission met with representatives of 
several town organizations to discuss ideas for the Bicentennial. 

On November 7» the Commission presented the one-man show "Sons of Liberty" for the citizens of Wilmington. 
Regretably, less than forty people attended. 

In conjunction with the Library Board of Trustees, the Commission applied to the State for a matching- funds 
grant that would allow us to complete a library Bicentennial Room by April 1975* Such a room would house 
books, reports, town records, letters, photographs, and like items of historical value to the town and would 
be open to all citizens. 

rhroughout the month of December, the Commission sponsored an exhibit at the public library. In part, this 
sought to bring attention to the historical materials already owned by the library, suggest ways these might 
be helpful in studying the past and point up the real need for an historical room to house these materials. 
The exhibit was also intended to inform people about the many activities being planned for the Bicentennial 
by Boston, the State, and the nation. 

4. great deal of the Commission's time was spent planning and organizing events for 1975 aJ^d 1976. Coming up 
30on are a "surprise" on the morning of April I9, 1975; a^d in May, a Colonial Living Arts Festival, 
including demonstrations of many aspects of colonial life, in which all town organizations will be invited to 
participate. Future plans include a harvest festival and a colonial ball. 

Phe Commi ssion hopes that all citizens of Wilmington will join in making the two major Bicentennial years of 
1975 and 1976 enjoyable and valuable to future generations. 



33 



Town Engineer 



I hereby submit my Annual Report for the Engineering Department for the year 197U. The year 197^1 for the 
Engineering Department can best be characterized as being one of nevmess; new leadership, new personnel, ai 
a new approach. 

New Town Engineer 

As a replacement for Acting Town Engineer, John J. Majeski, Jr., who resigned his position in January to 
accept a position with a private engineering firm, in June, Town Manager, Sterling C. Morris, appointed 
Robert L. Higgins as Town Engineer. 

New Jr. Civil Engineer 

In November, Town Manager Sterling C. Morris, appointed John P. O'Donnell, to the position of Jr. Civil 
Engineer, in the Engineering Department, a position which had been created by the fiscal 1975 Town Meeting. 

Professionalism 

The new Town Engineer has a bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Massachusetts and 
a master's degree in Public Administration from the University of Rhode Island, is both a registered land 
surveyor and a registered professional engineer in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and was formerly the 
Town Engineer in Arlington and the Assistant Town Engineer in Lexington. The new Jr. Civil Engineer has a 
bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and has had two years experienc 
in a mtinicipal engineering department. 

Evaluation of Work Load 

A c\xrsory inventory of the work load for the Engineering Department reveals that we spend our time as folio 
14.0% Planning Board, Subdivisions; i|0% Highway Department, Construction projects; 10% Town Manager and 
Selectmen; 10% All others. Because of our increased capacity and by streamlining our approach, it appears 
that in the futujre we will be able to provide more balanced service and in that way better serve the Town. 

In-House Procedures 

Inspection of our record-keeping capability revealed a lack of contin\iity and a helter-skelter approach. 
Since this was an area in which corrections could be started immediately, this program is now underway with 
the department. The ultimate result will be a system which is not only useful to the citizens of the Town, 
but will be especially valuable to other town departments, boards, and commissions. 

Projects for the Year 

A large number of streets were prepared for acceptance at the Town Meeting. Those that were successful wer< 
Lexington Street, Momingside Drive, Industrial Way, Progress Way, Scaltrito Drive. For the first two, the 
department provided design and layout for construction and for the latter three, the department had provide( 
inspection to assizre compliance with town standards. Subdivision streets inspected during the year were in 
the Glen Acres Estates, Juniper Ridge, Lucaya Estates, Elmwood Village, and North Wilmington Industrial Pari 
subdivisons. Drainage projects included work on Rotary Park, King Street, Wobum Street and Federal Street 
Sidewalk construction included work on Adams Street, Burlington Avenue and Shawsheen Avenue. Water main 
construction included work on Brattle Street and Fay Street. Additional sophisticated projects included a 
determination of street light poles and level of lighting in subdivisions served with underground power, 
many reviews of new subdivision rules and regulations, and as usual, planning and preliminary design for mai 
future projects which will be included in subsequent annual reports. 

Conclusion 

While we continue to provide the seTvice which we have always provided, it appears that we will be able to 
provide that same service better, faster, and more efficiently. It also appears that we will be able to 
provide this same high qiiality service in more and different areas. We look forward to the opportunity to 
do this. 



3k 



Tree Department 



Trimming, cutting and removing trees was done ty the Tree Department. The annual tree planting program took 
place in April. A total of 230 maple trees were set out. Usually these trees are cared for by the people 
who request them. As some had no knowledge of caring for the trees and didn't want to harm them, the Tree 
Department took care of the task. Fifty-seven dead and diseased roadside trees were removed. A number of 
trees were removed to allow for the widening of streets and sidewalk construction. The feeding and care of 
trees was done to insirre proper growth. In April the insect control began. The Tree Department vehicles 
are used to plow snow for the Highway Department. We replaced flagpoles and ropes when requested by the 
School Maintenance Department. We assisted with the work on clean-up day. At Christmas time we set up and 
trimmed a tree for Deming Way, and we also put up lights and decorations at the request of the Beautification 
Committee. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease 

Samples of elm trees, believed to be diseased, were sent to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 
Because of the findings, 57 had to be taken down. The Tree Department's stump cutter was used to remove 
nmerous tree stumps. 

Moth Department 

Through continuous spraying, the control of such insects as oak skeletonizers, fall webworm, Japanese beetle, 
etc. was maintained. Poison ivy is also being eliminated by spraying. A great many hornet's nests were 
removed and destroyed. 

li; Mosquito Control Program 

The control of the mosquito is done with the use of a fog generator owned by the Tree Department. Fogging is 
done between the hours of eight and twelve o'clock in the evening. We ask that the parents caution their 
children about the danger involved in following the fogger. Larvaecide was administered to all the trapped 
water holes. 



I would like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the town departments 
for their cooperation, and the men of the Tree Department for their cooperation and efforts during the 
year 197!;. 





New Civil Defense rescue vehicle in the 
Fire Departmen t 



Students of West Intermediate School 
involved at their request in conservation and 
planting program. 



35 



Highway Department 



All the re^lar highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as patching streets, cleaning 
catch basins, sweeping streets, erection of street signs, painting guard rails, replacing guard rail posts, 
scraping back roads, replacing broken curbing, etc. 

Chapter 81 Maintenance ; 

The following streets were resurfaced all or in part: Pinewood Road, Birchwood Road, Judith Road, Lawrence 
Street, Lawrence Court, Glendale Circle, High Street, Wobum Street, Virginia Road, South Street, Phillips 
Avenue, Oakwood Road, Emerson Street, Fairfield Road, Lloyd Road, Davis Road, Bumap Street, Silverlake 
Avenue, Lake Street, Nichols Street, Beech Street, Dell Drive, Patricia Circle, Marion Street, I^stic 
Avenue, Oakdale Road and Shady Lane Drive. 

Sidewalk Prograjn ; 

Sidewalks were constructed on Shawsheen Avenue from Aldrich Road to Wilton Drive, on Burlington Avenue from 
Chestnut Street to Boutwell Street, also from Harris Street to Walker Street, and Adams Street from Chandler 
Street to Fairview Avenue. 

Hot Top Program ; 

This money comes from the Highway Department expense account. We hot topped the following streets: Adams 
Street from Church to Parker Street, Fairmeadow Road, and Cunningham Street from Beeching Avenue to Jacobs 
Street. 

Drainage ; 

The following drainage problems were eliminated this year - new drainage system on King Street and Wobum 
Street. Other drainage problems were eliminated with the construction of new catch basins on the following 
streets: Adams Street, Glen Road, Federal Street, Cypress Street, Fairfield Road. Culverts were replaced 
on Andover Street and Kilmarnock Street. Also under this account, over $10,000 was paid to a private 
contractor to eliminate the water problem on Chestnut Street. 

Betterment Streets : 

The Highway Department constructed the following streets this year; Lexington Street and Momingside Drive, 
which are about 80% completed at this time. The curbing, finish hot top, loam and seeding will be completed 
in the spring. 

Clean-up, Pick-up Campaign : 

The annual clean-up, pick-up campaign was conducted in April. This year it was decided to conduct the 
program differently than previous years. This year it was not necessary for householders to call the 
Highway Department, as each precinct was scheduled for a pick up day. This system worked very well and 
will be used in the future. 

Roadside Pick-up : 

This program is sponsored by the Chamber of Conmierce and the students. Again this year a lot of credit 
should be given to the students participating in this program, picking up roadside trash and bagging it. 
The Highway Department assisted by hauling approximately US truck loads to the Town Dump. 



36 



Worked Performed for Other Departments ; 

Cemetery Department: Assisted the department with the various projects of hot topping two cemetery roads, 
hot topping Town Park parking lot, installing twelve park benches on the Common, and the construction of 
Elmer Drew Square at the intersection of West and Wobum Streets. 

Tree Department: Loader and truck assisted the department with the removal of large trees. 

Water Department: One man and truck assisted the department with the patching of various streets where new 
water mains were installed. 

Public Buildings Department: Assisted the department with the hot topping of the Wildwood parking lot, the 
bus turnaround on Adams Street, swept all school parking lots, also the welder assisted them on many 
occasions. 

Equipment ; 

The mechanics, foreman and I have checked over the equipment and sincerely conclude we must replace one 
dump tinick, one chassis and cab, one 3/U ton pickup truck, one tractor, stone spreader and one sander body. 
I would like to add another sweeper to the department due to the fact that it is impossible to sweep all the 
streets with one sweeper. 

Brooks and Streams Maintenance : 

As in the past years we used some of the EEA and NYC personnel. Federal sponsored programs, for our 
continuing stream and brook maintenance. 

Snow and Ice Removal : 

Snow and ice removal still remains a major and very expensive problem. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the various departments for the 
cooperation extended this department during 197U, especially the Police Department for keeping us informed 
during the winter months of road conditions between the hoiirs of i4.:00 p.m. to 7:30 a.m., Sundays and 
holidays. To the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last but 
not least, the men of the Highway Department who made 197U a very productive year, my sincere thanks and 
appreciation. 




New Elmer M. Drew Memorial Square constructed by Beautification Committee and Selectmen's project with 
the Highway Department. newly installed park benches. 



37 



Housing Authority 



ORGAITIZATION 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121B of the General Laws, as amended 
MEMBERS 

Mr. George W. Hooper, Chairman 

Mr. Donald R. Garland, Vice Chairmaji 

Miss LuLu Sanborn, Treasurer 

Mr. Leo Woodside, Asst. Treasurer 

Mrs. Barbara H. Larson 

STATUTORY EEFEREITCE 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 of the General Laws, as amended. 

2. Act of providing Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of ^9Sh^ as amendec 



EALAUCE SHEET AS OF SEPTEMBER 30. ^97k 
(As submitted by accountant) 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES 



Debt Service Subsidy 
Debt Service Fund 
Petty Cash 
Administration Funds 
Mechanics Savings Bank 
Development Costs 
Liquidated 
Total 



$575,000 
113,000 



$ 23,38U.6l 
66.00 
25.00 
9,672.87 
5,681.78 

1462,000.00 
$500,830.26 



Modernization 

Matured Interest & Principal 
Debt Service Reserve 
Operating Reserve 
Bonds Authorized $575,000 
Less Notes Retired 113,000 

Total Liabilities 
Operating Deficit 

Total Liabilities & Deficit 



$ 518. -i 

23, 687. C 

2J4,225.C 
1,096.2 

U62,000.C 
$509,33i+.5 

■ Kmzi 

$500,830.2 



During the calendar year 197U, under the Chairmanships of Mr. Raymond Spahl (who resigned in May 197^4-) 
Mrs. Barbar H. Larson and Mr. George W. Hooper, the Wilmington Housing Authority renovated the housing units 
for the elderly on Deming Way. This involved the finishing of the painting of both the interior and exterio 
of the units. 

A study was done on the additional housing needs for those who had applied for elderly housing, and an effor 
has been made with a tentative agreement with DCA for an additional 110 units of elderly housing to be built 
in the near future. 



A further study was conducted to study the needs for scattered site housing for moderate income families, 
a result, we were awarded $350,000 under the #705 Housing Program for the purchases of ten scattered site 
homes in Wilmington. 



A 



To develop a more efficient management for the Wilmington Housing Authority, Mr. Henry E. Borrazzo was 
appointed executive director. The Wilmington Housing Authority Board will continue to improve the safety an 
living conditions for the elderly and work to help the low and moderate income families of Wilmington. 

38 



Board of Health 



Mr. James J. Durkee was elected Chairman of the Board for the period 1971+-1975. During the year Mrs. Abbie 
McQuaid, Public Health Nurse, was placed on a full time basis. Mrs. Eleanor Hovey, Dental Hygienist 
retired. Mrs. Arlene Rybicki, part time clerk resigned. Mrs. Priscilla Ward was hired as clerk to fill the 
vacancy. Mr. Balestrieri was appointed Inspector of Animals. 

The School Department requested the dental facility be relocated from the High School to the Shawsheen 
School. The dental program will commence when the chauige-over is made and a hygienist is employed. 

. . . The board for the second year offered the flu vaccine to anyone over age fifty at a minimal cost. 

. . . The board provided funds for the Lowell Mental Health Association. 

. . . The services of SHAEE and Family Counseling were extended through 197U. 

. . . The board started the task of revising their regulations to update them. 

. . . The board laid the ground work for a lead poison prevention program during the latter part of the year. 

. . . The Health Counseling Program for senior citizens continued to be well received at the DeMoulas 
Shopping Center. 

. . . The board approved a small expenditure of money for the much needed services of a physical therapist. 

. . . The Director of Public Health acted as liaison between Metcalfe & Eddy and the Town relative to the 
development of a sanitary landfill site. 

. . . The board participated in the Head Start Program by administrating a Mantoux Test. 

. . . The board together with the Womens' Club sponsored a Kidney and Diabetes Screening Program at the 
New Eingland Memorial Hospital in the month of May. 

... A new vaccine for protection against measles, mumps, and rubella was made available. Oral polio 
booster vaccine was given to the 5th graders in the school system. 



L. COMMDinCABLE DISEASE 



1. 



Monthly Immunization Clinic 



Attendance 



193 



2. 



Oral Polio Clinic 



Attendance 



388 



3. 



Measles - Mumps - Rubella Clinic 



Attendance 



27 



This new vaccine is now made available at the monthly clinic for pre-school children. 



39 



A. 



COMMmnCABLE DISEASE (continued) 



U. Anti RaMes Clinic 


Dogs Immunized 




5. Flu Vaccine 


Persons Vaccinated 


630 


This program was sponsored and assisted by the Womens' Club. 




6. Industrial Hygiene 


Persons Tuberculin Tested 


19 


7. Tetanus - Diphtheria Clinic 


A 1 1 endance 


75 


This was a "booster clinic for grade XII 


in the schools. 




8. Tuberculosis Control 


New Cases Reported 


1 




Read mi ssion to Hospital 


1 






127 




Grade XII Tested 


75 




Head Start Tested 


62 




PciT*c!/-in CI T'pcs'hpfl in Of'Tir'P 

X CX wXliS X C V CVX XXI \J J- X X 


187 




Home Visits 


77 




1 LKJlLsSj HuLUdlVXCU. X U X X • XJ • O U X UCLX X. £iOr v ^\J1L 


$1+72 


PITBLIC HEALTH TniRSriTfi 






1 • It J. VUict U U-L^ jjJ-J. UilD 




16 




Home Visits 


15 


2. Morbidity Service 


Niirsing Visits 


1,271+ 




Fees Collected 


$327 .'50 


3. Newborn Infants 


Home Visits 


1+7 


k. Dental Home Visits 




10 


5. General Health Supervision 


Home Visits 


551+ 


6, Health Counseling for Senior Citizens 


Number of Sessions 


51 




Attendance 


711 


DENTAL HEALTH 


Children Serviced January to June 


U66 


The dental hygienist retired in 1974- 






ENVIEOimENTAL HEALTH 






1 . Licenses & Perniits 


Sewerage 


166 




Pood 


73 




Milk Vehicle 


12 




Milk Store 


53 




Recreation Camps 


2 




Piggeries 


1 




Funeral Directors 


2 




Refuse T3?ansportation 


28 




Stables 


13 




Installers 


25 




Fees Totalled 


$2,075 


2. Sewage Disposal Sanitation 


Inspections & Investigations 1973-51+2 


197I+- 661 



1+0 



EUTVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (continued) 
3. Solid Waste 

The dump contract expired June 197U. It was extended on a month to month basis. An 
engineering consulting firm was employed to study the solid waste problem and to make 
recommendations to the Town. 

k. Complaints 277 

5. Inspector of Animals Animals Quarantined 59 

Animals Released from Quarantine 59 
Animals Disposed of 211; 
Premises Inspected for Domestic Animals 50 

Mr. Balestrieri was reappointed inspector of animals. 

6. Garbage Contract 

The garbage contract remained in effect through 197U. The board started negotiations 
for a new contract during the latter part of the year. 

7. Food Establishments Permits Issued 73 

Inspections 72 

8. New Regulations 

The board updated its Sewerage and Pood Regulations in 197i|. This was part of the 
overall plan to revise all its regulations. 

9. International Certificates Certified [4.9 

10. Court Appearance in Court 20 

11. Recreation Sanitation Bathing Samples Collected 12 

12. Water Analysis Samples Collected 18 

13. Air Pollution 

The board continued its surveillance of those areas that are most susceptible to 
air pollution. Several meetings were held with the State and local officials in 
this regard. 

SHARE - The board signed a one year contract in 197U for $10,14.00. 

Lowell Mental Health Association - 63 Wilmington clients received treatment. The Tovm Meeting approved 
the expendit\ire of $2^00 for the service of the Lowell Mental Health Association. 

Fami ly Counseling Service - The board signed a one year contract with Family Coimselling ending July 1975. 
They, appropriated $16,000 for this purpose. 



U1 



Public Buildings Department 



Serious areas of concern during 197U were energy problems and the greatly increased cost of materials and 
supplies. 

Fortunately we came through the energy crisis with a minimum of problems and discomfort. Energy measures 
put into effect were lowering thermostats, closing two huildings, maintaining heating equipment, and ensurir 
that the heating equipment worked at the best possible efficiency. With the close cooperation of all 
involved, Wilmington passed through a difficult period with relatively few problems. 

The cost of materials and supplies has risen continuously during 197U. Just as the homeowner has seen the 
costs for maintaining and operating his home increase, so has the cost of operating any one of oui town or 
school buildings increased. Almost daily, price increases arrive ranging from an increase of 10% for light 
bulbs to for toilet tissue to 100% for waste baskets. All these items are bid by various suppliers to 
ensure that the Town gets the lowest price. New sources of supply are continuously soxight, and prices 
constantly checked to get the lowest price. 

Major projects during 197U were construction of new offices on the first floor of the C\irriculum Center 
(Center School), rewiring the Roman House, and building a new office at the Memorial Library. 

The roof repair program started three years ago has been successful. By the end of 1975> building roofs 
should be in good repair. It is planned to continue the present program in order to keep the roof systems 
in first class condition. 

Areas at various buildings were prepared to enable the Beautification Committee to plant flowers. Window 
boxes were also installed on various buildings. 

Tennis courts were completed and received a lot of use during the summer. 

There were eight hundred and eighty-three (883) panes of window glass replaced during ^9^k• Window breakage 
is not confined to any one area of town. 

The Public Buildings Department provided service to each department, board or commission as needed during 
197U. 

My most sincere appreciation to those departments that provided assistance during ^9^h^ 



h2 



Carter Lecture Fund 



On Thursday evening, April 1+, 197U> "the Carter Lecture Fund Committee presented Mr. Norman Baker in THE 
VOYAGES OF THE RAs, a saga of the sea — crossing the Atlantic Ocean twice in boats made of papyrus reeds. 
Mr. Baker's program was most exciting, and he was very enthusiastically received. 

The Carter Committee has made arrangements for a Bicentennial Grand Tour of New England, Mid- Atlantic States, 
fand the South to be presented by Mr. Andre de la Varre, Jr., on Thursday evening, April 17, 1975> a-t 8:15 in 
the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorim. 

It was a time that tried the souls of men. A new nation was being bom. It was not an easy birth. In New 
England the authority of the mother country was being challenged at every turn. The Boston Tea Party. . . 
Concord and Lexington... ftystic and Saybrook. . .Fort Griswold and attempts to build a submarine. 

Things were no better in the Mid-Atlantic States. Saratoga was a battlefield. .. cannons were being forged at 
the Cornwall Furnace. . .battles were being fought over the rolling plains of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 

In the South palmetto logs withstood a bombardment at Sullivan's Island. . .powder was stored in Charleston, 
S. C. at the Provost Dungeon. . .Williamsburg was a prospering village while pirates met to plan their raids 
in what is now the oldest house in Savannah. 

This is only a part of the life and color of the times broTOght to the lecture platform in this new de la 
Varre production. Significant events are re-enacted at their original sites. The elequent and often 
humorous words of men of a bygone era live again throtigh the nairration of Andre de la Varre. 

Magnificent footage coupled with imaginative production techniques are brought together in a film that has 
been honored in its selection as the official film of the Bicentennial Council of the Thirteen Original 
States . 

Bom and raised in Vienna, Andre de la Varre, a graduate of the Vienna Academy of Music, is an award-winning 
producer of theatrical short subjects and of commercial and industrial promotion films. He is best known to 
movie-goers for his series of "GEANB TOUR" travelogues that have been seen and enjoyed by theatre audiences 
from coast-to-coast. Films produced by Mr. de la Varre have been honored at the Venice International Film 
Festival, Industrial Photography Film Festival, and the prestigious Council on International Non- Theatrical 
Events. Otherwise known as the "Golden Eagle" CINE Award, it makes the honored film an automatic official 
entry of the United States in various film competitions held throughout the world. 

jCarter Lecture Committee programs are free and are presented to the residents of Wilmington. 



U3 



Recreation Department 



Communities are finding themselves faced with the ever growing challenge of meeting current and future 
leisure demands. 

With leisiare time on the increase, and with people intensifying their search for more purposeful and self- 
fulfilling piarsuits, the community recreation agency finds itself in the critical role of providing ciirrentl 
acceptable outlets for pleasureable recreation experiences. 

With this purpose in mind, the Wilmington Recreation Department is constantly striving to deliver construc- 
tive and diversified recreation activities to the community with minimal impact on local expenditures. 

The Recreation Department, in its foiirth full year of operation with a Director, submits the following 
breakdown on ^^^h program services: jl 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 1 

Summer Playgrounds ; The summer of '7U proved to be even more popular and successful than the 
"blockbuster" of '73. With registrations again going over the 2,000 mark, the summer playgrovind 
program continued to offer a remarkably diverse calendar of recreation activities for those yoimgsters 
between 6 and 12 years of a^e. Seven school locations were utilized with two leaders, an aide and a 
Neighborhood Youth Corps person, leading and assisting the youth in various games and activities. The 
well-organized schedule of events for each playground included arts n' crafts, drama, tennis instruction 
field trips, family night cookouts, sports and games, inter-playground competition and pool days. 
Special events included: a two day Summer Olympics, co-sponsored by the Knights of Columbus and held 
at the high school track; Wilmington- Wo bum Field Day in Wobum, with Wilmington bussing nearly double 
the n\amber of children that Wobum had present; Beach Day and Swim Meet, co-sponsored by the Police 
Association; Drama Festival at the North Intermediate School Cafeteria; Carnival, feat\iring pony rides, 
moon walk and various games at the Town Park; and the finale - an Arts and Crafts and Back To School 
Fashion Show, with many parents and friends in attendance at the North Intermediate School Cafeteria. 

Special Children's Program : Wilmington is fortunate to have such a successful program for its handi- 
capped youth. Both the summer and winter programs have excelled to the point where they are held in 
high regard and used as models by other aspiring towns. The winter program is operated out of the , 
North Intermediate School on Saturday mornings from Januaiy into April. The summer program is run at J 
the Swain School on a five day a week basis for eight weeks. A staff of thirteen plus several 
Neighborhood Youth Corps personnel, plus many volunteers, work with the over 00 registered youngsters. 
Program content includes: quiet and active games, arts and crafts, music, drama, reading, field trips, 
family night cookouts, pool days, physically corrective activities in the high school gym, ovemi^t 
campouts at Camp Forty Acres, plus involvement in the Summer Olympics and Beach Day/Swim Meet at Silver 
Lake. Staff from similar programs in neighboring towns were hosted to a get-acquainted meeting at the 
Swain School where they were shown the various components making up our program. Fred Cain, throia^ 
the donated use of two station wagons, plus other civic organizations and interested townspeople 
contributed greatly to the measure of success obtained in this program. One-half, or SCP/o, of the total > 
expenditiires incurred by the program are reimburseable from the Commonwealth. 



kk 



Elementary Open Gyms ; Each winter the Recreation Department opens several gyms for the youth of 
Wilmington. Hundreds of young people have the opportunity to participate in gym activities such as 
basketball, floor hockey, tumbling, quiet games and others. The Shawsheen, Wobum and Wildwood gyms 
are open each Saturday morning beginning in December and running throiigh March. Grades 1-3 have from 
9:00 to 10:30 a.m., while grades U - 6 have the gyms from 10:30 to 12:00 noon. Two staff persons 
supervise the activities at each location. 

Intercaediate Open Gyms : This Saturday afternoon gym program has increased in numbers of participants 
since its inception. Both the North and West Intermediate gyms are open for intermediate school youth 
on Sat\irday afternoons from 1:00 to U:00 p.m. Gym activities such as floor hockey, basketball, volley- 
ball, tumbling and tag games prove to be most popular for this age group. The program, which runs from 
December through March, utilizes three staff people at each location. 

Teen Open Gym : Prom December through March, the Wobum Street School gym was available on Saturday 
afternoons from 1:00 to UiOO p.m. for teenage youth. Two staff persons supervised the activities which 
consisted mainly of basketball scrimmages and floor hockey. 

Flag Football : Boys and girls ages 9 through 12 participated in a league schedule with games being 
played on Monday evenings under the lights at the Town Park. The program which runs from September 
through November, is supervised and coordinated by volunteer personnel who devote much time and effort 
in providing this worthwhile, active team sport. 

An older boys' division, for those ages 13 to 16, was added this year. Their games were played on 
Sat\irday and Sunday afternoons, also at the Town Park. 

Soccer : The Recreation Department sponsors two teams in the spring, which participate in the Boston 
Area Youth Soccer League. The two teams play a competitive schedule of games against teams from towns 
and cities in this general area. The "AA" team, comprised of Wilmington boys \inder age 19, won their 
divisional crown as did our "B" team entry of boys ages II4. and under. Dual championships of this kind 
are a remarkable accomplishment. Much credit should go to the volunteer coaches who worked with their 
boys over the spring season. 

Soccer clinics were provided for those in grade 1 through adulthood during the week of August 26 to 30. 
Each day yoimgsters in grades 1 through 6 met from 10:00 to 12:00 noon at the North Intermediate School. 
Grades 7 to 9 participated from 2:00 to lj.:00 p.m. while the older group met each evening from 6:00 to 
8:00 p.m. Instruction on individiial and team play plus knowledge of the game, conduct, and scrimmages 
made up the clinic's content. 

Baseball : During the summer, the Recreation Department sponsors a baseball team for those boys ages 
15 to 18 years of age. The team plays in the Northeast Baseball League and is coached and managed by 
volunteers. 

Softball : Nearly 100 girls between ages 13 to I6 participated in the junior division of the summer 
Softball league. This intratown league played its scheduled games at the Town Park. The traveling 
team, or intertown team, which competed in the Northwest Suburban Girls Softball League, finished in 
third place. For the second simmer in succession, Wilmington hosted this league's toximament at the 
Town Park. 

The older girls team, comprised of those a^s I7 and over, competed in the Northwest Suburban League 
and played its home games at the Town Park. 

The boys' league, for those ages I3 to 17, had nearly 100 participants and played an extensive intertown 
schedule with games being played at the Town Park. 

In two years the number of participants in these summer soft ball leagues has more than doubled. All 
coaches volunteer their services. 

Tennis ; Besides having tennis instruction as part of the summer playground program, the Recreation 
Department sponsored a "Twelve to Twenty" tennis tournament during the week of August I9 to 23. Singles 
play was set up for both males and females in two separate divisions. In each division, trophies were 
awarded to first and second place finishers in the following age groups: 12-14, 15-17» 18-20. 



h5 



Basketball ; The Recreation Basketball Lea^e, for the first time, included girls in its regular 
schedule of games. Over l\.00 people ages 9 sucid over competed in their respective divisions. League 
games were played on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Wednesdays in the High School gym. The league, one 
of the more extensive leagues of its kind in this area, ran from December through March. 

Practices for girls on league teams took place on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. in the 
Shawsheen School gym. Practices for boys involved in the league took place on Thursday evenings from 
6:00 to 8:00 p.m. in the West Intermediate School gym. 

A basketball clinic was conducted by Don Nelson of the Boston Celtics on Satiirday, November 30, in the 
High School gym. Many youth and adults were present to receive valuable tips on team and individual 
play. 

The i+th Annual Recreation Basketball Tournament followed the conclusion of the Basketball League. The 
toirmament lasted one week and was enthusiastically received, especially due to the admission of girls' 
teams for the first time. 

The Annual Basketball Banquet was held on Sunday morning, April 28 in the Kni^ts of Columbus Hall. 
Over 200 youth and coaches attended this breakfast banquet. Coaches, division all-stars, and league 
supervisors were awarded trophies and recognition plaques. 

Bowling ; In January, the Recreation Department initiated an after school program for $th and 6th 
graders from the Shawsheen, Wildwood, and Wobtim Street Schools. The bowlers participated once a week 
at Pleasure Lanes in North Reading. Bus transportation was provided to and from the lajies. Also 
included in the $1.6^ per person charge was the use of shoes, instruction, supervision, three strings o 
bowling, personal bowling shirt and a chance to win many trophies. School bowling roll-off s were held 
with Shawsheen School winning the team trophy. A picnic and puppet show was held at Camp Forty Acres 
in June as a conclusion to this very rewarding and successful program. A summer bowling program for 
those in grades 5 thro\x^ 12 was held on Monday and Tuesday afternoons also at Pleasure Lanes. The 
Ih/l^ bowling program has expanded to include grades U through 12. Over 500 yoimg people participate 
in this enormous program which is run each day after school. 

Town Beach : During the summer the two town beaches at Silver Lake are staffed with Red Cross certified 
lifeguards. These people provide valuable supervision to the majiy town residents of all ages who 
utilize the beach facilities. 

Swimming lessons for beginners, ages 6 through 9» are offered throughout the summer. These free lesson 
are well received and there is always a waiting list. Senior life saving lessons were offered to teens 
and adults for the first time. These classes were held in the evening and resulted in many people 
receiving certification to become a lifeguard. 

Girls Ice Hockey : Wilmington Recreation produced its first girls' ice hockey team and helped form the 
Merrimac Valley Girls' Ice Hockey League. Girls ages 12 and over were eligible to participate in this 
intertown league which ran from November of '73 "bo March of '7i+- League games were played on Monday 
evenings. Due to the number of girls registering for the program, an additional team was formed. 
These girls played sunrounding towns when possible. During the summer, fouj? intramural teams were 
formed for girls ages 10 to 18. Their games were played on Wednesday evenings. The 71+/75 season began 
in October and will run through March. Nearly i^O girls have participated in league and non-league play 

Santa's Workshop : Response to our 3^*1 Annual Santa's Workshop was even greater than expected as nearly 
600 little boys and girls visited Santa and his elves at the Mildred Rogers School. All young visitors 
to this North Pole replica were able to give Santa their Christmas wishes and received a candy cane, a 
Christinas balloon, and a color polaroid snapshot on Santa's lap. The huge success of this unique 
offering could be easily measured in the eyes of the many youngsters who visited Santa and his elves. 

Christmas Trees Around the World ; The Public Library was utilized for the displaying of four Christmas 
trees. Each tree was decorated by a different youth group according to their chosen country's customs. 
The trees were left on display over the holiday season. 



he 



others: The Recreation Department involves itself in many other recreational activities for the youth 
of the town, some of which are: Celtics trip, punt/pass and kick contest, dajices, ballroom dancing, 
Horribles Parade, Easter egghunt, Memorial marathon, twilight soccer, elementary sports, concerts, 
vacation gym programs, films, Christmas Pageant and student government day. 

U)ULT PROGRAMS 



Men's Open Gym ; Men ages 18 and over are offered this chance to engage in healthful physical activity 
of their choosing. The West Intermediate gym is utilized for this program each Thiirsday evening from 
October through March. Basketball scrimmages highlight this winter activity. 

Ladies' Slimnastics ; Ladies ages 18 and over participated each Tuesday evening in these body slimming 
classes at the High School gym. The program ran from November of '73 to March of '7U. 

Co-ed Volleyball ; Men and women ages 18 and over were able to compete together on an informal basis. 
The North Intermediate gym was utilized on Thursday evenings through March and is used on Wednesday 
evenings currently through March of 'TS- 

Basketball ; Over 100 men ages 18 and over compete in the Recreation Basketball League during the winter 
and nearly 100 in the summer league. All games are played in the High School gym. 

Ladies' Open Gym ; Ladies ages 18 and over are eligible to participate in gym activities of their choice 
each Tuesday evening in the Wobum Street School gym. Basketball practice proves to be the most popular 
activity. 

Ballroom Dancing ; This new cultural offering for adult couples has received an overwhelming show of 
support. The first class begun in February resulted in over 100 couples wishing to join. Since the 
first class several additional classes have been offered including beginner, intermediate and advanced 
classes. 

Softball ; The Men's Recreation Softball League is open to those men, ages 18 and over, who live or 
work in Wilmington. The league continues to grow and excel in quality. League games are played under 
the lights at the Town Park several evenings of the week during the summer. 

Men's Gym Hockey ; This new activity for men ages 18 and over took place on Tuesday evenings in the 
High School gym. This informal, active team sport ran from December through March. 

Others ; Additional program activities involving the Recreation Department are: tennis tournaments , 
Memorial marathon, men's ice hockey, plus town beach and park supervision. 

CTIOR CITIZENS 



The Recreation Department enjoyed its role in serving the senior citizens of Wil mi ngton. Under the 
auspices of the Recreation Department, the senior citizens became increasingly involved and aware of 
their community at large. Many programs were offered and expanded. With the opening of the first 
Senior Citizens Drop- In-Center, a new era of opportunity for the seniors began. Under the guidance of 
the Council on Aging, the senior set surely has a bright future. 

iOMMUNITY YOUTH 



Several youth organizations in town receive partial financial support through the Recreation Department 
budget. These excellent programs are run by interested volunteers who devote their time to helping our 
younger people receive enjoyment through recreation activity. These organizations are Youth Hockey, 
Figure Skating Club, Pop Warner, Senior Little League and Pony League. 



'roviding a well diversified progi'am of leisure recreation offerings is a town-wide funtion. Much support 
s necessary for the fvilfillment of our programs. The Recreation Commi ssion and Director thank those public 
nd private citizens plus the many civic and fraternal organizations for their generous support in helping 
;o provide a well-ro\mded program of recreation activities for the town. 



U7 



Water & Sewer Department 



POMPING STATISTICS 



WATER SUPPLY 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Day 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Week 

Maximum Gallons 
Per Month 

Average Gallons 
Per Day 

Average Gallons 
Per Month 

Total Gallons 
Per Year 



1970 



U,7U7,ooo 



mi 



U,6U7,000 



mi 



3,796,000 



Jill 



U, 370,000 



mk 



i+,120,0( 



25,712,000 26,297,000 21,765,000 23,202,000 23,961,0( 

95,302,000 94,268,000 89,097,000 91,i4+8,000 97,i|Ol+,Oi 



2,583,000 



2,530,000 



2,1|8U,000 



2,62U,000 



2,557,0( 



78,5ii9,000 76,973,000 75,569,000 79,838,000 77,790,0( 

9U2,598,000 923,678,000 906,833,000 958,051,000 933, 478, Ot 



CONSUMPTION STATISTICS - 197U 



Total Water Metered 
Total Water Not Metered* 
Industrial Water Metered 
Commercial Water Metered 
Industrial & Commercial Combined 
Residential Water Metered 



719,321,519 
21i;,l56,U8l 
U2U,908,192 
19,559,730 
IM,U67,U22 
27l+,851+,097 



77% of Water Pumped 
23% of Water Pumped 
59% of Water Metered 
y/o of Water Metered 
62% of Water Metered 
38% of Water Metered 



* This water was used for main flushing, fires, miscellaneous Town needs and leakage. 



U8 



PTMPIITG CAPACITY 



I The safe yield of oux eight piamping stations is now approximately 6,000,000 gallons per 2i+ hour day. 
However, two pumping stations. Butters Row and Aldrich Road, with a comMned yield of 1,700,000 gallons per 
2I4 hour day, are shut down due to high iron and manganese content, leading to "dirty water" complaints. This 
leaves a total of about i;, 300,000 gallons per day available on a 2h hour pumping basis. 

Ihiring the rain deficient months of June, July and Axigust, and in spite of partial restrictions in the use of 
water for lawn sprinkling, there were times when the standpipes were dangerously low. A dry summer in 1975 
may require a ban on all outside use of water. 

This condition was anticipated by the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners, and engineering investigations 
were initiated in I969 leading to an article in the Town Meeting of March 9> 197U» for $2,000,000 to design 
and construct a water treatment plant for Town Park, Butters Row and Chestnut Street pumping stations. The 
article was soundly defeated due to lack of support by affected users and public officials. 

Investigations are being continued to augment supplies from soTirces within the Town. Ciirrently, testing of 
another well off Salem Street has been delayed pending decisions from the State Department of Public Health 
that may require the removal of a small area contaminated by oil residue from the old town d\uiip. 

Also, investigations are contintiing relative to obtaining water from sources outside of the Town, such as 
the Metropolitan District Commission, the Ipswich River Watershed District and the Town of Andover. Meetings 
have been held with representatives of North Reading relative to sharing in an MDC pipeline now planned to 
North Reading, and meetings were held with Tewksbuiy people to discuss possibilities of a share in the MDC 
pipeline by Tewksbury. Andover is studying the question of supplying water to Wilmington and other towns, 
but no answers are available at this time. 

It is obvious that the long term requirements of Wilmington must be met from regional supplies outside the 
Town, because sufficient water is not available in Wilmington either from ground water (wells) or surface 
sources. 

It is probable that a water treatment plant or plants will be required to use the ground water sources we 
now have as an interim solution until such time as a regional source becomes available, and then to augment 
that source. 

Whatever the solution, it will be costly, initially and annually, and rate increases are a certainty. 
rfATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM 



North Wilmington Improvements 

Phe March 9 Town Meeting voted a bond issue of $500,000 to add new 12" water mains to the present inadequate 
5" mains in Ballardvale and Andover Streets and tie the two with a cross-connection through Upton Court. 
Ehe project was delayed three months pending decisions affecting the selection of the engineer. Detailed 
field surveys for location and land descriptions and detailed engineering and cost estimates were started 
Ln June and completed in November. In the meantime due to the inflation spiral, total estimated costs had 
risen more than U0% to something over $700,000! 

Phe Commissioners decided to proceed with the Andover Street main only since there was no land taking 
involved and funds were available. Bids were received on December S, 197U» and construction will proceed 
*ith delivery of materials, weather permitting. 

En order to complete the Ballardvale main and cross- tie, the Commissioners will seek the permission of the 
Town at the March 1975 meeting to acquire the necessary right-of-way easements and to borrow the additional 
^200,000. This main and cross-tie, together with the Andover Street main, is a very important addition to 
the system, not only to benefit present industrial ajid residential consiimers, but to enco\irage more 
Industrial tax base in the future, and to provide the basic connection for a large water tank or standpipe 
bo be constructed in the future. 



U9 



General Distribution System Additions and Improvements 



About 3 miles of new mains were added as follows: 
By Builders : 
Street 

Broad Street 
Anthony Avenue 
Freeport Drive 
Heather Drive 
Lucaya Circle 
Glen Pines Estates 
Glen Pines Estates 
Carmel Street 
Morgan Street 
Fletcher Lane 
Roosevelt Road 
Franklin Street 
Blackstone Street 
Melrose Avenue 

Under the Betterment Act ; 

Jaquith Road 
Brattle Street 

As Improvements to the System : 

Fay Street 



Size of Main 



10 

10 

10 

10 
8" 
8- 
6 
8" 
8" 
6" 
6" 
6" 
6" 
2 



6" 
6" 



6" 



Number of Feet 

hSo' 

kOO' 
2050' 
1300' 
2900' 
261+0' 

560' 

U1il' 

6i|0' 
800' 

U50' 

800' 
200' 



350- 
600' 



650' 



36 new hydrants and 11+2 new services and meters were added to the system. 



WATER QUALITY 



Studies to determine methods of alleviating the staining characteristics of the water supply have resulted ; 
a preliminary estimate of $50 - $75 per day for chemicals and labor and over $2,000 per station for equipmei 
This equipment is intended primarily to correct the current acidity and corrosiveness of the water and will 
not solve the problem of excess iron which requires complete treatment facilities mentioned before. The 
commissioners have decided not to install the equipment until decisions are made concerning the installatioi 
of the iron treatment plants and/or the use of outside water. 

GENERAL 

Water rates were increased 50% by the Commissioners on March 197Ui did not become wholly effective 

until the fall billing. There was some criticism by the Board of Selectmen of the step-rate system, some 
feeling that the same unit price should be charged all consumers regardless of the amoimt used. The Water 
Board feels the step rate system is fair to the large users because it is like any "wholesale" rate, and it 
is cheaper to provide almost any product in large quantities. The Water Board also feels that the system 
can be simplified and studies of the rate system will continue. 



50 



SEWERS 



Silver Lake Interceptor 

Engineering for the sewer system on the west side of town, known as the Silver Lake Interceptor, was ahout 
75% complete at the "beginning of the year, when work was halted because of a hold-up in government funds 
needed to complete right-of-way descriptions. The Silver Lake Interceptor extends from the present trunk 
sewer at Eames Street and will continue to the vicinity of the Charles River Laboratories on Ballardvale 
Street. Its planned route along Salem Street is in the vicinity of the proposed high school and could save 
very substantial sums for the construction of waste treatment facilities at the school site. It is intended 
to complete the engineering work on this as soon as the funds can be made available. 



Lowell Street Sewer Connection 

Meetings were held with representatives of a developer of a low- income apartment complex near Concord Street 
who proposes to install a sewer at his own expense to the existing sewer on Wobum Street near Avco. Since 
the proposed sewer does not meet the requirements of the planned sewers for the area, the Board has asked 
for alternative proposals. Plans for the construction of a regional health center also raise questions 
about sewer installation in the area. The possibility of reconsidering enlargement of the existing high 
school is becoming apparent at this writing. Sewers to serve the high school and the center of town connect 
to a trunk sewer on Lowell Street, and although the planning for the connector from the new Route 129 bridge 
to Route 93 has been delayed, there is no doubt that it will be built. This new route will involve the 
rebuilding and widening of Lowell Street, and new sewers should be installed before this occurs. 

The time has arrived to develop detailed plans for at least the trunk sewers to serve the west, central and 
east portions of the town. Laterals serving particular areas can be installed as the need arises. 

The sewer and water programs mentioned will be costly but they must be considered and given the proper 
priority with other expensive and necessaiy programs facing the town. 

Historical Commission 



In Hew England our nation has many of its roots. Here national ideals were formed and grew strong. Owe 
: cities, towns and co\antryside show the physical record of that growth, a varied and rich heritage of places 
sand b^lildings to which thousands upon thousands of Americans turn each year, consciously or unconsciously, 
1 in search of identity and an imderstanding of whom we are through an experience of what we have been. 

o; though New Englanders take our cultural and architectiiral inheritance for granted and tend to go about 
changing and also destroying it for "good practical reasons," the time has come for sustained thought and 
effort toward preservation of the historically valuable parts of our urban and rural past, not only for 
ftmericans as a whole but especially to improve the qiiality of life for those of us who live here. 

i/e are coming to realize that the atmosphere and aspect of other times can be much better appreciated in 
total surro-undings rather than in individual buildings; hence the Massachusetts law setting up the legal 
concept of Historic Districts. Every town should ask: what areas, such as the Common and its buildings or 
• the I8th and 19th cent\iry structures along Main Street have enough unity, beauty, and importance to be 
,t preserved as an Historic District? Occasionally a whole town such as Harrisville, New Hampshire, or the 
Island of Nantucket may constitute such a \mique entity as to merit total preservation. Usually the 
significant part of a present day town will be limited, and may well be preserved and appropriately changed 
for present day needs through historic district control. 

Careful and thoiightful control of demolition, alteration and new construction is essential, along with 
studied consideration of traffic movement, signs, utility lines and landscaping, if our towns are to remain 
prosperous and liveable and individual. 

Ehe Historical Commission is grateful for the support of the citizens of Wilmington and the assistance it 
tias received from various other departments, committees, and boards in attempting to hold on to otir past. 



51 



Cemetery Department 



Burials in 197U : 



Receipts ; 



Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elswhere 

Non-residents 

Babies 

Cremations 



9 

57 



Setting markers 
Affidavits 



Interments 
Liners sold 
Foundations 



$5,875 
1,883 
1,102 
255 



121 



26 

$9,11+1 



Trust Fund; 



Reserve: 



Perpetual Care 



$5,750 



Sale of lots 
Ref\md on lots 



$9,121 

m 

$9,051 



The department was busy throTighout the year maintaining all the areas under its care. The cemetery was mowe» 
and raked regularly, along with the old cemetery adjacent to the Congregational Church, the town common, tow 
park, the veteran's parks and Rotary Park. The Hamden Tavern has also been designated to the care of the 
Cemetery and Parks Department and was cared for diiring the year. Town beaches were kept clear of debris andi 
fencing was installed at the newly acquired strip along Grove Avenue, which is to be used for recreation. 
The triangle of town-owned land at the intersection of West and Wobum Streets was renovated and landscaped. 
Drew Square was relocated at this site. The sign, monument and shrubs were moved from the original spot at 
West and Lowell Streets, and a new planting was set out behind the monument. 

A banner announcing town meetings was suspended across Church Street. A wind storm during March blew down a* 
large spruce tree. It was cleared away along with other limbs and debris throughout the cemetery. Electric 
door openers were installed at the truck garage. The ditch forming the boundary line between cemetery land 
and the Bennett property was cleared of debris, and a drain pipe was installed at the narrow gauge 
passageway. j| 

A number of sunken graves and lots were refixrbished. Aluminum lot markers and numbers were purchased and 
installed in place of the old cement ones. A new area, section J, covering approximately 58,225 square feet 
was made ready for family lots. It was arranged in four and six grave lots. The water main was extended 
into the area, and two of the avenues were hot topped. Brush and wood was cleared to make room for f^orther 
expansion. A large dozer was hired to move rough fill and to remove a number of stumps. Fill was hauled in 
by cemetery trucks and graded with the front-end loader. 

The elementary schools held memorial services on the Veteran's lot, Friday May 2k. This has previously been 
done in the schools. Three boys, sponsored by the Neighborhood Youth Corp, worked part of the summer in the 
cemetery. Boy Scout Walter Seppi, Wilmington Troop I36, worked for six hours last summer trimming and 
edging around veteran's markers in the cemetery. He needed a project to earn a scouting rank and was grante' 
permission to perform this task. His work was most satisfactoiy. 

Sincere thanks are extended to all town officials for their cooperation and to the employees of the various 
departments for their assistance during the year. 



52 



I 



Redevelopment Authority 



Successful endeavors have been achieved by the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority in the disposal of the 
property known as Eames Street Industrial Park. On July 22, 197U» the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 
entered into a contract with Jewell Manufacturing Company of Tewksbury, Mass. for the purchase and sale of 
approximately 30 •78? acres of land at a price of $375*000, the results of which should show an immediate 
profit to the Town of approximately $200,000. 

Jewell Manufacturing Company was selected on the basis of their qualifications and financial resources 
necessary to acquire and develop the land in accordance with the Urban Renewal Plan. The contract was 
approved by the State Department of Conmunity Affairs. 

The Wilmington Redevelopment Authority expects to consummate the contract sometime in the early spring of 
1975. In the interim, the Authority is assisting Jewell Manufacturing in expediting their plans for the 
development of the land by aiding them in any proceedings with the various Boards. At the present time, 
Jewell Manufacturing has several prospective clients interested in commencing negotiations for the acqui- 
Isition of various parcels of land in the Industrial Park. 

The Redevelopment Authority welcomed two new members during 197U» Carl A. Backman, Jr. on March 18 who. was 
elected for a term of five years, and Mrs. Ciorrie N. Johnson on May 13 as the State-appointed member for a 
term of five years. The resignation of Mrs. Joan Harlow was regretfully accepted by the Authority in J\Hie 
of 197U« She seized in the capacity of administrative assistant and had been with the WRA since its 
formation seven years ago. Mrs. Betsy Cullen was subsequently employed as the new secretary to the Authority 
in June of 197i|. 

The Wil mi ngton Redevelopment Authority is pleased to have served the community in fulfilling its objectives 
in the disposal of the Eames Street property and is appreciative of the assistance received by the various 
Boards . 

Members of the Authority are: Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman and Secretary, Term Expires 1976; William F. 
Butt, Vice-chairman, Term Expires 1977; Carl A. Backman, Jr., Acting Director, Assistant Treasurer, Term 
Expires 1979; Sidney R. Kaizer, Treasurer, Term Expires 1978; Mrs. Currie N. Johnson, State-Appointed Member, 
Term Expires 1979. 



53 



Conservation Commission 



The 197i| calendar year was another full one for the Wilmington Conservation Connnission. Activities ranged 

from holding public hearings under the Wetlands Protection Act to land improvement and clean-ups. Included 

also were many meetings with other town boards and concerned citizens on the multiple problems which face 
our growing town. 

Wetlands Protection Act 

With the new revision of the Wetlands Protection Act, Chapter 131» Section l^O of the General Laws, more 
responsibility and authority was granted to the local Conservation Commission. We hope this will allow us 
to provide more efficient and protective procedures in the regulatory use of the water holding areas of 
Wilmington. In addition to the Wetlands Protection Act public hearings that were held, the commission also 
made numerous inspections of property in the Town to determine if the land fell under the jurisdiction of 
the Wetlands Act. This was done at the request of the property owner or due to citizen complaint of 
probable violation. In cases of severe violation, a "Cease and Desist Order" was issued by the commission. 

Public Education 

The Conservation Commission feels that public education is an on-going concern. Some of this year's 
contributions follow: 

1 . Our annual donation of books and magazine subscriptions to the Wilmington Memorial Library. 

2. Three yo\ing men from Wilmington were sent to Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp for 
two weeks. 

3. The Conservation Commission advised and supported the high school students and faculty in 
their successful establishment of a monthly re-cycling program. 

U. The commission aided and supported the beautifi cation and clean-up at the West Intermediate 
School. 

5. We have begun working jointly with the librarian. Science and Art Departments and school 
administration planning for a nature trail and outdoor classroom on the property behind 
the libraiy. 

Perhaps the most significant of these activities was the beautification program at the West Intermediate 
School. It demonstrated to the school's faculty and students and their families that major changes can be 
brought about when someone takes the initiative and groups work co-operatively. This project began when the 
West Intermediate Counselor, Mr. Richard Malcolm, and a delegation of Student Coimcil members asked the 
commission for aid and advice in their desire to improve the school groxmds. Student, faculty and commissio 
members worked together d\iring both the planning and planting stages. The woodworking instructor and 
volunteer students built several planters, both bucket and trough- type, which were planted with small ever- 
greens and annual flowers. The art students painted posters and landscape plans showing the completed 
landscaping project. About 1^0 students, all the faculty and members of the Parent Advisory Committee, alon 
with commission members volunteered their labor. Approximately 50 shrubs and evergreens were planted along 
the school's facade. The front lawns were loamed and re-seeded. Curbs and walks were repaired. As an 
Arbor Day program, a white dogwood tree was planted. The Highway Department supplied trucks to remove litte 
and trash. The Grounds and Building Department gave us the use of rakes and shovels in large quantity. In 
all, it was a successful program in which many groups shared their talents and efforts to the school's 
benefit. We thank everyone involved for their help and cooperation. 

5U 



Land Improvement 



The commission effected two land improvement programs this year: One, on the conservation land at the end 
of Westdale Avenue and Oxford Avenue; the second, on the former Alderwood Estates III property at the end of 
Kenwood Avenue. 

The Westdale Avenue project was a joint neighborhood and commission effort. The pond was cleared of 
discarded refrigerators, washers and other trash. The banks were also cleared of litter, and the overgrown 
brush and dead tree limbs removed. Some large boulders were covered, and a cleared area was leveled to be 
used as a neighborhood play area. Landscaping improvements were begun with the planting of shrubs and low 
growing evergreens. Later in the suimner, the pond weeds were cut below the water level by a neighborhood 
group, so that skating would be more pleasant this winter. We thank everyone for their labor and efforts in 
this project. 

Our second land improvement project was to begin landscape repair at the end of Kenwood Avenue on the former 
Alderwood Estates III property acquired in 197U. An already ponded area was improved by contouring the 
banks, filling in deep ruts and covering large boulders left on the property by the previous owner. It now 
provides an attractive pond and skating area. The access area to the pond was also improved by leveling the 
ground. Further landscaping is planned for Spring 1975* 

Inter- Board Activities ; 

The commission worked jointly with the Recreation Commission in our concern to protect many town-ovmed parcels 
in the Master Plan proposed Town Forest area, from industrial encroachment. We consulted with the Planning 
Board on their programs and gave opinions to the selectmen on the sale of various town-owned parcels of land. 
The commission also consulted with the Wilmington Regional Health Center, on their proposed development plans. 

lAs Wilmington has a definitive Flood Plain Zoning By-Law and Map, the town is eligible for National Flood 
jPlain Insurance. A dossier of needed infomation was compiled by the commission and sent to the Town 
Mana^r's office for his use in completing the necessary forms for application by the Town. This will allow 
townspeople to purchase flood insurance very inexpensively. 

Mr. Thomas MacFeeley's Boy Scout Troop held a winter camp-out on conseirvation land located off Aldrich Road. 
As a part of their scouting activities, they undertook a clean-up of Lubbers' Brook and its banks where it 
flows through the property. We thank them for their efforts. Later in the year, a commission member, 
Mr. Arthur Bureau, attended the troop's meeting as a guest speaker. He spoke on conservation and the 
coimnission' s role in protecting natural resources throu^ public education and the use of environmental laws. 

The Conservation Commission attempts to be responsive to the needs of the community while protecting its 
natural character and resources. We thank all the citizens of Wil mi ngton, town employees and government 
officials for their aid, support and interest in our programs. 




Special Memorial Day exercises by grade five of ttie Swain School. 

55 



Jury List 



(*Indicates Married Woman) 
(Revised - August 1, 197h) 



NAME RESIDENCE OCCUPATION 



Aalerud, Robert W, 


365 WDburn Street 


Experimental Machinist 


Albanese, Donald A. 


9 King Street 


Journey-man Carpenter 


Alexander, Kenneth C . 


35 Burnap Street 


Gas Station Attendant 


Allen, Frankline E. 


86 Burlington Avenue 


Contract Cons\jltant 


•K-All grove, Evelyn 


311 Middlesex Avenue 


Shipper, Receiver 


Allison, Norman C. 


k2 Swain Road 


Factory Rep. 


Ames, Dennis W. 


16 Corey Avenue 


Machinist 


Amicangioli, Mary I, 


28 Fairmeadow Road 


Bookkeeper 


■Ji-Anderson, Elizabeth L. 
Andrews, Philip T. 


276 Lowell Street 


Student 


20 Gunderson Road 


Unemployed 


•x-Aprile, Elizabeth A. 


k3 Marcia Road 


At Home 


Ardolino, Ernest E. 


1 Broad Street 


Foreman 


Armstrong, Rosemarie 


110 Woburn Street 


Manager 


Aruda, Frances E. 


15 McDonald Road 


Assembler 


Ashley, James E, Jr. 


17 Fay Street 


Controller 


■5;-Bachman, Joan M. 


10 Marie Drive 


Housewife 


Baker, James D. 


Ih Oakridge Circle 


Field Auditor 


Baker, Wesley H. 


k Cedar Street 


Ink Base Mixer Operator 


Baldwin, Charles J. 


11 Jones Avenue 


Research Machinist 


^!-Barry, Kathleen A. 


8 Chandler Road 


Housewife 


Barry, Thomas F. 


130 Grove Avenue 


Senior Tel. Clerk 


Bartnick, Bruce S. 


33 Marion Street 


Production Manager 


Bennett, Gertrude H. 


2k9 Middlesex Avenue 


Secretary 


Beatrice, Lawrence E. 


6 Radcliff Road 


Personnel Manager 


Begonis, Martin S. 


12 Cedar Street 


Foreman 


■K-Bellissdjtio, Dorothea J . 


6 Carson Avenue 


Clerk of Courts 


Berger, Frederick D. 


9h Wobiirn Street 


Asst. Office Gr. 


Bergman, Paul Christopher 


21 Shady Lane Drive 


Uneirployed 


Bickmore, Robert F. 


3 Loumac Road 


Engineer 


Bimbo, James F. 


35 Beeching Avenue 


Maintenance Machinist 


Blackburn, Alfred S . 


33 Concord Street 


General Electric Co. 


Blake, Arnold C. 


90 Middlesex Avenue 


Civil Engineer 


Blue, Qiarles M. 
Brady, Bernard F. 


336 Chestnut Street 


Buyer 


3 Roberts Road 


Dir. Safety/ Security 


•KBreaky, Barbara K, 


63 Middlesex Avenue 


Secretary 


Breen, Thomas J. 


77 Middlesex Avenue 


Unemployed 


•Kfiurke, Evelyn S. 


1 Harris Street 


P. T. Clerk 


Bums, Robert A. 


2 Lockwood Road 


Repairman 


■K-Burt, Lorraine B. 
Carney, Mary B. 


k Carson Avenue 


P. T. Secretary 


288 Siawsheen Avenue 


Unemployed 



56 



RESIDENCE 



OCCUPATION 



29 Adams Street 

26 North Street 
8 Linda Road 
11 den Road 

8 Cedar Street 

23 Floradale Avenue 
k Hathaway Road 
2k Lloyd Road 

9 Shady Lane Drive 
17 Frederick Drive 
15 Main Street 

27 Richmond Street 
11 Brattle Street 
5 Marie Drive 

291 Woburn Street 
l5 Belmont Avenue 
i; Pond Street 
56 Federal Street 
38 Oakdale Road 
71 Grove Avenue 
3 Woodland Drive 

17 Oakdale Road 
11 Birchwood Road 
8 Mass Avenue 

20 Birchwood Road 
2li Linda Road 
126 Burlington Avenue 
11 Adams Street 
Atlantic Avenue 

30 Marion Street 
281 Main Street 

2 Muse Avenue 
98 Aldrich Road 
lii Linda Road 

7 Marion Street 

18 Strout Avenue 
353 Woburn Street 
I4.5 Church Street 
32 Glen Road 

2k Gimderson Road 
118 Nichols Street 
27 Shady Lane Drive 
71; Glen Road 
1 Pilling Road 
I3A Parker Street 
17 Linda Road 
7 Powderhouse Circle 
298 Salem Street 
288 Salem Street 
100 Andover Street 
lA State Street 
29 Dadant Drive 
k Davis Road 
875 Main Street 
875 Main Street 

3 Ridge Road 



Contract Engineer 
Secretary 

Toll Service Assigner 

Unemployed 

Rail Machine Opr. 

Realtor & Tax Examiner 

Mass. Bay Authority 

Bartender 

Intake Secretary 

SupejTvisor 

Sr. Technician 

Q. C. Inspector 

Foreman 

Sr. ELec. Designer 
Lab. Tech. 

Secretary 

Salesman 

Tile Setter 

W. T. Grants 

Housewife 

Manager 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Q. C. Inspector 

Transcriber 

Housewife 

Asst. Mgr. Spec. 

Iron Worker 

Truck Driver 

Elec. Grp. Ldr. 

Self -employe d 

Salesman 

Web Pressman 

P. T. Clerk 

Plant Engineer 

Director 

Prod. Control 

Housewife 

Homemaker 

Installer 

Personnel Mgr. 

Saitison's "U95" 

Unemployed 

Metagraphic Tech. 

N.E. Tel. & Tel. 

Inspector 

Equip. Installer 

Service Manager 

Tmick Driver 

Cleaning Service 

Analyst 

Salesman 

Shipping & Receiving 
Library Asst. 
Truck Driver 
Res . Claims Adj . 



57 



J\iry List ; (continued) 

NAME RESIDENCE OCCUPATION 



Landers, Harry J. 


88 Clark Street 


Ins. Broker 


Laughton, Rodney E. 


31 Adams Street 


Field Ser. Eng. 


Lavrrenson, Charles P. 


55 Swain Road 


Ind. Developer Dir./ Eng. 


Leavitt, Kenneth R. 


k Pleasant Street 


Foreman 


Leyden, William P. 


10 Shady Lane Drive 


Plant Super, 


■5<-Lounsbviry, Evelyn E. 


28 Shady Lane Drive 


Housewife 


Low, James 


585 Woburn Street 


Broker 


Lux, Ralph A. 


7 Biggar Avenae 


Lexington Federal Savings 


Lurvey, Alvan R. 


18 Hopkins Street 


Sr. Layout Artist 


MacDonald, Linda M. 


16 Oakdale Road 


G-S-i;, Int. Revenue 


^J-Mahoney, Anne M. 
Malek, Stanley W, 


39 Oakdale Road 


Housewife 


i; Allan Park Drive 


Merchandiser 


Marini, Edison F. 


3h Shady Lane Drive 


Eng. Fac. Coordinator 


■«Masse, Maxine M. 
■^McCarthy, Marilyn 


19 Carter Lane 


Packer 


Ik Birchwood Road 


Switchboard Oper. 


*McGinn, Carolyn 


27 Fair view Avenue 


Unemployed 


*Michelson, Edith 


33 Adams Street 


Homemaker 


Mickle, Robert C. 


5 Concord Street 


Autobody Man 


Mortelliti, Nunzio F. 


12 Hathaway Road 


Foreman 


•KMosher, Marjorie G. 


6 Sheldon Avenue 


Switchboard Oper. 


Maise, Allan R. 


19 Birchwood Road 


Component Engineer 


Mullens, George K. 


7k Clark Street 


Salesman 


Mulholland, Francis A. 


225 Shawsheen Avenue 


Foreman 


Mulryan, Michael J, 


I4.6I Salem Street 


Retired 


■K-Neal, Elaine M. 


292 Shawsheen Avenue 


Cr. & Coll. Manager 


Needhsoti, John E. 


523 Shawsheen Avenue 


Supervisor 


Newton, Robert H. 


17 Winter Street 


Laborer 


*Nickerson, Mary M. 


738 Woburn Street 


Bookkeeper 


Nigro, Frank P. Jr. 


26 Oakdale Road 


Data Processing Officer 


*Noel, Dorothy E. 


6 Glenview Road 


Nurses Aide 


*Noonan, Barbara 


18 McDonald Road 


Keypunch Operator 


■K-Norton, Evelyn M. 


201; Wildwood Street 


Housewife 


O'Brien, Hazel M. 


18 Hobson Avenue 


Secretary 


O'Donoghue, Joan M. 


7k Lawrence Street 


Packer 


O'Rourke, Frank T. 


15 Birchwood Road 


Yard Foreman 


■K-Pas snore, Adele Carolyn 


9k Andover Street 


Housewife 


Patrick, Cecil W. 


11^5 Cunningham Street 


Electrician 


Peak, Donald E. 


30 Marcus Road 


Adm. Asst. 


•K-Pellegrini, Annette S, 


J4 Harold Avenue 


Retired 


Peters, George A, 


16 Fairmeadow Road 


Reprod. Artist 


Peterson, Richard H. 


11 Kendall Street 


Repairman 


■«-Poloian, Elinor S. 


21J+ Andover Street 


Real Estate Broker 


Pote, Ira T. 


715 Woburn Street 


Site Supr. 


Quinn, John J. Jr. 


522 Woburn Street 


Life Ins . Field Agent 


•KQuinn, Margaret H. 


22 Frederick Drive 


Ins. Broker 


Reinbolt, Charles 


7 Sprucewood Road 


Truck Driver 


Ring, John S. Jr. 


Cunningham Street 


Systems Programmer 


Ring, Timothy F. 


Cobalt Street 


Cert. Pub. Acct. 


Roberts, Thomas M. 


11 Catherine Avenue 


Controls Engineer 


Rushton, George H. 


38 Shady Lane Drive 


Sr. Scientist 


Russell, Esther L, 


10 Wildwood Street 


Town Clerk 


Sampson, Raymond Jr. 


1 Fairmeadow Road 


Journeyman 


•K-Saunders, Irene E. 


2k Fairmeadow Road 


Accts . Paybl . Clerk 


Sevener, Walter J. 


395 Middlesex Avenue 


Tool & Die Maker 


Sferrazza, Francis 


31 Fairmeadow Road 


Salesman 


Smith, Gilbert 


17 Beech Street 


Eng. Asst. 



58 



Jury List ; (continued) 
NAME 



RESIDENCE 



OCCUPATION 



*Stickney, Elaine R. 


12 Linda Road 


Keypunch Operator 


Storms, Irving H. 


30 Hobson Avenue 


Punch Press Oper. 


*Strouse, Donna J. 


Ik Shady Lane Drive 


Housewife 


Stygles, Daniel J. Sr. 


18 Jones Avenue 


R.R. Signal Maintainor 


Sugnie, Arthtir W. 


39 Marcus Road 


Elec. Tech. 


■Ji-Sullivan, Helen M. 


38 Grove Avenue 


Teacher 


Swan, Willard 


2I46 Middlesex Avenue 


Insp, of Metal Prod. 


Tarara, Robert M, 


$ Lang Street 


Instrumentation Elec. 


Taylor, Raymond L,, Jr. 


189 Woburn Street 


Prod. Supr. 


Visconti, Anthony 


28 Nassau Avenue 


Retired 


■sfWalker, Barbara J . 


1 State Street 


Cashier 


Wfeed, John E. 


2 Cunningham Street 


Retired 


Webber, Elaine D. 


19 Shady Lane Drive 


Secretary 


*Tifebster, Gail E. 
Weimer, Betty L. 


l\$ Hathaway Road 


Teacher Aide 


3h Burlington Avenue 


Self-employed 


Wicks, Theodore R. 


23 Gunderson Road 


Mgr., Accounting Dept. 


*WLlson, Lillian 


$ Marie Drive 


Housewife 


Woller, Eljner H. 


29 Maiji Street 


Bldg. Supr. 


*Woller, Marion J. 


29 Main Street 


Ceramic Instructress 


Zahar, Joseph L, 


1 Birchwood Road 


Salesman 


*ZijTimerman, Shirley M. 


7 Charlotte Road 


Bookkeeper 



Veteran^s Agent 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts Chapter 115> with strict compliance to 
this Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. Benefits are for the needy 
veteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforeseen needs. Pinal approval of benefits 
comes from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, MA. 

Total reimbursement for ^^7h from settled assignments on accident cases authorized by the Commissioner's 
Office was $1,500. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissioner's Office is shared by the Town, 
the Town's share on assignment cases was $750. The total amount of $1,500 has been turned over to the Town 
Treasurer, and the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustment of any monies can be made before State 
reimbursement to the Town. 

The work load of this department increases with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social 
Security and G. I. Education, plus aiding applicants for S.S.I. Unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns, 
and lack of work always has an impact on expenditures, case load varies from time to time, and has increased 
over previous years. This department handles the registration of 18 year olds for the Draft in case of a 
national emergency. In 197U a total of I60 have registered, and we have advised many of these to register 
to vote. 



Balance brought forward from 12/31/73 
Balance 6/30/7U 

Voted at Anmxal Town Meeting 6 months of 197U and 6 months of 1975 
Money encumbered from 6/30/lk 



Total expended for 1971; 



$55,638.85 
19,1+90.93 

$72,000.00 
9,750.00 
$81 ,750.00 

$58,83l|.ii3 



59 



Board of Appeals 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Case #1-7U 

Jay- Dee Builders, Inc. 



Case #2-7U 

John R. Florence 



Case #3-7U 

Walter & Florence Parsons 



Case #k-lk 

Diamond Crystal Salt Co. 



Case #$-74 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



Case #6-7k 

Sarah N. MacDougall 



Case #7-71; 
Polyvinyl Chemical 



Case #8-7U 

Richard Mackney, Jr. 



Case #9-7^; 
Richard J. Dumas 



Case #10- 7U 

Gerald & Carol Mottolo 



Case #11-7U 

I. Fred DiCenso, et al 



For a variance from the Building By-Law, Division J, Section 5 Granted 
(elevation ground water table, etc.) Lot 39 Gearty Street. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a non- conforming dwelling Granted 
on a lot at 37 Beacon Street. 

For a variance from Division 12, Section to install a smoke Granted 
pipe which will project through an external wall at i+ Marion St. 



For a variance to allow an access route over SRA District land Granted 
to Industrial zoned land on Burlington Avenue. 



For a variance to allow a mother-in-law apartment on a lot on Denied 
Franklin Avenue. 



For a variance to maintain a physician's office in a single- Granted 
family dwelling on a lot at 190 Middlesex Avenue and to allow 
for a sign within the required minimum front yard depth. 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 730 Main Street Granted 
within the reqxiired front yard depth. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a non- conforming Granted 
lot at 182 Taft Road and to erect the pool within the 
required reserve side yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing dwelling on Granted 
a non-conforming lot on Roosevelt Road. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing dwelling on Withdra 
a non- conforming lot at 1 Morse Avenue. 

For a variance to operate a business for the processing and Granted 
packaging of frozen food products on a lot at the comer of 
Progress Way and Industrial Way. 



60 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Case #12-7U 

Robert & Anne Rando 



Case #13-7U 
George DiFranco 



Case #1U-7U 

Stanley & Ruth Stedman 



Case #1$-7U 

Paul Mirabella, Applicant 
d/b/a Sonia's Bakery 
Rocco E. Yentile, Owner 

Case #16-7U 
Irving F. Belbin 



Case #17-7U 

George & Loraine Hanna 



Case #18-71; 

John J. Hanafin, Jr. 



Case #1^71^ 
Alan Clement 



Case #20-7U 

Ronald & Margaret Warden 



Case #21-7U 

Alfred & Phyllis Trefry 



Case #22-7U 



John A. Lucci, Trustee 
Lucci Realty Trust and 
Eastgate Restaurant, Inc. 
d/b/a "129 Resta\irant" 
Joseph CoTirtney, Agent 

Case #23-71; 

Barlo Signs for the 

Yum- Yum Shop 

Mr. Kelley, Owner 

tt Case #2U-7U 
Lindon L. Pulley 



For a variance to erect a 5-foot fence pool enclosure on a 
lot at 9 Boutwell Street. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Adelman Road 
within the required front and side yards. 



For a variance to erect an aboveground swimming pool on a non- 
conforming lot at 73 Glen Road and to erect the pool within the 
required rear and side yards. 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 14.17 Main Street. 



For a variance to erect a garage on a non- conforming lot on 
Whitefield Terrace within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a non- conforming lot 
at l\2 Park Street within the reqtiired side yard. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 38 Marcus 
Road within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a non- 
conforming lot on Bay Street. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a non- 
conforming lot at 19 School Street and to erect the addition 
within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at 
197 Burlington Avenue within the required front yai^i. 



For a variance from provisions of Zoning By-Law Section III-5-A-1, 
so as to allow the sale and constmrption of alcoholic beverages 
on said premises at 211 Lowell Street. 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at Wilmington Plaza, 
Main Street. 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land on Boutwell Street into 
two lots; one having insufficient depth and to obtain a building 
permit thereon. 



61 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #2g-7l; 
Mary Bertini 



Case #26-7)4 

P. & R. Auto Supply Corp., 
John H. Graham, Owner 

Case #27-7U 

Benjamin & Ida Coates 



Case #28-71; 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 



Case #29- 7U 
Charles J. Chick 



Case #30- 7U 

John J., James C, & 

Thomas C. I^yons 

John J. Fitzpatrick, Agent 

Case #31-7li 

I. Fred DiCenso and 

Carlo B. DiCenso 

Case #32-71; 
Richard D. Dearing 



Case #33-71; 
William R. Tucci 
William F. Butt & Son, 
Trust, Agent 

Case #3)4-71; 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



Case #35-71; 
Jack Fredericks 



For a variance to correct an error in placing the house too close Granted 
to the front yard at 12 Fairfield Road. 



For a variance to erect a trailer on a lot at I4.7I; Main Street for Granted 
the use of storing auto parts surplus. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a non-conforming lot Granted 
at UO Park Street. 



For a variance to correct an error in the placing of a house too Granted 
close to the front yard at the comer of Draper and Apollo Drive. 



For a variance to erect a garage on a lot at 112 Burlington Ave. 
within the req^lired side yard. 



For a variance to obtain building permits to erect industrial 
buildings on a lot on Wo bum Street, bi-sected by a zoning 
line, having insufficient frontage in the Industrial District. 



For a variance from Section IV-3-A of the Zoning By-Law (extension Granted 
of parking beyond 3OO feet) at 80 Industrial Way. 



For a variance to erect a garage on a non- conforming lot at Granted 
22 Westdale Avenue and to erect the garage within the required 
rear yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a non- Granted 
conforming lot at 35 Belmont Avenue. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Arlene Avenue Granted 
within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect a garage on a non- conforming lot at Granted 
2 Jere Road. 



Case #36-7U 

Thomas & Suzanne Madden 



Case #37-71; 

Blais-Porter, Inc. 

Albert J. Kelly, 

Anna M. Kelly, & 

Ruthe M. Anderson, Owners 

James H. Watts, III, 

Esquire , Agent 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a non-conforming lot Granted 
at 283 Shawsheen Avenue and to erect the pool within the required 
side yard. 

For a variance for the erection of four signs at Lowell Street Denied 
Park. 



62 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Case #38-71; 
Warren G. Newhouse 



Case #39-7U 

John & Viola M. Faulkner 



Case ihO-lh 
Thomas Pazyra and 
Carole Pazyra 

Case #h^-7h 

Paul & Mary E. McDonald 



Case #U2-7U 

John A. Scozzaro, et al 



Case #43-71; 

Vincent & Vivian DeMorris 



Case #14;- 7U 
Charles Guleserian 
John T. Spinelli, Owner 

Case #U5-7U 

Richard & Jacqueline Marsh 



Case #1;6-7U 
Leonard E. Saltzman 
Frederick R. Greenleaf , 
Ovmer 

Case #1;7-7U 

John A. Hersom, Sr. and 
Maureen A. Hersom 

Case #U8-7li 

Paul & Ijillian O'Brien 



Case #U9-7l; 

Michael & Julia Bodnar 



Case #^0-7U 
Orlan J. Poote 



Case #51-71; 

George & Lurlyne Mc Lei Ian 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a non- conforming lot at 
185 Taft Road and to erect the pool within the reqiiired side yard. 



For a variance to erect a garage on a non- conforming lot at 3 Jere 
Road and to erect the garage within the required front yard. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at Ul^^ Middlesex 
Avenue within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a non- conforming lot at 
15 Westdale Avenue and to erect the pool within the required rear 
and side yards. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing dwelling on a 
non-conforming lot at 38 Columbia Street and to erect the addition 
within the required side yard. 



For a variance to alter and enlarge a dwelling on a non- conforming 
lot at 111r Grove Avenue. 



For a variance to install a directory sign on a lot at 2i;0 Andover 
Street and to erect the sign within the required front yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing dwelling on a 
lot at 7 Gowing Road and to erect the addition within the required 
front yard. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot at Swain Road having 
insTif ficient frontage. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing dwelling on a 
non- conforming lot at 9 Woodside Avenue. 



For a variance to divide a lot on Cunningham Street and Lexington 
Street into two non- conforming lots toth having insufficient 
depth and area. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at 
723 Wobum Street within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at 
8 Dadant Drive within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing dwelling on a 
lot at 13 Ferguson Road within the required rear yard. 



63 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decisior 



Case #52- 7U 

Paul & Janis Mangino 



Case #53- 7U 
John F. McGrath 



Case if^k-lk 
Andrea Chase 



For a variance to obtain a special permit for the temporary use 
of a construction trailer to store building materials on a lot 
at i|6 West Street. 



For a variance to erect a single family dwelling on a lot at 
the comer of Shawsheen and Auburn Avenue within the required 
rear yard. 



For a variance to erect a single-family dwelling on a lot at 
King Street having insufficient frontage and area. 



Case #55-71; 

Albert & Catherine Marfleet For a variance to erect a single-family dwelling on a lot at 

30 Boutwell Street having insufficient depth. 



Case #56-71; 

Robert & Beverly Close 



Case #57-7U 

Heirs of Jennie F, Perkins 
Edmund J. Corcoran, 
Applicant 



Case #58- 7U 
Joseph A. Croft 



Case #59-71; 

Robert & Claire Bams 



Case #60-7U 
Walter A. Rooney 



Case #6l-7l| 

Ralph C. Flodin, Owner 
Joseph F. Cou2?tney, Agent 

Case #62-7]^ 
Anthony Paolini 



Case #63-71; 

Robert & Barbara Brown 



Case #6U-7l; 

Charles & Bette L. Ward 



Case #65- 7U 
Beckwith Realty Trust 
c/o Slater & Goldman, 
Attomeys 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 21 Oakdale 
Road within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect a single-family dwelling on a lot on 
Adams Street having insufficient depth. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing garage on 
a lot at 72 Main Street within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 2 Lockwood 
Road within the required side and rear yards. 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land at 399 Chestnut St. 
into two lots, one lot having insufficient frontage on a 
public way and obtain a building permit thereon. 



For a variance to enable applicant to operate business and home 
on same premises at 30 Lowell Street. 



For a variance to allow a building permit for a lot having 
insufficient depth and to biiild a single- family dwelling within 
the front and rear yards of a lot at Agostino Drive. 



For a variance to enlarge a building conducting a non- conforming 
use, located at I27-I3I Main Street. 



For a variance to enlarge a storage shed sittiated within a 
reqioired side yard, on their property at 397 Middlesex Avenue. 



For a variance from Section IV- 3A for a permanent parking lot 
within 300 feet of a b\iilding located on Industrial Way. 



Granted 



Granted 



Withdraw 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



6h 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #66-7l| 

James W. & Jennie Davis 



Case #67-7U 
Lawrence J. Kelly 



Case #68-7k 

Robert Stevens 

C. H. Cummings, Owner 

Case #69-7U 

Thomas Connor, District 
Co-ordinator for 
Foodmakers , Inc . ( Jack- 
in- the-Box Family Rest.) 

Case #70-7U 
Frederick Jackson 
Jackson Bros., Inc., 
Owners 

Case #71-71; 

Stephen & Linda S. Hughes 



Case #72-7U 

Robert & Ellen Waldron 

Case #73-7U 

Richard & Vera Pozzi 



Case #7U-7U 
William J. Ross 



Case m-lh 

Frederick B. & Mary L. 
Hackett 

Case #76-71; 

Jean-Cor Construction 

Corp. 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case #77-7U 

Jean-Cor Construction 

Corp. 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case #78-7U 
Anna M. Connors 



To obtain authorization for the temporary use of a trailer on Granted 
their property at 6 Kelly Road. 



For a variance to erect an addition within a required side yard Granted 
on his property at Concord Street. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on Chestnut Street having Granted 
insufficient frontage and depth. 



For a variance to erect a temporary illuminated sign on a lot Denied 
at 279 Main Street. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on Lot ^2, Ella Avenue Granted 
having insufficient frontage. 



For a variance to erect an addition (porch) to the existing Granted 
dwelling within the required reserved side yard area at 
6 Cleveland A. venue. 



For a variance to allow for an in-law apartment at 5 Stone Street. Granted 

For a variance to erect a swi m m i ng pool on a lot at 27 Allen Park Granted 
Drive within the required reserved side yard. 

For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 5 Wedgewood Granted 
Avenue within the required reserved side yard. 



For a variance to erect a single-family dwelling on a lot having Denied 
insufficient depth and area at 289 Shawsheen Avenue. 

For a variance from the provisions of Section V-5 of the Zoning Granted 
By-Laws so as to authorize a biiilding permit for a single- 
family dwelling on a lot with less than the required minimum 
depth on Aldrich Road. 

For a variance for a building permit for a single-family house Granted 
on a lot with less than the required depth and less than the 
required front yard. Lot located at Aldrich Road and 
HoiJghton Road. 



For a variance to allow for an in-law apartment within a single- Denied 
family dwelling at 9 Shady Lane Drive. 



65 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #79-714 
Arnold B. Jackson 



Case #80-7U 

Sweetheart Plastics, Inc. 



Case #81 -7U 
Ralph E. Newhouse 



Case #82-71; 
Vincent Porciello 



For a variance to erect an addition within the required side Granted 
yard at 3 Marcia Road. 

For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) Granted 
maximum height limitations to erect four storage silos, at 
Lot 13> Assessor's Map 31 • 



For a variance to sub-divide a lot on Roosevelt Road into two Denied 
non-conforming lots, both having insufficient depth and area, 
and to obtain a building permit thereon. 



To obtain a Special Permit for the temporary use of a construe- Granted 
tion trailer on a lot on Ballardvale Street. 



Case #83-71; 

Peter F. Pellegrini 



Case #8h-lh 

A. Melville & Lillian M. 
Woodside, d/b/a 
Wilmington Regional 
Health Center 

Case #85-71; 

Ralph & Angelina Pepe 



Case #86-71; 
Brewster Ames, Jr. 



Case #87-7U 

Daniel & Lorraine Ballou 



Case #88-7U 

John C. & Elga Elia 



Case #89-7U 

Robert & Virginia R. 

Doucette 

Case #90-71; 
Beckwith Realty Trust 
c/o Slater & Goldman, 
Attorneys 

Case #91-71; 

Melrose Savings Bank 



To obtain a five-foot variance to erect a structure within a Granted 
required reserve side yard at k Harold Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from the Board of Appeals as required Granted 
under Section III, B.2 to allow as a permitted use an 
ambulatory care center and related services at Lowell Street, 
Assessor's Map 57 » Lot 1|6. 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition to the existing Granted 
dwelling within the required reserve side yard area at 
11 Marcia Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 for two lots, each Granted 
having insufficient depth according to said section. Property 
located on Carter Lane, Assessor's Map 32, Parcels 81; & 85. 



To obtain a variance to erect a single- family dwelling within a Granted 
flood plain district in accordance with Section III 6A.1 
Lot located on Park Street, Assessor's Map 93 > Parcel 11;C. 



To obtain a variance to enlarge a non- conforming structure at Granted 
379 Middlesex Avenue within a required side yard. 



To acquire a variauice to erect a garage within a required reserve Granted 
side yard at 6 Allen Park Drive. 



To acquire a variance from Section IV-3.A.8 for parking facilities Withdraw 
located on Industrial Way. 



For a variance to erect a sign on the premises at 219 Lowell St. Granted 



66 



I 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Case #92-71; 

Stepan Chemical Conrpany 
Polychem Department 

Case m-lh 

Norman & Mariette Thibault 



Case #9U-7U 
Paul A. Bartlett 
Murray-Kelly Corp. 
d/b/a "The Farmer & 
The Del, Inc." 

Case #95-7U 

John & Barbara Gifford 



Case #96-7U 
Glen Pines, Inc. 



Case #97-71; 
Vincent Porciello 



Case #98-71; 

Sweetheart Plastics, Inc. 



Case #99- 7U 

Sweetheart Plastics, Inc. 



Case #100-71; 
Beckwith Realty Trust 
c/o Slater & Goldman, 
Attorneys 

Case #101-71; 

Angus & Norma MacDonald 



Case #102-71; 
[Valley Properties, 
Leo V. Jezierski, 
Applicant 

Case #103-71; 



Inc. 



Americo Ebios 



Case #101^-71; 



Mary A. & Leo 
Deshamais 



To acquire a variance from Section VII-2 which regulates dumping 
and filling of land in any district. 51 Eames Street. 



To obtain a variance to erect a swimming pool within a required 
reserve side yard at 7 Gearty Street. 



To acqxiire a variance to erect an additional sign, area in 
excess of Shopping Plaza master plan at 2^-35 Lowell Street 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition to the existing 
dwelling within a required side yard at 2 Tanner Road. 



To obtain a variance to construct a single- family dwelling on 
a lot on Agostino Drive (7A) having insufficient frontage 
and depth. 



To acquire a variance to construct a biailding within the reqiiired 
front yard, property located at Ballardvale Street and Route 125 
as shown on Assessor's Map R2, Part of 20A. 



To obtain a variance to permit excavation work for purposes of 
constructing a water holding pond as required by Wil mi ngton 
Conservation Commission tmder the Wetlands Act. Property 
located at One Burlington Avenue. 



To obtain a variance for the construction of a building and dam 
within a Flood Plain District located at One Burlington Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from Section IV- 3. A. 8 for parking 
facilities at Industrial Way. 



To acquire a variance to construct an addition to the existing 
garage within a required reserve side yard at t).0 Swain Road. 



To obtain a variance to install and erect a sign on a store for 
Radio Shack at 2l;0 Main Street. 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing dwelling 
within a reqtiired reserve side yard at 25 Dadant Drive. 



For a variance to erect an addition and swimming pool to the 
existing dwelling within the req\iired reserve side yard at 
25 Moore Street. 



67 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #10$- 7U 
George B. Arsenault 



Case #106-71; 
Joseph A. LaCreta 



Case #107-74 
Elsusapa Realty Trust 
Anthony Paolini, Tr. 

Case #108-7U 
John T. Spinelli 



To acqiiire a variance to erect a single- family dwelling within Pending 
the required reserve front yard on said property at Auhum Ave. 

To acquire a special permit to move existing business (Sandwich Pending 
Shop) from I4.20 Main Street to Railroad Station across the street 
at 14.33 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a single-family dwelling on a 
lot nmbered 27, Clorinda Road. 



To acquire a variance to erect a Directory Sign within a required Pending 
reserve front yard, at 240 Andover Street. 



Solid Waste Disposal 



Through 1974, the Solid Waste Disposal Committee has worked to provide the Town with a solution to its solid 
waste disposal problem. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health issued an Order to the Town on 
June 11, 1974, req\iiring complete compliance with the Sanitary Landfill Regulations and their previous two 
citations. On September 16, 1974, another citation was received giving the Town until October to submit a 
final plan for abating all violations of the State regulations at the present dump. This deadline has been 
unofficially extended due to the work of the committee toward developing an acceptable waste disposal 
operation. 

Early in 1974 the committee interviewed nine engineering consulting firms and settled on Metcalf & Eddy, Inc 
to perform the necessary survey to determine the proper methods for disposal of the Town's solid wastes. 
Operating within the general scope of work specified by the conmiittee, Metcalf & Eddy investigated various 
alternatives such as incineration, out-of-town disposal, door-to-door collection and in-town disposal methoc 
Also investigated were the s\xitability of various locations in the Town for a landfill, the operational 
requirements of a properly run landfill and all economic considerations. 

On November 22, 1974, Metcalf & Eddy submitted its final recommended solid waste management plan to the Tcwi 
The report basically recommends that a new sanitary landfill should be developed and operated on the Town- 
owned land on the Wilmington- Wo bum line, west of Route 38 aJ^d. adjacent to the existing d\imp. In addition 
the report recommends that the site be run by a qualified private contractor chosen by public bidding and 
under strict control of the Town, and that the operation be in complete conformance with all applicable 
landfill regulations. Other operational and environmental safeguard provisions are also included. 

The Committee has and will continue to talk with engineering consultants, trash collectors, dump operators, 
state officials and private citizens to gain further insist into the best technical and economic as well ai 
socially acceptable method of handling the Town's solid waste. It is the committee's intent to develop a 
waste disposal plan that will best serve the Town at a minimum social, environmental and economic cost. 



68 



Council on Aging 



In its Second Annual Report to the Citizens of Wilmington, the Coiancil would like to announce that it has had 
la very active and successful year. The council is comprised of eleven non-salaried board members, appointed 
|by the Board of Selectmen, and a coordinator, recommended by the council. Six of the eleven members are 
isenior citizens which provides an excellent source for communicating the needs and desires of the town's 
elderly population. 

Any senior, age sixty or over, upon request, may receive a senior citizen identification card. These cards 
are issued at the Senior Drop-in-Center located at the Wil mi ngton Plaza. At present 362 cards have been 
issued from the center. The Drop-in-Center is open Monday thro\;i^h Friday from ten in the morning until four 
in the afternoon. Game days are held on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays. Wednesdays are arts and crafts and 
bowling. Tuesdays are health counselling days (this service is provided by the Board of Health). Whist 
parties are held once a month and dancing lessons once a month. The attendance at the Drop-in-Center has 
been approximately 35500 in total from September 197U to December ^^'Jk• These are seniors who are taking 
advantage of the programs offered, and those who just drop in to say hello, or to seek information. 

Some of the highlights of the year's activities were a Halloween Party with costumes in October, a Thanks- 
giving Dinner at the K. of C. with entertainment provided by the Andover Townsmen, a Barbershop Group, and 
the Sweet Adelines. A Christmas Party was held with the exchange of gifts by the seniors. A Christmas 
Dinner was given by Sweetheart Plastics, Inc., for the seniors, and organ music by Mr. Bahia was the 
entertainment. Two bus rides were taken this past year. One to Spag's Shopping Center, in Worcester with 
Itmch at the Red Coach Grill in Framingham. The other trip was to Peabody Shopping Center for Christmas 
shopping with lunch at the Hilltop Restaurant in Saugus. 

6. mini bus was provided by the school system for the months of July and August. This service was used by 
58 people to go to the doctors, dentist, hospitals, activities and shopping. From September to December a 
car was donated by Wilmington Ford, and was made available to senior citizens. Sixty-eight people availed 
themselves of this service. 

Sincere gratitude to the merchants of Wilmington who allow discounts and to other merchants who have been 
^lelpful and cooperative to seniors. On behalf of the senior citizens the council would like to express its 
appreciation to the following: Mr. M. Demoulas, who has provided the quarters and utilities which is now 
the Senior Drop-in-Center. We wish to thank Rotary, Kiwanis, Tewksbuiy- Wilmington Elks, and the Knights of 
Ilolumbus who provided services to the senior citizens. Many thanks to the Crusaders of Wilmington for 
providing transportation, food, and entertainment for a day at Wayland Park, and to Wilmington Ford for 
ionating the car. 

Phere has been excellent participation by the seniors in all programs and activities. It is hoped that more 
senior citizens will become active, take advantage of the programs offered, and become more involved in 
lelping to change the image of the senior citizen from one of an inactive person to one of a creative, 
Lma^inative, participating member of the community. 

Picasso's life enhancing humane observation was, "It takes a long time to become young." 



69 



Accepted Streets 



street 


From 




Church Street 


AHams StTPPt 


Middlesex Avenue 


A~l Ht*"i pVi RdpH 


SViAwsVippTi Avpmip 


Al 1 pn Pa.T'W Dt*"i vp 


Fairmont Avenue 


Aiid.0 ve r S ti* ee t 


Salem Street 


AnHnTTiPT* ,*~5t".T*pp'h 

Aj.iV.LL' VC± iJOXCCU 


End nf T Q'lB 




5^1". a "h p T . 3 vm 1 "K 


Anthony Avenue 


Salem Street 


Ann! 1 n DT*i vp 


Draper Road 


Arlene Avenue 


Salem Street 


Auburn Avenue 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Ayotte Street 


West dale Avenue 


Baker Street 


Brand Avenue 


Baland Road 


Ballardvale Street 


Ballardvale Street 


Salem Street 


Bancroft Street 


Liberty Street 


Beacon Street 


nVn]T*rh StTPPt 


T^pch Strppt 


RiitI "i "nptrm Avpttiip 


Beeching Avenue 


CuTuiingham Street 


BeXiTiont Avenue 


Columbia Street 


Benson Road 


Radcliff Road 


Ri_T*plTijnnd T?n;5f] 


Short Street 


Bxpchwood Road. 




Bixchwood. Ros-d. 


S}i a dv T p Dt* i vp 

k^xxa.\.aLy j_iu«Li>>i^ V v-iT 


Rrmtupl 1 iS'h'ppp'h 

U\J U W C t>fX CO u 


A1 Hr»"if^Vi \{c\^c\ 


RmitupT n tS'hT*pp'h 


WoT*'hlnPT*l V TiynH nf* 

IvUX OJ.1CX -^J' J-iilVX wx 




i960 Town Layout 


Brand Avenue 


Bridge Lane 


Brattle Street 


Massachusetts Avenue 


Brentwood Avenue 


Woodside Avenue 


Bridge Lane 


Main Street 


Broad Street 


Carmel Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Main Street 


Burnap Street 


Winchell Street 


Bumap Street 


Grove Avenue 


Burt Road 


Cedar Street 


Butters Row 


Main Street 


Buzzell Drive 


Evans Road 


Canal Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Canal Street 


Corey Avenue 


Carolyn Road 


North Street 


Carolyn Road 


Linda Road 


Carson Avenue 


Hathaway Road 


Carson Avenue 


Marie Drive 


Carter Lane 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Catherine Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 


Cedar Street 


Harris Street 


Cedar Crest Road 


Pinewood Road 



To Feet Date (s) Acceptec 



Chandler Road 


I20I1.29 


3-15-69 




Parker Street 


2915+ 


3-02-08 




Billerica Line 


67UO + 


11-06-91; 




Fairmont Avenue 


2318.61; 


3-27-71 




Andover Line 


II8U0+ 


II-O6-9I; 




Northerly 


1368.59 


3-21-70 




Catherine Avenue 


800 


10-03-66 




Charlotte Road 


300 


3-27-71 




Dorothy Avenue 


789.22 


10-03-66 




Dead End 


80U.50 


3-12-l;5 




Crest Avenue 


2)40 


3-10-l;7 




Dead End 


68U.I1O 


3-12-l;5 




Route 93 




3-18-72 




Andover Line 


97Il5+ 


II-O6-9I; 




Dead End 


iiOO 


3-17-152 




Belmont Avenue 


970 + 


3 -01 -15 




Byron Street 


100$ 


3-10-1; 7 




Faulkner Avenue 




3_lli_59 




State Street 


980 


3-03-33 




Tewksbury Town Line 


615.67 


3-27-71 

_^ *- I 1-1- 




Shady Lane Drive 


596.97 


3-10-58 




i;00 ' South 


ij.00 


3-10-53 




600 ' North 


600 


3-17-52 




Biju^lington Avenue 


1320.05 


II-06-9I; 


3-1 2 -6( 


Aldrich Road 


282U.36 


3-27-71 




Baker Street 


1620+ 


3-13-33 


3-08-1;. 


Garden Avenue 


1066.80 


3-12-l;5 




Woburn Street 


1017+ 


6-21-38 




Shawsheen Avenue 


1277+ 


II-O6-9I; 




Both Ways 


1376.92 


3-13-51; 




Biirlington Line 


8588+ 


II-06-9I; 




Easterly 


lll4i;.8o 


3-12-l;5 




Pond Street 


U8i; 


3-10-53 




62' past Water Street 


1653+ 


3-12-l;5 


3-ll-l;( 


Chestnut Street 


3577+ 


11-06-91; 




Draper Road 


600 


3-27-71 




Corey Avenue 


814;. 75 


10-16-39 




Burt Road 


660 .i;5 


3-12-55 




Marcia Road 


1268 


3-12-60 


3-27-7: 


Marcia Road 


290.13 


3-27-71 




Both Ways 


677 


3-10-53 


3-12-5.' 


South 


299.72 


3-11-61 




Dead End 


li4ll 


3^9-57 




Dorothy Avenue 


1881 .80 


10-03-66 




Burt Road 


687+ 


3-12-l;5 




Judith Road 


1100 


5-27-63 





70 



Accepted Streets (continued) 



Street 


From 


J.O 


r eeii 


jjaue \^ ) 


Central Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


unurcn ooxccU' 




inn A_iXn 
lu— 10— pu 


onandier Koaa. 


ivex±ey noaa 


iiQcUUo uOr^cO 


lino 


p-uy-p I 


Chapman Avenue 


Hathaway Road 


Sheridan Road 




p-up-pi 


L^narxooiie uoaa 


Gunderson Road 


Apono lirive +/ou 


o?y 


J-<- (-( J- 


Chase Road 


Hathaway Road 


ijeao ijnQ 


907 


P--1-U-PP 


unesTjiiuTi Qoreeo 


Burlington Avenue 


wo DUE n j-u_ric 


1 1 liRr>+ 

XlZJ-OU^ 


1 1 _nA oil 
xi"Uu— yi| 


Church btreet 


Main Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


i4.ilOp + 


±x— (JO— yz4. 


Clark fatreet 


Middlesex Avenue 


Church Street 




11-uo— yij. 


Clark Street 


Main Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


1886. ii3 


ll-06-9li 


Cochrane Road 


Forest Street 


Warren Road 


800 


3-10-l;7 


Columbia ,'Street 


Church Street 


ueact iina. 






Concord Street 


Federal Street 


No • Reading Line 




il-Oo-yy. 


Congress Street 


Forest Street 


Burlington Line 


7( ( + 


xu-io-jy 


Cook Aveme 


Main Street 


Dead End 


oLd ,50 


3-11-Uo 


Coolidge Road 


Hathaway Road 


Dead End 


270 


3-05-51 


Corey Avenue 


Grand Street 


Canal Street 


365.01; 


3-05-51 


Cottage Street 


Main Street 


Dead End 


927.18 


3-13-51; 


Crest Avenue 


Ayotte Street 


Dead End 


558 


3-10-li7 


Cross Street 


Main Street 


Lowell Street 


697+ 


II-06-9I4 


Cunningham Street 


Salem Street 


Lexington Street 


972.33 


3-13-Ui 


Cunningham Street 


Beeching Avenue 


Jacobs Street 


955 


3-10-53 


Cunningham Street 


Jacobs Street 


500 ' North 


520 


3-17-52 


Cypress Street 


Glen Road 


Dead End 


260 


3-05-51 


Dadant Drive 


North Street 


North Street 


1760.08 


3-IU-6I; 


Davis Street 


Main Street 


Dead End 


500 


3-17-52 


Dayton Road 


Hathaway Road 


Dead hnd 


170 


3-05 -51 


Dell Drive 


Burlington Avenue 


Deao. rjiu 




■3_r\R c^ft 
pHJO-pO 


Dell Drive 


xypo iown Layout 


Dell Drive 




1 A 7n 


Dobson Street 


uien rtoad. 


Gary Street 




P-J-P-P4 


Dorchester Street 


Billerica Line 




1 on 1 1-1- 
lcxij.+ 


p-Up-pX 


Dorothy Avenue 


Barbara Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 


1U90.U5 


3-12-60 


Draper Drive 


Gunderson Road 


Dead End 


100 


3-lli-59 


Draper Drive 


jiasLern rJia. oi lypy 


Evans Drive 


J.UOU+ 






Town Layout near 










Gunderson Road 








Drury Lane 


bchool otreet 


uLen Road 


/loo 1,0 


3-09-03 


Dublin Avenue 


Main Street 


Dead End 


500 


3-05-51 


Dunton Road 


Nassau Avenue 


Both Ways 


040, 50 


3-10-56 


Eamies Street 


Main Street 


Woburn Street 


2350 + 


11-06-94 


Edwards Road 


Forest Street 


Baldwin Road 


h50 


3-10-l;7 


Elwood Road 


Forest Street 


Dead End 




3-09-68 


Emerson Street 


Oakwood Road 


Fa\LLkner Avenue 


^01 .01 


3-05-51 


Englewood Drive 


Kenwood Drive 


Dead End 


li55.ili 


3-27-71 


Evans Drive 


Gunderson Road 


Draper Drive 


2071.35 


3-27-71 


Fairfield Avenue 


Main Street 


Dead End 


1298.92 


3-11-U6 


Fsdrmeadow Road 


Nichols Street 


Nichols Street 


2327. 5ii 


3-08-58 


Fairmont Avenue 


Malloy Road 


Dead End 


952+ 


3-21-71 


Fairview Avenue 


State Street 


Dead End 


6i|8.io 


3-13-33 


Faneuil Drive 


Massachusetts Avenue 


Dead End 


790 


10-16-50 


Faulkner Avenue 


Glen Road 


Cedar Avenue 


666.35 


3-13-101 


Faulkner Avenue 


Cedar Avenue 


Jacobs Street 


19ii6.08 


3-10-53 


Fay Street 


Glen Road 


Garden Avenue 


258.93 


6-21-38 


Fay Street 


Garden Avenue 


South 


1;55.15 


3-12-li5 


Federal Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Wobum Street 


57UO+ 


II-06-9I; 


Ferguson Road 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Dead Ehd 


1072 .61 


3-11-67 



71 



Accepted Streets (continued) 



Street 



From 



To 



Feet Date (s) Accepted 



Floradale Avenue 
Fordham Road 
Forest Street 
Frederick Drive 

Glen Road 
GLendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gowing Road 
Grace Drive 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Gunderson Road 
Gunderson Road 

Hamlin Lane 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hathaway Road 



Havrthorne Road 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 

Industrial Way 

Jaquith Road 
Jere Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 



Burlington Avenue 
North Reading Town Line 
Aldrich Road 
Salem Street 

Main Street 
Glen Road 
Simcrest Avenue 
Park Street 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Dunmore Road 
Federal Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Marie Drive 

Lawrence Street 
Aldrich Road 
Aldrich Road 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
■Vfoburn Street 
Eastern End of 19$9 
Town Layout Near 
Gunderson Road 
Wobiirn Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Chestnut Street 
Suncrest Avenue 
Pijie Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 

Vlbburn Street 

Shawsheen Avenue 
Fairmeadow Road 
Glen Road 
Cedar Crest Road 



Dead End 


627. i;7 


3-21-70 


Dead End 


371I4.O8 


3-27-71 


Burlington Avenue 


laoo 


II-06-9U 


Dead End 


1070 


10-03-66 


Middlesex Avenue 


6870 


II-06-9U 


GLen Road 


1303.70 


3-17-52 


Dead End 


365.21 


3-1U-59 


Marcus Road 


9I4I.I8 


3-10-56 


Dead End 


2$lh 


10-03-66 


Dead End 


815+ 


3-17-52 


B & M RR 


780 


3-08-l;3 


Lake Street 


iaU7+ 


9-29-10 


Both Ways 


1081 


3-1U-59 


South 


i;2U.89 


10-03-66 


Dead End 




3-10-62 


Jaquith Road 


i^27.82 


3^5-51 


Jaquith Road 


600+ 


3-0U-95 


Reed Street 


1311 .50 


3-27-71 


Cedar Street 


806.3$ 


3-12-U5 


River Street 


h30 


3^5-51 


Gunderson Road 


1858 


3-51 


Evans Drive 


lla2.36 


3-27-71 



Dead End 230 

Woburn Street 3585+ 

Burlington Line 2230+ 

Dead End 36U.3U 
150 ' Beyond Wiser Street 1520 

Billerica Line 305l+ 

West Street hh30 

Dead End 1250 

Fairmeadow Road 12l;7.82 

Dead End 716.90 

Birchwood Road UOO 



3-53 3- 



3-10-56 
11-06-91; 
3-02-11; 
3-1U-59 

3-l;5 3-51 3- 
II-06-9I; 3-18-72 

3-11-71; 

3-8-38 3-h9 3- 
3-09-68 
6-10 -1;0 
3-10-53 



Kelley Road 


Chandler Road 


Both Ways 


923+ 


3-^9-57 


Kendall Street 


Aldrich Road 


Blanchard Road 


ll;20+ 


3-12 -1;5 


Kenwood Avenue 


Wbburn Street 


Redwood Terrace 


532.51; 


3-21-70 


Kenwood Avenue 


Southerly End of 1970 


Redwood Terrace 


65S^.1;9 


3-27-71 




Town Layout, Near 










Redwood Terrace 








Kiernan Avenue 


Main Street 


Dead End 


693. 1;3 


3^8-58 


Kilmarnock Street 


West Street 


Route 93 


181;0+ 


II-06-9I; 


King Street 


Glen Road 


Broad Street 


2l;00 


6-10 -1;0 


Kirk Street 


Main Street 


Dead End 


575 


3^5-51 


Lake Street 


Main Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


3855+ - 


II-O6-9I; 


Lang Street 


Bancroft Street 


B & M RR 


1;08.50 


3-17-52 


Laurel Avenue 


Molloy Road 


Parker Street 


658.70 


10-16-50 


Lawrence Court 


Lawrence Street 


Dead End 


727.83 


3-10-56 


Lawrence Street 


Glendale Circle 


Shady Lane Drive 


3772.92 


3-10-56 


Ledgewood Road 


Simcrest Avenue 


Dead End 


383. 1;0 


3-1U-59 


Lexington Street 


Cunningham Street 


Morningside Drive 


nh 


3-11-71; 


Liberty Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR 


7hO 


3-08-l;3 



72 



Accepted Streets (continued) 



Street 



From 



To 



Feet 



Date (s) Accept 



Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 

Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Loumac Road 
Lowell Street 
Lowell Street Park 



Federal Street 
High Street 

200' past Pineridge Rd. 
Main Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Drury Lane 
Main Street 
Lowell Street 



B & M RR 
200' past 
Pineridge Rd. 
Dead End 
Dead End 
Dead End 
Dead End 
Dead End 
Reading Line 
Dead End 



720 
1599.16 

160 .50 

io5o 

977. U9 

650 
510+ 
10152.27 
580+ 



3-08-i;3 

10- 16-50 

3-lii-6ii 
3-05-51 
3^9-57 
3-1U-59 
3^9-63 

11- 06-9U 
1908 - 1957 





TTpHp-pQl .S'h.T'PP'h 


Dead End 


250 


j-^u— 4J 




Tewksbury Line 


Woburn Line 


21386.81 


II-O6-9I4. 




Mnrth St.rppt. 


Dead End 


1109 .i;5 


■^-1 n-6? 




1 Q6? Tnun T.avmit. 


Dead End 


1696.85 




Marcus Road 


Gowing Road 


Gowing Road 


2315.13 


3^8-58 


Marie Drive 


Wobiirn Street 


Thrush Road 


1281i+ 


3-11-61 


MaT*"! T)T*"1 '\TI^ 
l lcLL J-O J_/± J_ V C 




Gunderson Road 


223.65 


1 D-D ^-66 




RnT»~l ~[ 'ncr"Kr\Ti Airf^rmp 


Dead End 


1766.10 










900 


^ J- — i+> 




Mq"! n .Sti^ppt". 

11"- III [ \~/ CO KJ 


Dead End 


li;68.73 






Mai n StTPPt 


St. Paul Street 


810 .19 




McDonald Road 


Salem Street 


Dead End 


2621.27 


3-13-iai 


Meadow Lane 


Suncrest Avenue 


Dead End 


363.61 


3-09-57 


Melody Lane 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Grace Drive 


2U5.U6 


10-03-66 


Middlesex Avenue 


Main Street 


Salem Street 


121U0+ 


II-06-9I1 


Miles Street 


Main Street 


Hobs on Avenue 


380 


3-12-U5 


Miller Road 


Glen Road 


Emerson Street 


637.88 


3-12-U5 


Moore Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Wedgewood Avenue 


1528 .i|2 


3-11-67 


Morningside Drive 


Lexington Street 


Fairfield Road 


693 


3'-ll-7U 


Morse Avenue 


Wob-urn Street 


Dead End 


1359.65 


10-16-39 


l^stic Avenue 


Middlesex Avenue 


Dead End 


598 


3-02-08 


Nassau Avenue 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Dimton Road 


1969.76 


3-ll-li6 


Nathan Road 


Senpek Road 


Northerly Dead End and 1056.72 


3-27-71 






Southerly Dead End 






Nichols Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Shawsheen River 


3801+ 


ll-06-9li 


Nickerson Avenue 


West Street 


Dead End 


953.50 


3-10-U7 


Norfolk Street 


Carter Lane 


Nassau Averaie 


537 


3-13-5U 


North Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


367' past 


1292.33 


3-12 -U5 






Pineridge Rd. 






North Street 


367' past Pineridge Rd. 


Dadant Drive 


2i;6i;+ 


3-13-5U 


Nunn Road 


Kelley Road 


Dead End 


213.81 


3-13-65 


Oak Street 


Salem Street 


Dead End 


355+ 


3-19-51 


Oakdale Road 


Judith Road 


Short Street 


2301+ 


10-16-50 


Oakridge Circle 


Cowing Road 


Gowing Road 


1730 .09 


3^8-58 


Oakwood Road 


Main Street 


Reading Avenue 


800 


3-11 -1|6 


Olson Street 


Church Street 


Dead End 


122 


3^9-57 



Park Street 


Woburn Street 


No. Reading Line 


I1I80+ 


II-06-9U 


Parker Street 


Lowell Street 


Blackstone Street 


2000+ 


3^U^7 


Patricia Circle 


Dell Drive 


Dell Drive 




3^8-58 


Pershing Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR 


720 


3-08-U3 


Phillips Avenue 


Wild Street 


Baker Street 


1136.63 


3-11 -1;6 


Phillips Avenue 


Baker Street 


300' past Baker Street 


300 


3-13-5U 


Pilling Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 


95U 


■ 3-1U-59 


Pine Avenue 


Main Street 


Hobson Avenue 


380 


3-12-U5 


Pineridge Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 


913.82 


3-12-60 



73 



Accepted Streets (continued) 





From 


To 


Feet 


natp (s^ 












rJLlicWUULl X1*UCIU, 




kJiicLLLV ijCLiiC Ui. -LVC 






Pleasant Road 


Middlesex Avenue 


Linda Road 




3-10-62 


Powder House Circle 


Middlesex Avenue 


Dead End 


710+ 


3-13-51; 


Progress Way 


Industrial Way 


630 ' South of 


630 


3-11-71; 






Industrial Way 






Radcliff Road 


South Street 


Benson Road 


355 


3-27-71 


Railroad Avenue 


Clark Street 


Dead End 


650+ 


3-01-09 


Redwood Terrace 


Kenwood Avenue 


Dead End 


61;5 


3-21-70 


Reed Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Dead End 


1089.67 


3-27-71 


Ridge Road 


Suncrest Avenue 


Dead End 


365.21 


3-10-56 


River Street 


Massachusetts Avenue 


Harvard Avenue 


I453+ 


3-10-62 


Roberts Road 


Burlington Avenue 


Burlington Avenue 


i860 .6h 


3-11-67 


Rollins Road 


Fenway Street 


Marion Street 


200 


3-1 3-51; 


Roosevelt Road 


Boutwell Street 


Swain Road 


1979.71 


3-11-U6 


Royal Street 


Salem Street 


Dead End 


IOU3.27 


3^5-51 



Salem Street 


Tewksbury Line 


No. Reading Line 


13730+ 


II-O6-9I; 


Scaltrito Drive 


Salem Street 


785' South of Salem Street 785 


3-11-71; 


School Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Dead End 


617.37 


3^1-15 


School Street 


End of 1915 Town Layout 


Dead End 


522.02 


3^9-63 


Sewell Road 


Hathaway Road 


Dead End 


380 


3-12-55 


Shady Lane Drive 


Middlesex Avenue 


Sprucewood Road 


2128.12 


10-16-50 


Shady Lane Drive 


Sprucewood Road 


Lawrence Street 


775.50 


3^8-58 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Main Street 


Billerica Line 


118U5+ 


II-06-9I; 


Sheridan Road 


Hathaway Road 


Dead End 


1;87 


3^5-51 


Sheridan Road 


Woburn Street 


Hathaway Road. 


2021+ 


3-27-71 


Sherwood Road 


Cochrane Road 


Forest Street 


14;5 


3-27-71 


Silver Lake Avenue 


Lake Street 


Dexter Street 


1;55.20 


3-13-5I; 


Sprucewood Road 


Shady Lane Drive 


Short Street 


690.25 


3-17-52 


State Street 


Belmont Avenue 


Fairview Avenue 


315 


3^3-33 


Strout Avenue 


Lowell Street 


Dead End 


907.90 


3-17-55 


Suncrest Avenue 


West Street 


Ledgewood Avenue 


121^6+ 


3-13-5I; 


Swain Road 


Burlington Avenue 


Taft Road 


850+ 


3-20-22 


Swain Road 


Taft Road 


Forest Street 


1012.02 


10-16-29 



Taft Road 
Taplin Avenue 
Temple Street 
Thrush Road 
Thurston Avenue 
Truman Road 

Upton Court 

Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Avenue 
Webber Street 
Wfedgewood Avenue 
West Street 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wicks Circle 
lifi-ghtman Road 



Swain Road 
Baker Street 
Chiorch Street 
Salem Street 
Chxirch Street 
Hathaway Road 

Andover Street 

Main Street 

No . Reading Line 

Main Street 
Lake St . , Tewksbury 
Clark Street 
B\irlington Avenue 
Moore Street 
Reading Line 
Lowell Street 
West Street 
Everett Avenue 
Warren Road 



Boutwell Street 
Both Ways 
Dead End 
Marie Drive 
Dead End 
Dead End 

Dead End 

Lubbers Brook 
Dead End 

Dead End 
Wightman Road 
Stone Street 
Dead End 
Dead End 
Lowell Street 
Woburn Street 
B & M RR 
Dead End 
Albert Street 



1985.53 


6-21-38 


860 .51; 


3-ll-l;6 


211; 


6-06-11 


Uoo 


3-11-61 


li6o+ 




300 


3-10-53 


3l;5+ 


II-06-9I; 


1076 


3-06-16 


1105+ 


3-13-51; 


i;22.70 


3^8-58 


97.19 




2010+ 


3-01-20 


676.08 




1;75.65 


3-11-67 


360I4.39 


II-O6-9I; 


5030+ 




1211 


6-22-l;2 


533 .1;8 


3-27-71 


238.50 


3-13-51; 



71; 



Accepted Streets (continued) 



Sbreet 


From 


To 


Feet 


Date (s) Accepted 


Wild Avenue 


CiTove Avenue 


B & M RR 


io5o+ 


12-29-10 


Wildwood Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Wobiorn Street 


5920+ - 


11-06-91; 


Williams Avenue 


Main Street 


Dead End 


, 706.02 


6-10 -1;0 


Wilson Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR 


760 


3-08-l;3 


Wilton Drive 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Dead End 


1151.23 


10-03-66 


Wlnchell Road 


Grove Avenue 


Bumap Street 


192.95 


3-12-i;5 


Iflfijig Road 


Woburn Street 


Dead End 


7U6.07 


3-08-58 


Wiser Street 


Main Street 


Dead End 


620 


10-16-50 


Woburn Street 


Andover Street 


Woburn Lijie 


203i;0+ 


II-06-9I; 


Woodland Road 


Lowell Street 


Dead End 


1173.81; 




Woodlawn Avenue 


Border Avenue 


Kensington Avenue 


250 


3-17-52 




Santa's Workshop conducted by the Recreation Depart- 
ment and many volunteers. 




Wilmington Police Association sponsoring the Annual Recreation Beach 
Day and Swim Meet. 



75 





THE BALDWIN APPLE MONU- 
MENT; has a new legend, enscribed in 
the past year by the Rumford Historical 
Association. 



THE HISTORIC HARNDEN TAVERN IS NOW THE PROPERTY OF THE TOM. 
Built about 1 775, it was operated by Col. Joshua Harnden as a tavern in the period 1 79i D 
before the War of 1812. 

The home was acquired by Dr. Silas Brown about 1818, and was the home of te 





THE HATHORN HOUSE: On Woburn Street. C. 1743. 
Reputedly the Hathorn family was the only one in Wilmington 
to be faithful to the Crown of England - although the story is 
not definitely proven. 



THE HILLER MANSION. Built after 1876, the home of the 
Doctors Hiller, - Henry and Grance, and a show place of 
Wilmington for many years. 

It is now a business office, near Wilmington Square. 





rations of his descendants. In the days prior to the Civil War it was reputed to be a 
•over place for run-away slaves - a 'Station' of the 'Underground Railroad'. 
This cannot be definitely proven, but was quite probably true. Dr. Brown and his family 
] members of a religious sect which was strongly against slavery. 



THE WILMINGTON CONGREGA- 
TIONAL CHURCH; Number three 
building, erected in 1864. The first 
building was the mustering point for the 
Wilmington Minutemen on April 19, 
1775. 




REDEDICATION OF THE MIDDLESEX CANAL: Took THE HOME OF THE REV. ISAAC MORRILL, on Middle- 

place last fall, with officials of the Middlesex Canal Association sex Avenue. An ardent patriot, pastor of his church for 53 years, 

in charge of the ceremonies. About one half mile of the old canal he served in the French and Indian War at Ticonderoga, and In 

was rebuilt by the Commonwealth. the Revolution took an active role. It was he who dedicated 

Lexington Green, in ceremonies five years after that battle. 



School Committee 



Conmittee of the Tovm of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 197U. The present 
of the Committee is as follows: 

L. Barbara Hooper, Chairman 
Harry J. Landers, Vice Chairman 
John Brooks, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
John Nealon 
Richard Thackeray 

Wilmington opened its school doors on September 5> 197U» with a total enrollment of 5>U15. The High School 
enrollment as of October 1 was 1,i;8l. 

SCHOOL BUILDING PROGRAM 

During the calendar year of 197U> the School Committee, working in conjunction with the Permanent Building 
Committee, continued to gather the necessaiy information in compliance with the School Building Assistance 
Bureau's requirements. During the month of December, the Permanent Building Committee presented the cost 
data of a new high school to the School Coimnittee. On December 17, 197^4-, an informational meeting was held 
with Town Boards and Officials present. The purpose of this meeting was twofold: a) to share information 
relative to construction costs, sewage, topography, accreditation status, reimbursement status and other 
pertinent data; and, b) to request feedback from the various boards and representatives no later than 
January 10, 1975- It is hoped that a Special Town Meeting will be held in early 1975 for the purpose of 
having the Town consider future building needs. 

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING 

The School Committee negotiated contracts with the Nurses, Cafeteria Personnel and Teacher Aides relative to 
salaries and conditions of employment. As the current agreement with teachers, administrators, and 
secretaries expires in jTjne, 1975> the Coimnittee is now in the process of negotiating with these various 
groups. These negotiations will continue into 197$. As a result of a iniling by the State Labor Relations 
Board, the School Coimnittee was required to negotiate with Teacher Aides and Paraprofessionals for the first 
time. 

STAFF RECRUITMENT 

With the number of qualified teachers constantly rising, the School System received 2,000 inquiries and 
applications for a limited number of available positions. Applications were received from the following 
Colleges and Universities: Boston College, Boston University, Bridgewater State College, Westfield State 
College, Lowell State College, Salem State College, Emmanuel College, Regis College, Mem" mack College, 
University of Massachusetts, Lesley College, Tufts University, Harvard College, Fitchbiirg State College, 
Northeastern University, Lowell Technological Institute, Simmons College, Wellesley College and Boston State 
College. In addition to these local Colleges and Universities, a significant number of inquiries were 
received from out of state Universities. 



78 



At the administrative level the Committee, upon the recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools, elected 
Dr. George 0. Eisenberg for the position of High School Principal. This action came after an extensive 
search and a significant number of interviews with perspective candidates. 

CTIRRICITLI3M DEVELOPMENT AKD IMPROVEIMENT 

In an attempt to provide additional in-service training and curriculum development, the Committee, upon 
recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools, changed the Wednesday Dismissal Program at all elementary 
schools to 12:30 p.m. The Committee continued to update the curriculum, acting upon a number of requests of 
Principals, Directors, Department Chairmen, and Central Administration. Recommended textbook adoptions were 
acted upon by the Committee upon the recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools. Wilmington High School 
was placed on an extended day which now sees it in operation from 7s50 a.m. to l+sOO p.m. in order to 
accommodate the growing number of students in grades 9-12. This type of direction will be followed until 
space needs at this level are provided. 

PTTBLIC DTVOLYEiMENT IN Oim SCHOOLS 

The School Committee ordered the establishment of Parent Advisory Committees in all school districts during 
the 1973-7U school year. In an attempt to provide better communications with the general public, the 
Committee moved its meetings in 197U to the various schools and provided ample opportunity at each of these 
meetings for audience participation. Present plans call for continuation of the procedure in 1975. 

SCHOOL SURVEY COMPLETED 

During 197U» the Wilmington School Committee conducted a sxirvey of the citizenry for the purposes of 
gathering information from the general public as to their opinions of our total school system. The Committee 
takes this opportunity to express its appreciation to one of its members, Mr. John Nealon, for his tireless 
efforts in constructing this most comprehensive siorvey. The nximber of hours that Mr. Nealon unselfishly 
devoted to this project is hereby recognized by his colleagues as a job well done. The survey revealed the 
following: 

5,567 questionnaires were mailed and 1,2814. were returned, for a 23% ret\im. Beginning with 
question #2 the systemwide responses are: 







YES 


NO 


2. 


Would you recognize the Principal of this child's school if you met on the 
street? 


6h 


16 


3. 


Have you been in the school this year? 


95 


5 


h. 


Have you discussed this child with the teacher this year? 


87 


13 


5. 


Were your questions about your child answered to your satisfaction? 


82 


18 


6. 


Do you think the number of students in this child's class is too big? 


17 


83 


7. 
8. 


Do you think the nmber of students in this child's class is too small? 
Do you feel welcome in the school? 


3 
92 


97 
8 


9. 


Was the school clean - considering the time of day? 


90 


10 


10. 


Did you have any problems of cooperation with the teacher? 


9 


91 


11. 


Did you have any problems of cooperation with the principal? 


7 


93 


12. 


Do you feel this child is usually being challenged to do his best work? 


75 


25 


12a. 


Is there some class where you don't believe this? 


22 


78 


13. 


Does this child enjoy going to school? 


86 


1U 



79 



YES NO 

IJ4. Do you know how subjects such as Math, English, etc., are taught to this child? 58 k2 

15. Would you attend an evening seminar at this school to see how the subjects 

are taught? 75 25 

l5a. If yes - what night is best? Tuesday 2l| 

16. Does this child bring worksheets or tests home at least: Once a week 62 

17. Is this child asked to do more than he is able to do academically? Ij. 96 

18. Does this child talk about his subjects at least once a week? 87 13 

19. Do you think this child respects his teacher? 93 7 
19a. Is there a teacher they do not respect? 25 75 

20. Would you read a monthly paper which had feature articles on Teachers, 

Administrators, New Subjects in the schools, etc.? 89 11 

21. If issuing this paper caused the school budget to increase by $3,000, would 

you still want it? U8 $2 

22. Are you aware that the school system performs systemwide aptitude and 

achievement testing? 77 23 

22a. Should the overall results be made public? 75 25 

23. Are you aware that the school system has a Special Education staff and what 

their duties are? 66 3i+ 

23a. Would you know how to seek their assistance if you had a need? 57 h3 

2l\. Do you feel you know what is going on in this child's school? 75 25 

25. Are you aware that the System has Directors for major subject areas? 56 Uh 

26. Does your school have enough Parent Nights, Social Events (Pather/Son, 

Mother/Daioghter) , etc.? 70 30 

27. Do you like the report card format? 69 31 

28. Do you understand this child's report card? 91 9 

29. In your opinion, does this child's school have a discipline problem in class, 

gym, playground, etc.? 3U 66 

30. Should Grades 7 through 12 have some type of academic recognition? 82 I8 
30a. Should Grades 1 through 6 have academic recognition? 6k 36 

31 . Do you know how well this child is doing as compared to an average student 

in the same grade? i|6 Sh 

32. Do you think today's schools, what they teach, how they teach, and at what 

grade it's taught, differ much from when you were in school? 93 7 

33. Do you think young children (ages 5-12) in your nei^borhood argue and fi^t 

more than you did at that age? 27 73 



80 



YES NO 



3I+. Would you like to know what it costs to teach a subject at one school - 





and why it costs that? 


81 


19 




Are you aware of the new courses or methods brought into the schools in the 








last three years? 


57 


li3 


36. 


Are you aware of the new Public Relations Program of the School Committee? 


1|2 


58 


37. 


Are you generally pleased with this child's teacher(s)? 


89 


11 


37a. 


Are you dissatisfied with a teacher? 


18 


82 


38. 


Are you familiar with our IGE schools? 


62 


^8 




Are you aware of any repair work in the schools which has been neglected? 


16 


8ii 


1;0. 


Are you aware that the custodians and maintenance department do not report 








to the school department? 


23 


77 




If this child attended an IGE school - do you think they did: Better 


21 






Generally, are you satisfied with this child's education in the schools? 


83 


17 


U3. 


Should the following information be publicized? 








A. Vandalism by school ajid cost (no names). 


3\x 


6 




B. Alcohol and drug problems (no names). 


95 


5 




C. Performance on national achievement tests (no names). 


92 


8 




L. Background and qualifications of key Administrators, Teachers, etc. 


91 


9 

✓ 




E. Articles on the various Departments in the School System and what they do. 


93 


7 


H-H- • 


Do you think Wilmington has a need for better school facilities — forgetting 








for a moment the ways that it may be accomplished. 


36 


61; 




If given a choice, and knowing no more information than yoa do today, which 








of the following plans do you prefer? 








PLAN A - Build a new Hi^ School, make the West and North Intermediates 








elementary schools, and close some of the old 1+ and 6 room schools. 


29 






PLAN B - Start a program which had all of your children and your neighbor's 








children in school for 9 weeks and then on vacation for 3 weeks. 








and keep doing this 12 months a year. 


20 






PLAN C - Build an addition (larger than the present Hi^ School) to the 








High School, and additions to at least 3 other schools. 


35 






OTHER 








NO OPINION 


12 




U6. 


Do you know how teachers are evaluated? 


13 


87 


hi- 


Do you think high school students should evaluate teachers? 


38 


62 


U8. 


Do you think high school students should evaluate courses? 


63 


37 


U9. 


Do you think this type of survey should be taken every year? 


76 


2U 


50. 


In general, did this survey allow you to express your feelings on the 








questions asked? 


85 


15 



&. copy of the results of this survey with a school breakdown of responses is available in the Town Library 
md in the individual schools for yo\ir perusal. 

81 



RESIGNATIONS ACT) RETIREMENTS 



Requests for leaves of absence, resignations and retirements were received from 3U teachers for the followir 
reasons : 

Leaves of Absence; 



Sabbatical Leave 2 

Maternity Leave 3 

Illness 1 

To Teach in Indian Mission School 1 

(one year) 

TOTAL 7 

Resignations ; 

Continue Education 2 

Teach in Other Communities 5 

Professional Improvement 2 

Family Responsibility 7 

Overseas Teaching 1 

Counselled Out 1| 

Career Change 2 

TOTAL 23 

Retirements ; 1; 



The School Connnittee wishes to acknowledge the retirement of the four dedicated staff members who left aftei 
lengthy careers in our system. Mrs. Agnes Daley will be remembered by many for her years at the Mildred 
Rogers School as teacher and principal. In her last few years in Wilmington, Mrs. Daley seirved as a Reading: 
Teacher in the elementary schools. Her total years of service was twenty-seven (27). Mrs. Evelyn Andersen 
served as our Director of Art for thirty (30) years, coming to Wilmington when, at one time, she served as 
our only Art Teacher. During her years as Director she continually strived to improve Art Education in the 
Wilmington Public Schools. Both Mrs. Helen Roth, twenty- four (2l+) years service, and Mrs. Irene Rogers, 
twenty-five (2$) years, served in our elementary and intermediate schools and were of great assistance to 
oiiT school principals in orientating new teachers to the system. To these four ladies goes our heartfelt 
appreciation for a job well done and our best wishes for a fruitfiil retirement. 

The Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 5» ''973» ^Jid ending June 21, 
197U« The Committee held twenty-five (2^) regular meetings, twenty-two (22) special meetings, ei^t (8) 
meetings relative to collective bargaining, one (l) grievance hearing, one (1) arbitration hearing, for a 
total of fifty-seven (57) meetings for the year ^^ik' 

As the area of population trends is of paramount concern to Committee members, Administrators, Teachers and 
Parents, the projected enrollments are incorporated into the Committee report. It must be remembered by all 
concerned that these statistics are calculated estimates which must be reassessed on an annual basis. There 
are a number of factors that can alter these figures such as drastic changes in births, housing developments 
low cost housing, and the like. 

The Committee extends its sincere appreciation to Town Officials, Town Departments, and to the citizens of 
Wilmington for their fine cooperation and assistance during the past year. 



82 



Superintendent of Schools 



I am pleased to submit the Animal Report of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools for the year 

The School Administration implemented a significant change in the High School in an attempt to alleviate the 
extremely crowded conditions prevailing. An extended day concept was put into effect whereby the school 
remained in session from 7:50 a.m. imtil l+tOO p.m., with a nine period day being utilized. Grades 10-12 
attended periods 1-7 with grade nine entering at 9:30 a.m. and attending periods 3-9. Thus, the school day 
for grade nine was from 9:30 a.m. to l+:00 p.m. This concept of scheduling pupils will no doubt be further 
extended in the absence of sufficient classroom space. 

During 197U» a significant amount of curriculum changes were brought about due to the efforts of adminis- 
trators, directors, and the teaching staff. Some of the highlights are as follows: 

English ; Ihiring the summer of 197^+ the Language Arts Committee composed of elementary teachers and the 
Director of English continued their efforts, which began in 1973» aJ^d wrote an entirely new Language Arts 
Curriculum K-6. The Curriculum Guide identified and explained the philosophy and goals of the program which 
emphasizes oral and written communication. The writing of the c\irriculum was a major step in the development 
of a consistent K-12 program. A copy of this guide is available in the Town Library. 

The High School English teachers refined and expanded the elective program and revised the English require- 
ment for sophomores. Sophomores are now required to take "Communication Skills II", a one semester course 
intended to improve vocabulary, thinking, and writing skills. Second-semester sophomores elect their second 
semester coiirse from a limited number of upper year electives. 

Two student sujrveys during the year illustrated the following: A student survey was conducted in the Spring 
of 197U with students in grade nine. Eighty-seven (87) percent of grade nine students favorably responded 
to the structure of the program; that is, changing teachers for different contents. Forty- two (I4.2) percent 
responded that their interests in English had increased as a result of the program. In the elective survey, 
ei^ty-four (8l|) percent of the students in grades eleven and twelve expressed a desire to continue to have 
the opportunity to select their own English course. This survey further revealed a consistently favorable 
i response to the program and instruction of the teachers. 

Science ; During 197U the Science program expanded its Science Cuj?riculum Improvement Study (SCIS) Program 
into grades three and six. This program is now offered in grades three through six. 

The "Metric System" has been introduced as a pilot program in three of our elementary schools. This new 
curriculum will expand to all elementary schools in the near future. Plans are now being developed to offer 
several Metric System Workshops in the evenings for parents. 

At the High School level a new course entitled "Know New Eiigland" has been added to the curriculum. This 
co\irse describes the ITatxiral Histoiy, Geology, and Ecology of New England, and the Wilmington area, in 
particular. Clinical Practices and Medical Microbiology semester courses have also been added, attracting 
j students who desire to enter the fields of Medical Technology, Biology and Microbiology. 

The "Chemistry Magic Show" which has proven to be extremely successful has now been added to the c\irriculuin 
as a minor course for credit. This venture brings secondary staff members and Hi^ School chemistry 
students to our elementary schools, and it generates enthusiasm and interest in the sciences at an early age. 



83 



Social Studies ; The fall of 197U saw a new Social Studies Program implemented in grades one through six. 
This adoption was the culmination of a year's study by a committee composed of teachers and principals. 

The Social Studies Program entitled "The Holt Data Bank System" was created to respond to the practical 
concerns of the classroom teacher. Motivating children, overcoming reading difficulties, realizing worthy 
objectives, and locating materials are examples of a few of these persistent concerns. 

The Holt Data Bank System provides a wide selection of teaching materials integrated into diverse teaching 
strategies. It recognizes that varied resoirrces by themselves stimulate the learner and heightens interest 
in the classroom. A wider set of teaching materials makes possible a wider range of teaching strategies. 
The Hold Data Bank System offers the widest array of teaching materials to support highly varied instruc- 
tional strategies. 

Reading ; During the 197^4- school year the Wilmington Reading Department received national recognition for it 
document entitled "The Wilmington Reading Curriculum; A Guide To Teaching Reading K-3." It has been cited 
in the September, 197U issue of Research in Education as a valuable contribution to education and will be 
distributed by ERIC (Education Research Infonnation Center) in hard cover and microfiche. This document 
was the combined effort of the Director of Reading, our reading teachers and our elementary teachers who 
served for months preparing the guide. A copy is available in the Town Library, In addition, the guide is 
one of twelve chosen to be reviewed in a publication by the National Coimcil of Teachers of English entitled 
"Recommended English Language Arts Curriculum G^lide, K-12, 197U'" 

The Volunteer Reading Tutor Program has expanded to include two schools - Glen Road and Wildwood. The 
voltinteers - citizens of the community - are coordinated by Mrs. Nan Coulberth and trained by our Reading 
Department . 

Art ; During the summer of 197U> the ceramics instruction was greatly improved by a Ceramics Workshop. The 
Director of Art, working in conjunction with our Industrial Design Instructor, planned for maximum utiliza- 
tion of all ceramics equipment in our schools. Construction of actual examples and charts has served to 
provide effective instirictional aids in the high school, intermediate and elementary art program. 

A traveling art exhibit composed of student art, grades K-12, was organized with plans for it to be in each 
school building and several commimity locations for a week at a time. The Art Director hopes to provide a 
better correlation between classroom activities and the role of the artist in our society. 

Industrial Arts ; A new course entitled "Exploring Power Mechanics" was introduced in September of 197i+> 
This new course introduces students to all facets of small engines and the various methods of powering 
engines. The course begins with an introduction of the six simple machines listed as the lever, the wheel 
and axle, the pulley, the inclined plane, the screw, and the wedge. The electrical systems of powering 
engines are explored in detail as well as the environmental factors. Students have the opportunity to 
assemble and disassemble small engines as a classroom experience. 

Neighborhood Youth Corps ; This program continued into its second year and to date illustrates the following 
type of activity; 







Students 


Weeks 


Hrs. 
Wkly. 


Student 
Payroll 


Federal 
Administrative 
Costs 


Total 
Cost 


Summer/73 




55 


7 


38 


$27,066 


$4,500 


$ 31,566 


School Yr. 


73M 


38 


28 


15 


$29,526 


$5,500 


$ 35,026 


Summer/7U 




82 


7 


30 


$31,236 


$14,500 


$ 35,736 


School Yr. 


74/75 


20 


ho 


8 


$12,800 


$3,000 


$ 15,800 


Total 














$118,128 



The program, coordinated by the Administrator of Work Study, brings revenues directly into the homes of thos 
who qioalify for this federally funded program. 



Name Gtp~ 
Number 



Received 



Title I 
Title II 



« 36,922 



PL87ii 

Occupationa] i;d. 
Head Start 
Sp. Ed. 

Title II Sp. Grant 

National Defense Education Act 



9,3hO 
36,315 

5,978 
11,U61 

6,0i;9 



-0- 

50,000 

$156,065 



Reorganization ; During the 19?!+ school year, the areas of Special Education, Nurses and Counseling were 
bro-aght together under the direction of a single administrator entitled "Administrator of Pupil Personnel 
Services." In addition, it was necessary to add an additional administrator to the Central Office staff to 
assist in the supervision and direction of our vocational programs, nonprofessional persoxmel and our rapidly 
expanding transportation network. 

Chapter 766 ; As the Bartley-Daly Law ("better known as Chapter 766) became law at about the same time as our 
re-organization occurred, one of the first acts of the PPS Administrator was to establish a basic core 
evaluation team (CET) and a streamlined procedure for dealing with the implementation of the new law. Next, 
after meeting with the building principals and other personnel, Dr. Homefield designated a coordinator of 
testing who restructured the testing program to include appropriate tests and changes in the times and 
procedures for ad m inistering them so that the systemwide test results may be mpre productively utilized by 
teachers in working with their students. 

To help each of the PPS departments better define and understand its role in relation to the other services, 
regular meetings have been held both separately and jointly. 

The Administrator of Pupil Personnel Services, working with the Director of Special Education, Learning 
Disabilities specialists, Speech Therapists and Nurses conducted two orientation programs for parents of 3 
and U year old children. He also established two screening teams and made arrangements for the registration 
and screening of pre-school (3 and i| year old) children at two schools on two Saturdays. As a result, 
seventy children were screened for health, vision, hearing, speech and learning problems. Additionally, 
similar teams were used in screening all kindergarten children. 

The Pupil Personnel Services Administrator met with parent groups and teachers at all levels in order to 
explain the new Pupil Personnel Services composition and the plans to implement Chapter 766. In addition, a 
number of service organizations and special interest groups had the opporttinity to hear Dr. Homefield explain 
his new role. 

In order to make teachers aware of their responsibilities as members of the newly established Pupil Study 
Teams and Core Evaluation Teams (CET) and to train them in procedures for assessing the achievement levels 
of their students, administrators addressed the elementary, intermediate school and secondary school teachers 
as a prelude to a visit by the Chairman of the CET and a Learning Disabilities specialist. 

The nucleus CET consists of a school psychologist (chairman), a physician, a school nurse, and a Reading 
specialist. The rest of the Core Team is made up of the child's parent(s), his teacher(s), appropriate 
specialist(s) , his co\mselor and principal. In compliance with the requirements of Chapter 766, the CET is 
administered by the Director of Special Education. By coordinating the efforts of everyone concerned, it is 
expected that the considerable backlog (from last year) of students to be evaluated may be virtually 
eliminated by the end of the c^irrent calendar year. To achieve this goal the CET has been working full time 
and is planning to conduct evening and weekend meetings. 



85 



Class of 197^; : The status of the class of 197^1 shows the following: 

Percent to four year State Colleges and Universities 11. 5 

Percent to four year Non-State Colleges and Universities I3.O 

Percent to two year State Colleges 10.5 

Percent to two year Non-State Colleges 5-0 

Percent to Niirsing Schools 2.0 

Percent to other post high school education 6.0 

Total Percent to further education i;9.0 

Percent to working forces i|6.0 

Percent to military service 1.0 

Percent to marriage 1.0 

Other U.O 

Listed "below are the colleges, universities, technical schools and niirsing schools to which o^xr graduat 
have been accepted for the fall: 

Less Than 1| Year Colleges 



Bay State Jr. College 
Berwick Academy 

Beth Isreal Hospital (Dental Asst. Program) 
Boston University School of Graduate Dentistry 

(Dental Asst. Program) 
Bunker Hill Community College 
Burdett School 
Endicott Jr. College 
Fisher Jr. College 
Franklin Institute 
Katharine Gibts School 



Lawrence Memorial Hospital School of Nursing 
Maiden Hospital School of Nursing 
Middlesex Commimity College 
New England Memorial Hospital School of 

Radiological Technology 
Northern Essex Community College 
School of Fashion Design 
Springfield Technical Community College 
Sylvania Technical School 
Wentworth Institute 



Four Year Colleges & Universities 



Babson College 

Ball State University @ Indiana 

Bates College 

Bentley College 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Brandeis University 

Clark University 

East Carolina University 

Gordon College 

Lowell Technological Institute 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Massachusetts Maritime Academy 

McGill University 

Merrimack College 

Michigan State University 

Mount Holyoke College 

Northland College 

Northeastern University 

Northeastern University (Boston Bouve) 

Norwich University 

Ohio State University 

Pembroke State University (N.C.) 

Regis College 

Ricker College 

St. Anselm's College 

St. Joseph's College 

Smith College 

Southeastern Massachusetts University 



Springfield College 

State College at Boston 

State College at Bridgewater 

State College at Fitchburg 

State College at Framingham 

State College at North Adams 

State College at Salem 

State College at West field 

State College at Worcester 

Stockbridge School of Agriculture 

Stonehill College 

Suffolk University 

Swarthmore College 

Syracuse University 

U. S. Merchant Marine Academy 

University of Colorado 

University of Connecticut 

University of Illinois & Champaign-Urbana 

University of Massachusetts @ Amherst 

University of Massachusetts @ Boston 

University of New Hampshire 

Vassar College 

Wells College 

Western Connecticut State College 
Wheaton College 
Williams College 

Worcester Polytechnical Institute 

Windham College 

Yanktown 



In conclusion, I would like to extend my appreciation to our School Committee, Administrators, teachers 
parents and students who contributed their efforts to our school system during 197U. 



86 



Shawsheen Valley Tech 



KAMES OF MEMBERS TERM EXPIRES 

BEDFORD 

Charles Freni 1977 
Joseph Rogers 1975 

BILLERICA 

Kenneth L. Buffum I976 
Paul Heffeman 1975 

BURLINGTON 

Wallace B. Haigh I976 
John G. Murphy 1975 

TEWKSBURY 

Wilson E. Brazile I976 
Richard Griffin 1977 

WIIMrNGTON 

Eugune L. Kritter 1977 
Frank McLean I976 

On March 26, 197i4-> an organizational meeting was held. Eugene L. Kritter, representing Wil mi ngton was 
unanimously appointed Chairman for the year 197U-75- Burlington's representative John G. Murphy was 
appointed Vice Chairman and Billerica's Kenneth L. Buffum continued in his role as Secretary- Treasiirer, a 
position he has held for several years. 

On May 28, the vocational School Committee took action to change the By-laws so that the annual organiza- 
tional meeting be held each year at the first regular meeting, following the latest date on which the annual 
town election of any member town is held. This By-law amendment was subsequently approved by town meetings 
in all five towns. The Committee, broken down into several sub-groups, worked during 197U to bring into 
reality the construction phase of the school's addition that is anticipated to open in September 1975- The 
addition will double the enrollment of students from 78O to 1,1+00. During the year the Adult Evening Program 
was expanded; the Administrative staff was enlarged to include one Area Coordinator and a new Assistant 
Director was added to the ranks filling the vacancy created early in the year by Joseph Gorman. 

The Committee continued its dialogue and open communication policy with parents and with students through 
the student council. 

Through administrative input, the Committee kept abreast of new legislation, especially Chapters 766 and 
622 focusing on how the laws could be quickly and adeq\iately implemented in the co-educational facility. 

On behalf of the School Committee I humbly thank the citizens, taxpayers and officials in the five towns who 
continually support and reinforce our presence in the district. In return, we pledge continued strivijig for 
occupational excellence and to keep the student as our number one priority. 



87 



Superintendent - Shawsheen Tech 



Our administrators, onr staff and the School Committee have teen committed to providing 750 day time, full- 
time students with highly skilled occupational trades that will provide a valuable asset to area industrial 
complexes: resulting in meaningful work for our graduates. 

The year 197U saw construction commence on Phase II of onr hxiilding, which is well under way and barring 
unforeseen delays, the addition will open on target in September 1975. The addition will double the student 
enrollment to 1,14.00 students and expand the possibilities for academic students who attend the vocational 
school during afternoon hours gaining valuable exposure to shop programs. The expansion of the facility 
will also broaden the opportunities for adults participating in the evening school program. 

Highlights of the Year 

Hi^lights were many diiring 197U - our participation in the Massachusetts Poultry Association at the 
Burlington Mall during the week of May 13 gave us a great opportunity for visibility in the area. Our 
culinary art students, working in shifts manned a booth, cooked, prepared and served thousands of chicken 
pies with the proceeds going into the senior class treasury. 

In May, the second annual Art Festival for students in the five towns in the district was held and again 
proved successful and popular. This affair and others staged during the year to involved schools in the 
district have a hidden agenda of coordinating and developing a community spirit among all the schools in 
Billerica, Bedford, Burlington, Tewksbury and Wilmington. It is our intent to foster a feeling of community 
within the district. We do not see ourselves as a separate institution but an integral part of all educa- 
tional facilities in the district. 

Other highlights of the year included a Massachusetts State Board of Education meeting held at Shawsheen Tec) 
with Commissioner Gregory Anrig present. Superintendents from area schools as well as the Northeast Region 
attended this meeting, toured Shawsheen Tech and enjoyed l\inch, cooked, prepared and served by students in 
o\ir Culinary Arts Department. The State Advisory Coimcil on Vocational Technical Education also conducted 
its monthly meeting here in October. 

Community Projects 

From time to time, our students, in an effort to get out of the classroom and into a work environment, 
become involved in commimity projects which benefit them greatly by providing valiiable hands on experience. 
The programs also provide a return of tax dollars to the towns involved since students provide labor free of 
charge. One such project this year was the renovation of Burlington's Center School into administrative 
offices. Town meeting members appropriated an estimated $30,000 for the job, which was utilized generally 
for materials since carpentry and electrical students provided the manpower. 

Also late in 197Uj carpentry, electrical, drafting and metal fabrication students began a house building 
project on Fox Hill Road, Burlington, sponsored by local contractor Robert Murray, financed by the Burlingtoi 
Bank and Trust. A watering trough was re-built in Billerica Center, and various smaller projects were 
tackled by students in other communities including the completion of a storage building for the Wilmington 
Housing Authority by students in carpentry and electrical. 



88 



Summer School 



620 students from the five towns attended the six week summer school program, many of them making up courses 
not offered in their home town schools. Under the Direction of Donald Ayer, Summer School Coordinator, the 
program was one of the most successful in the short history of Shawsheen Tech. 107 students from Shawsheen 
Tech attended the six week program, which in reality is a 12 month school year affording them the opportunity 
to collect additional credits for early gradiiation. 

Make-up courses were provided for 165 students from the five towns. Driver Education with in-car training 
ran for two sessions involving a total of fifty students. Physical Education classes, scheduled for morning 
and afternoon, catered to 70 students plus eighteen special needs children. 

Graduates - Senior Placement 

Shawsheen Technical Hi^ School graduated 166 seniors on June 2, 197U« The following gives a complete 
summation concerning the placement of the graduating seniors as of May 22: 

Graduating Class - 166 Seniors 



Employed in own field 


133 


80.129^ 


Going on to higher education 


8 


i|.8l°/o 


Entering the Armed Services 


k 


2.i|19^ 


Employed in other fields 


9 




Wot placed due to special circumstances: 






Moving 


2 


1 .21% 


Medical 


3 


1.81% 


Marriage (not going to work) 


2 


1.21% 


In process of securing employment 




3.02% 


TOTAL 


166 


100.01% 



Numher of seniors serviced by Placement Office: 166 / 166 x 100 = 100% 

The State Advisory Council on Vocational Technical Education held their monthly meeting in our facility in 
October. In August Paul F. Ahem was hired as Assistant Superintendent-Director replacing Joseph P. Gorman, 
who accepted a position as Superintendent-Director of a vocational facility in the western part of 
Massachusetts . 

In January 197U> James W. Carroll was hired as an Area Coordinator for the school district. This state 
fimded position, the first of its kind in the Commonwealth, is an attempt to coordinate occupational, 
industrial arts and vocational programs in the five towns and to develop educational alternatives for all 
students. 

In February, Middlesex Community College students started courses in Metal Fabrication, Welding and 
Electronics at Shawsheen Tech as part of a program entitled Project Interact whereby vocational facilities 
and community colleges are working to make ma.Yi mum use of available facilities in the area. 

In Ma-rch, Senior Student Dom Genetti, a Bedford resident was presented a trophy for outstanding culinary arts 
at Shawsheen Tech. The award is presented to one student from each of eight vocational schools by the 
Boston Branch of the International Food Service Executive Association. During the same month, Robert Pease, 
Billerica, a commercial art student was recognized for his winning design for the Billerica Town Report. 

Special Programs 

A Technical Training Program for seniors in the five towns was implemented during 197U allowing seniors from 
area schools to spend time at Shawsheen Tech for short term occupational skill exposure in the area of 
secretarial science, commercial art and electronics. 

During the summer program, students with learning disabilities were accepted by the School Committee and 23 
students were admitted for a special orientation. Parents were also involved in the program that allowed 
vocational educators an opportunity to identify early the special problems of students so they co\ild be 
prepared to implement meaningful programs by September. 



89 



On April 25, an Open House was held during evening hours and was attended by hundreds of parents, citizens, 
taxpayers and officials from the five towns. These events have always heen well attended and provides an 
opportunity for citizens to view first hand the facility and the kinds of programs offered. 

Public Relations 

Utilizing the part-time services of an experienced journalist, news of OTir school is continually in area 
newspapers and alerts the public of new trends, new concerns and the continuing process of education at 
Shawsheen Tech. These articles appear weekly to keep citizens aware of our existence, to describe the many 
and varied programs being conducted at Shawsheen Tech and to strengthen conmimications between the school 
and the communities in the district. 

Shawsheen Tech is now participating in the LaCoin program which involves several libraries in the area and 
a radio station WLTI-FM at Lowell Tech. Guidance Director Bruce Perkins and myself have broadcast on the 
station dealing with matters of administration as they relate to the vocational school. John Childs, 
carpentry instructor in the Handyman Co\irse has also been a guest on a recent program describing the course 
that is offered to area adults diiring evening ho\irs. 

As the emphasis on vocational education and occupational competency continues in our technological society, 
I personally extend an invitation to officials, citizens and taxpayers to visit our school during the 
regular work day. We are always happy to conduct tours for groups or individxials and to explain the 
multidimensional facets of our five year old operation. 



In January 1973, "the position of Area Coordinator was created in order to expedite closer cooperation betwee: 
the regional school and the five participating systems within the Shawsheen Valley Regional School District. 

In setting educational priorities dealing with occupational education within the vocational school district, 
a series of meetings were held. These included commonality groups at all levels of administration including 
Superintendents, Guidance Directors, Principals, and Department Chairpeople in the areas of Industrial Arts 
and Business Education. The primary focus was on the following objectives. 

A flexibility entry program for students (seniors) from within the participating school systems to 
enter programs at Shawsheen Tech for short term training programs. Also included was the estab- 
lishment of a process for students to enter the vocational school in grades 10, 11 and 12 that 
would be a contin\iation of a career education program within the schools in the five towns. 

As a result of cooperative efforts between the administration of the five participating school 
systems and the vocational school's administrative staff, 25 students from the senior classes 
throu^out the district were allowed to gain short term skill training on a full time basis. 

ly^y position was designed to include proposal writing for financial assistance from the Mass. State Departmeni 
of Education and Federal funding sources. In February 197U, the participating systems submitted ten occu- 
pational proposals to the Division of Occupational Education. Eight proposals were eventually funded for 
over $90,000. These programs included the area of Business Education, Industrial Arts and Home Economics. 
The proposals submitted from the five school systems demonstrated a high degree of expertise on the part of 
department heads and directors who wrote and submitted them. This expertise was evident in the form of 
developing programs that would equip and prepare students for the world of work. It is important to note 
that these programs will affect approximately 1500 students in the district at various levels. 

The Mass. State Department of Education has established occupational competency as its number one priority 
for the 197U-75 school year. The major concern is in developing viable instructional programs for the 
general student. . .who has been defined as students (approximately 22%) not enrolled in a further education 
or occupational vocational program. 

90 



The career education concepts include goals that will allow students to reach the beginning of a career path; 
have well developed tasic skills; a positive self-concept; an understanding of ways of using leisiire time 
and the appreciation and ability to function and participate in society. The main thrust of career education 
or occupational competency is to prepare all students for a personal life and successful work by improving 
the basis for occupational choice; facilitating the acquisition of job skills; and enhancing educational 
achievement in all subject areas and at all levels by making education more meaningful and relevajit. 

At this writing, there is a collaborative effort within the school district to design and develop a model 
program of instruction that will focus on the general student. With an initial group of approximately 75 
students, our aims are to assist them in gaining an identifiable job entry skill; establish a career 
direction and offer support in job placement. 

We are also concerned with student attitudes towards work and their ability to work with others. We will 
design the program to include those skills needed in daily decision making that is pertinent to personal 
life as well as the world of work. 

In conclusion, I would highlight the sensitivity and concern of the School Committee at Shawsheen Tech and 
the Superintendent-Director, Benjamin Wolk, for contintiing to develop the vocational facility in Billerica 
as an integral part of the schools within the district and in supporting the development of viable occupa- 
tional programs within the district. 

I would like to take this opportunity to indicate that success in developing occupational programs within the 
Shawsheen Valley Regional School District is and will be the result of cooperation between educators from all 
five school systems. It is also important that the cooperation and support of all six school conmiittees be 
a contintial strong force. 




Wilmington High School Band. 




High School Cheerleaders. 



91 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 2, 1974 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday, the Second of March, A. D. 1974 at 
9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the 
election of Town Offices: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: Two 
Selectmen for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the School 
Committee for the term of three years; One member of the Housing Authority for a term of two years, (unexpirec 
term) ; One member of the Redevelopment Authority for a term of five years and One member of the Regional 
Vocational /Technical School District Committee for a term of three years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday, the 
Ninth day of March A. D. 1974 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles. 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan, 

at 9:45 a.m., as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber, it 
was voted to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 

This was the first election under the new law which requires Towns to be set up in precinct form. 

This election was held in the Gymnasium and all (6) precincts were delineated by signs and rope divisions and 
worked out very well because there was a light turnout of voters. However, State elections will be heavier 
and parking will become a problem unless we vote in the designated schools. 

All voting machines were opened and the Zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and Voter Identification 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. 

The Polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. 

At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed and the printer packs were removed from the back of the voting 
machines and one copy was given to the tally clerks and the other was posted outside the railing so that each 
candidate could add up his own totals at once. There was only one absentee ballot cast. 

All of the totals from the 25 voting machines plus the absentee ballot were recorded and declaration thereof 
made, as by law is directed, and were for the following: 

SELECTMEN - Three years (Vote for two ) 
Elected James F. Banda, 7 Marie Drive 

Elected George W. Boylen, Jr. , 2 Ledgewood Road 

Others 

Blanks 



92 



725 
590 
3 

390 
1708 



MODERATOR - Annually (Vote for one) 

Elected John M. Callan , 571 Wobum Street 691 

Blanks 163 

854 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for Two) 

Elected John Brooks, 300 Salem Street 525 

Elected Harry J. Landers, 88 Clark Street 608 

David J. Dingle, 63 Salem Street 281 
Blanks 29A 

1708 

WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Two year unexpired term (Vote for one) 

Bruce Gordon, Oak Street 265 

Elected Barbara H. Larson, 445 Middlesex Avenue 537 

Blanks 51 

Others 1 

854 

WILMINGTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Five Years (Vote for one) 

Elected Carl A. Backman, Jr. , 149 Aldrich Road 77 

Others 5 
Blanks 772 

854 

SHAWSHEEN VALLEY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE - Three years 

Elected Eugene L. Kritter, 11 Pilling Road 726 

Blanks 128 

854 

All the elected officials present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the 
Town Clerk. Those who were absent presented themselves before the Town Clerk on Monday, March 4th, and were 
then sworn in to their elected offices. 

The results of this election were read at 9:30 p.m. There were 854 votes cast. It was a light vote but 
some of the voters did not understand how to use the voting machine for a write-in even though the clerks 
instructed them on the procedure. Thus the tally of these write-ins slowed the process of tabulation. 



Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 9. 1974 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr, John M. Callan at 1:45 p.m., 
there being a quorum present. 

Before the meeting was called the Girl Scouts held a Flag bearers ceremony, the following Sunday being 
National Girl Scout Sunday. Miss Janice Spada, Student Town Moderator delivered a short speech. It was 
well received. 

Rev. Joseph Baggetta led the meeting in prayer, 

Mr, Callan began the reading of the Warrant and was interrupted by a motion from Mr. James Banda: "I move 
that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each 
article by number." So voted, 

ARTICLE 2. To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 
No committee reports were offered. 



93 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropriati 
a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that we pass over Article 3 and take no action 
thereon. Voted to pass over this article unanimously. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1974 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than 
one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda, Chairman of the Selectmen: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1974, in accordance with the provisions of General Lawsj 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note 
or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 17." Motion voted unanimously. Finance Committee recommended approval. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries of 
the several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Christian G. Bachman, Chairman of the Finance Committee: "I move that the several and respectivt 
sums as recommended by the Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
appropriated for the purpose set forth in Article 5, each item to be taken up separately and voted on, subjecl 
to amendment." Motion so voted. 

ACCORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TAXATION OR TRANSFER : 

Motion by Mr. Anthony L. Leverone to take the School budget out of order and act on it first. So voted. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
Total Salaries 
Total Non-Salary Items 
Federal Monies 

Public Law 874 

Public Law 85-864 

Public Law 88-210 

(Motion by Mr. John Brooks, Chairman of the School Committee: "I move that Article 5, School 
Department Salaries and total Non-Salary items be amended to read in the amount of 
$5,937,747,00and that said amount be reduced by $100,000.00 of available Public Law 874 and 
Public Law 85-864 funds and further reduced by $20,000.00 from the salary account for a net 



balance of $5,817,747.00 to be raised by taxation." $5,817,747.00 

So voted. Main motion voted as amended. 

Vocational Training 6,000.00 

Regional Vocational School District 267,909.00 

TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 6,091,656.00 

GENERAL GOVERNME NT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 2,500.00 

Expenses 6,250.00 

8,750.00 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 12,200.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Leverone: "I move to amend Selectmen, Elections Salaries from $12,200 to 
$3,532 to be raised by taxation. Motion lost.) 

Expenses 9,228.00 

Capital Outlay 

21,428.00 



9k 



Registrars of Voters 

Salaries $ 5,000.00 

Expenses 4,200.00 

9,200.00 

Finance Committee 

Salaries 600.00 

Expenses 3,825.00 

4,425.00 

Town Manager 

Salaries, Town Manager 24,146.00 

Other Salaries 9,044.00 

Expenses 1,100.00 

34,290.00 

Community & Economic Development 

Salaries 1,000.00 

Expenses 5,000.00 

6,000.00 

Town Accountant 

Salaries, Town Accountant 14,495.00 

Other Salaries 8,610.00 

Expenses 550.00 

23,655.00 

Treasurer 

Salaries, Administrative Asst 13,258.00 

Other Salaries 8,367.00 

Expenses 1,825.00 

Tax Title Foreclosures 15,000.00 

38,450,00 

Collector 

Salaries, Collector 10,942.00 

Other Salaries 8,367.00 

Expenses 5,220.00 

I 24,529.00 
Town Clerk 

Salaries, Town Clerk 10,943.00 

Other Salaries 8,610.00 

Expenses 650.00 

Capital Outlay 964.00 

(Amendment by Mrs. Esther L. Russell, Town Clerk: "I move to amend the Town Clerk's budget 
in line item "Capital Outlay" from zero to $964.00 in order to purchase two new electric 
typewriters for my office. This amount to be raised by taxation and appropriated for said 

purpose." So voted. Voted as amended.) 

21,167.00 

Board of Assessors 

Salaries, Principal Assessor 15,649.00 

Other Salaries 13,189.00 

Expenses 2,922.00 

31,760.00 

Town Counsel 

Salaries (Retainer) 10,000.00 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 7,500.00 

17,500.00 

Town Hall 

Salaries 13,812.00 

Expenses 17 ,000.00 

30,812.00 

Planning Board 

Salaries 3,000.00 

Expenses 23,710.00 



I'lst Amendment by Mr. Boylen: "I move to reduce the amount of $23,710 to $14,000 on Planning 
loard Expenses." Lost. 

2nd Amendment by Mr. Caira: "I move that Planning Board Expenses be reduced from $23,710 to 
15,000. Lost.) 



95 



Standing vote on main motion: Yes - 164 No - 153 Motion carries. 

Capital Outlay 

Planning Board Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salaries, Chief 

Lieutenant 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

(Finance Committee amendment: "I move that the sum of $283,748 be appropriated for Salaries - 
Patrolmen: the sum of $283,748 be raised by transfer from the Revenue Sharing Account, with a 
balance of zero to be raised from taxation. Voted as amended.) 

Traffic (Policewomen) 

Clerks 

Miscellaneous Details 

(Finance Committee amendment: "I move that the sum of $24,000 be appropriated for Police, 
Miscellaneous Details; the sum of $16,252 to be raised by transfer from Revenue Sharing Account, 
and the balance of $7,748 to be raised by taxation." Voted as amended.) 

Police Dog Officers 

Vacations 

Sick Leave 

Paid Holidays 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Constable 

Salaries 

Fire Department 

Salaries, Chief 

Deputy Chief 

Lieutenants 

Privates 

(Finance Committee amendment: "I move that the sum of $262,233 be appropriated for Fire Depart- 
ment Salaries, Privates; and the sum of $250,000 be raised by transfer from Revenue Sharing 
Account and the balance of $12,233 be raised by taxation." Voted as amended.) 

Call Fire & Ambulance 

Vacations 

Sick Leave 

Paid Holidays 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Civil Defense 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Dog Officer 

Salaries 

(Amendment by Mr. Joseph Balestrieri: "I move to amend the Dog Officer's budget under 
"Salaries" from $3,840 to $9,300 to put this office on a full-time basis. This money to be 
raised by taxation, and appropriated for said purpose." Amendment lost by a voice vote.) 

Expenses 

Building Inspector 

Salaries, Building Inspector 



96 



Building Inspector (continued) 

Other Salaries $ 

Expenses 

Board of Appeals 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Sealer of Weights &. Measures 

Salaries 

Expenses 

TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Town Engineer 

Salaries, Town Engineer 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Highway Department 

Salaries, Superintendent 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $133,900 be appropriated for Highway 
Department Expenses; $45,000 to be raised by transfer from Ch. 1140, Acts of 1973 Account, 
and the balance of $88,900 to be raised by taxation" Voted as amended.) 

Capital Outlay 

Drainage Projects 

Sidewalk Program 

Public Street Lights 

(Finance Committee amendment: "I move that the sum of $75,000 be appropriated for Public 
Street Lights; $13,000 to be raised by transfer from the Electric Utility Study Account #995 
and a balance of $62,000 to be raised by taxation." Voted as amended.) 

Road Machinery Expenses 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Cemetery 

Salaries, Superintendent 



9,920.00 
2,350.00 
24,433.00 

800.00 
245.00 
1,045.00 

1,375.00 
50.00 
1,425.00 

472,798.00 



22,500.00 
38,530.00 
2,050.00 
700.00 
63,780,00 

15,875.00 
175,766.00 
88,900.00 





25,000.00 
50,000.00 
62,000.00 



35,400.00 
9,450.00 
2,500.00 




54,650.00 
77,600.00 



18,000.00 
7 , 100 . 00 



15,000.00 
2,600.00 



11,560.00 
2,200.00 



11,997.00 



97 



Cemetery (continued) 

Other Salaries 

(Finance Ccnranittee amendment: "I move that the sum of $43,660 be appropriated for Cemetery 
Department, Other Salaries; $9,385 to be raised by transfer from the Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Account and a balance of $34,275 to be raised by taxation." Voted as amended.) 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Parks 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salaries, Director 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Garbage Collection 

(Finance Committee amendment: "I move that the sum of $41,900 be appropriated for Garbage 
Collection; $25,000 to be raised by transfer from the Revenue Sharing Account and the balance 
of $16,900 to be raised by taxation." Amendment voted after a standing vote: Yes - 201 No - 56 

Town Dump 

(Finance Committee amendment: "I move that the sum of $75,000 be appropriated for Town Dump; 
$50,000 to be raised by transfer from Revenue Sharing Account and the balance of $25,000 to be 
raised by taxation." Voted as amended.) 

Drug Dependency Problems 

Mental Health 

Lowell Mental Health Association (voted to add this item) 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 



VETERANS' AID 

Veterans' Aid & Benefits 
Salaries, P. T. Agent 
Other Salaries. . . , 

Expenses 

Assistance, Veterans. 

TOTAL VETERANS' AID . . , . 



MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
School Maintenance & Operations 

Salaries, Superintendent 

Salaries, Others 

Contractual Services 

Expenses 

(Mr. Sterling C. Morris' amendment; "I move that the expense account under School Maintenance 
and Operations be amended to read $111,500." After some discussion, Mr. Morris offered to 
withdraw his motion. Moderator put question to meeting. Voted. Mr, Morris asked for re- 
consideration. Lost by a voice vote. Seven rose to doubt the vote. Standing: Yes - 46 
No - 100 Reconsideration lost. 

Fuel Heating 

Roof Repairs 

Capital Outlay 



98 



School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses $ 9,300.00 

Capital Outlay 7,300.00 

16,600.00 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 71,000.00 

Capital Outlay 11,765.00 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 872,816.00 

LIBRARY 

Board of Library Trustees 

Salaries, Director 14,174.00 

Salaries, Other 14,701.50 

(Finance Committee amendment: "I move that the sum of $71,115 be appropriated for the Library, 
Salaries, Other Account; $50,000 to be raised by transfer from the Revenue Sharing Account and 
$6,413.50 to be raised by transfer from State Aid to Public Libraries Account and the balance 
of $14,701.50 to be raised by taxation." So voted.) 

Expenses 9,450.00 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $59,450 be appropriated for Library 
Expenses; $50,000 to be raised by transfer from the Revenue Sharing Account and the balance 
of $9,450 to be raised by taxation." Voted as amended.) 

Capital Outlay 1,350.00 

TOTAL LIBRARY 39,675,50 

RECREATION 

Salaries, Director 13,094.00 

Other Salaries 64,783.00 

Expenses 32,595.00 

(Amendment by Mr. Francis Sferrazza: " I Move that the amount under Recreation Expenses be 
amended from $5,216 to $32,595 for the purposes of providing miscellaneous contractual 
services plus Recreation and Office Supplies; also to partially support the following 
Community Youth Programs: Wilmington Pop Warner Football, Wilmington Pony Le^igue, Wilmington 
Senior Little League, Wilmington Youth Hockey and Wilmington Figure Skating Club." Voted as 
amended. Main motion voted as amended.) 

TOTAL RECREATION 110,472.00 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Salaries 2,000.00 

Expenses 105.00 

Contractual Services 31,670.00 

TOTAL PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 33,775.00 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 1,500.00 

Expenses 1,400.00 

2,900.00 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

personal Services 1,000.00 

Expenses 3, 190.00 

TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION 4,190.00 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(Taken out of order - see first item of Budget.) 



99 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds $ ( 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $106,045 be appropriated for Insurance 
and Bonds, $106,045 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash with a balance of zero to be 
raised by taxation." So voted.) 

Reserve Fund 5,195.7! 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $50,000 be appropriated for the Reserve 
Fund; $44,097.60 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash, $706,65 land taking by the 
Commonwealth, and the balance of $5,195.75 to be raised by taxation." So voted.) 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield & Group Life 42,607.0( 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $86,000 be appropriated for Blue Cross, 
Blue Shield and Group Life; $43,393 to be raised by transfer from the Insurance Dividend 
Account and the balance of $42,607 to be raised by taxation." So voted.) 

Local Transportation 10,725.0( 

Town Report 3,000.0( 

Sewer Maintenance ( 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $1,000 be appropriated for Sewer 
Maintenance; $1,000 to be raised by transfer from Audit Account #946 and a balance of zero to 
be raised by taxation." So voted.) 

Council on Aging 11,150.0( 

Bicentennial Commission 7,000.0( 

By-law Study Committee ( 

Appraisals 10,000.0( 

Surplus Food Program 400. 0( 

Training & Conference - In State 6,205.0( 

Training & Conference - Out of State 4,165.0( 

Veterans' Retirement 16,500.0( 

Microfilming & Reader 3,500.0( 

Incentive Pay - Police 3,000.0( 

Incentive Pay - Fire 3,000.0( 

1974 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 208, 480. OC 

(Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the 1974 Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs Account 
be amended and that the sum of $208,480 be raised by taxation and appropriated for this 
purpose." Amendment so voted,) 

Public Buildings 11,575.0C 

Town Manager 14,000. OC 

(Voice vote. Chair in doubt. Standing: Yes - 136 No - 74 Moti'on carries,) 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 360,502.7! 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 574, 062. OC 

General Government C 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $90,325 be appropriated for Maturing Debt 
and Interest, General Government, $90,325 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash and a 
balance of zero to be raised from taxation." Amendment so voted.) 

Water C 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $87,138.50 be appropriated for Maturing 
Debt and Interest - Water; $87,138.50 to be rais<?d by transfer from Water Available Surplus 
and a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted.) 

Sewer 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $52,340 be appropriated for Maturing 
Debt and Interest - Sewer; $52,340 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash with a balance of 
zero to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted.) 

Interest on Anticipation & Authentication Fees 

(Finance Committee Amendment: "I move that the sum of $50,000 be appropriated for Interest 
on Anticipation and Authentication Fees; $49,163.97 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash 
and $836.03 to be raised by transfer from accrued Interest on Sale of Bonds Account and a 
balance of zero to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted.) 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST $ 574,062.00 



100 



TOTAL VOTED IN BUDGET BY TAXATION 



$9,851,862.25 



BY TRANSFERS 548,844,25 

Action on budget was finished at 6:30 p.m. Motion came at 6:30 p.m. to recess until 7:45 p.m. this evening 
in this Gymnasium. Motion so voted. 

Mr. Callan called the meeting to order at 8:00 p.m. there being a quorum present, 

ARTICLE 6. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
and appropriate for the purchase of the several following items of capital expenditure and further to 
authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of the several items listed below, and for the use of the several 
departments so designated: 

(All motions under Article #6 were made by Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager. "I move that the Town vote 
to raise by taxation and appropriate designated sums for the purchase of the several items of capital ex- 
penditure and to authorize the sale or turn-in of the several items so designated, each item to be voted 
separately." So voted.) 

a. Police Department 

To purchase five Police vehicles. (Finance Committee approved $20,000.) 

"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $20,000 for the purchase 

of five Police vehicles, and at the descretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of five 

vehicles presently used by the Police Department." Motion so voted. 

b. Fire Department 

To purchase a 1000 G.P.M. Pumper. 

"I move that we pass over Item 6b under Article 6 and take no action thereon. Voted to pass over this 
article. 

Civil Defense 

To purchase a Hydraulic Powered Rescue Tool, (Finance Committee approved $3,900,) 

"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,900 for the purchase of 
a Hydraulic Powered Rescue Tool for the use of the Civil Defense Department." Motion so voted. 

Building Inspector 
To purchase an automobile. 

"I move that we pass over item 6d under Article 6 and take no action thereon." Voted to pass over 
this article. 

Highway Department 

1. To purchase a 5 to 7 yard Dump Truck. (Finance Committee approved $10,000.) 

"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $10,000 for the purchase of 
5 to 7 yard Dump Truck for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager 
Authorize the sale or turn^in of a 3% ton Dump Truck presently used by the Highway Department," 
Motion so voted. 

2. To purchase a Truck Chassis and Cab only. (Finance Committee approved $8,000.) 
"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $8,000 for the purchase 
of a truck, chassis and cab for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the 
Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a 2\ ton truck presently used by the Highway Dept." 
Motion so voted. 

3. To purchase a Sweeper, 

"I move that we pass over Item 6e-3 under Article 6 and take no action thereon," Voted to pass over 
this article. 

4. To purchase a 3/4 ton Pickup Truck. (Finance Committee approved $3,000.) 

"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,000 for the purchase of 
a 3/4 ton Pickup Truck for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town 
Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a Pickup Truck presently used by the Highway Department." 
Motion so voted. 



101 



ARTICLE 6. (continued) 

5. To purchase a Sander Body, (Finance Connnittee approved $3,000.) 

"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,000 for the purchase 
of a Sander Body for the use of the Highway Department," Motion so voted, 

6. To purchase a Bobcat Snow Blower, 

"I move that we pass over Item e-6 under Article 6 and take no action thereon," Voted to pass over 
this article. 



f. Tree Department 

To purchase a Brush Chipper, (Finance Committee approved $5,500.) 

"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $5,500 for the purchase 
of a Brush Chipper for the use of the Tree Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager 
authorize the sale or turn-in of the Brush Chipper presently used by the Tree Department," Motion 
so voted. 



g. Cemetery Department 

1. To purchase a Tractor with front end loader and cab, (Finance Committee disapproved,) 
"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $6,500 for the purchase 
of a Tractor with front-end loader and cab for the use of the Cemetery Department," Motion so 
voted . 



2. To purchase a Cub Tractor with PTO and Hydraulic system, (Finance Committee disapproved,) 
"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,400 for the purchase 
of a Cub Tractor with PTO and hydraulic system for the use of the Cemetery Department, and at the 
discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a Mower presently used by the 
Cemetery Department." Motion so voted, 

h. Board of Health 

To purchase two Automobiles, 

"I move that we pass over Item h under Article 6 and take no action thereon," Voted to pass over 
this article. 



Public Buildings Department 

1, To purchase an Automobile. 

"I move that we pass over Item i-1 under Article 6 and take no action thereon," Voted to pass over 
this article. 

2. To purchase a Van Truck. 

"I move that we pass over item i-2 under Article 6 and take no action thereon," Voted to pass over 
this article. 

3. To purchase a Tractor with backhoe. 

"I move that we pass over item i-3 under Article 6 and take no action thereon," Voted to pass over 
this article. 

4, To purchase a three-quarter ton Pickup Truck 



(Finance Committee recommended $3,200.) 



"I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,200 for the purchase 
of a 3/4 ton Pickup Truck for the use of the Public Buildings Department, and at the discretion 
of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a 3/4 ton pickup Truck presently used by the 
Public Buildings Department." Motion so voted, 

5. To install Floodlights Boutwell School tennis courts. 

"I move that we pass over Item i-5 under Article 6 and take no action thereon." So voted. 

6. To install Floodlights, Woburn Street School tennis courts. 

"I move that we pass over Item i-6 under Article 6 and take no action thereon," So voted, 

7. To install Floodlights, Glen Road Schbol tennis courts. 

"I move that we pass over Item i-7 under Article 6 and take no action thereon. So voted, 

8. To install Floodlights, Wildwood Street School tennis courts, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

"I move that we pass over Item i-8 under Article 6 and take no action thereon." Voted to pass 
over this article. 



Total raised by taxation under Article 6 - $65,500. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge 



102 



ARTICLE 7. (continued) 

of said observances, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Michael A. Caira, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
the sum of $2,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a 
committee who shall arrange and have charge of said observances." Finance Committee approved $2,000. 
Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (or a total of 
$1,500.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars' Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Nee-Ellsworth Post #2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda, Chairman of the Selectmen: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation 
and appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (or a total of $1,500.00) for the purpose of renewing under authority 
of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Nee-Ellsworth Post #2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. , in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Wilmington Post #136 of the American Legion." 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Standing vote: Yes - 165 No - 60 Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept G. L. Chapter 32B, Section 7A, which reads: "Shall the 
Town, in addition to the payment of fifty per cent of a premium for contributory group life and health in- 
surance for employees in the service of the town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional rate" 
and raise by transfer from available funds or by taxation and appropriate a sum of money for this purpose; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Charles J. Dolan: "I move that the Town vote to accept G. L. Chapter 32B, Section 7A, which 
reads "Shall the Town, in addition to the payment of fifty per cent of a premium for contributory group life 
and health insurance for employees in the service of the town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary or 
additional rate" and that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $43,000 for this 
purpose." Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Standing vote taken: Yes - 145 No - 155 Motion lost. 

Reconsideration of Article 9 was called for. Standing: Yes - 114 No - 160 Lost. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of certain 
parcels of Town-owned land, as shown on the Wilmington Assessors' Map 105, to which reference is hereby made 
for a more particular description as follows: Lots 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16A, 17, 
18, 22, 26, 26A, 29, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 44, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 
63, 65, 66, 69, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 84, 85A, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 92, 97A, 99, 99A, 100 
101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 115, 116, 118, 120, and 121 to the Recreation 
Commission; or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Recreation Commission. 

Motion by Nancy C. DeWilde: "I move that the Town vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control 
of certain parcels of Town-owned land to the Recreation Commission as shown on the Wilmington Assessors' Map, 

i to which reference is hereby made for a more particular description as follows: Map 105, Lots: (here the 
numbered lots are exactly as laid out in the article, in the Warrant.) Finance Committee recommends dis- 

i approval. 

The Planning Board unanimously recommended the meeting vote on this Recreation motion. 

Amendment by Mr. Conrad J. Gerhartz: "I move to amend the motion to see if the Town will vote to transfer the 
i' care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of Town-owned land shown on the Wilmington Assessors 
ij Map 105 to which reference is hereby made; for a more particular description as follows: 



103 



ARTICLE 10. (continued) 

(Here the lot numbers agree with the Warrant Article #10) to the Conservation Commission for conservation pur 
poses to start creation of a green belt in the Town of Wilmington between Andover and Wilmington." Standing 
vote on Amendment: Yes - 95 No - 186 Amendment lost. Vote on main motion: Yes - 86 No - 214 Motion lost 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of and in 
compliance with the vote of the Special Town Meeting of June 25, 1973, making improvements to the water dis- 
tribution system in the northeast sector of the Town, and to authorize the Water Commissioners to make 
specific improvements therefor to include the right to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift 
for said purpose land as needed to carry out the purpose of this article and to determine how the appropria- 
tion shall be raised, whether by taxation, or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Vincent R. McLain, Water Commissioner: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$500,000 for the purpose of laying water mains of not less than 6 inches but less than 16 inches in diameter 
in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provision 
of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 42G to 421 inclusive for the purpose of making improvements to the water 
distribution system in the northeast sector of the Town as shown on a plan on file with the Superintendent of 
the Water Department, and to take by the right of eminent domain such land or easements as may be necessary t' 
effect the recommendations of the engineers in compliance with the vote of the Special Town Meeting of June 2 
1973, or to receive such land as a gift, and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow a sum or sums not to exceed in the aggregate $500,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 8, Clause 5 of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, and issue the bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor at one time, or from time to time, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than 
15 years from its date." Finance Committee recommended approval. Standing vote taken: Yes - 152 No - 38 
Motion carries, and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of and in 
compliance with the vote of the Special Town Meeting of June 25, 1973, making certain improvements to the 
water system to help alleviate the rusty water problem and to authorize the Water Commissioners to make 
specific improvements and to determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arnold C. Blake, Water Commissioner: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$2,000,000 for the purpose of, and in compliance with the vote of the Special Town Meeting of June 25, 1973, 
constructing and equipping a treatment plant to treat the Butters Row, Town Park and Chestnut Street wells on 
land previously acquired or to be acquired for Water Department purposes, and that the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow a sum or sums not to exceed in the aggregate 
$2,000,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause 4 of the General Laws as amended and supple- 
mented, and issue the bonds or notes of the Town therefor at one time, or from time to time, each issue of 
such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than 20 years from its date." Finance Committee recommended 
approval. After some discussion a standing vote was taken: Yes - 31 No - 172 Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 13. lo see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 8G of Chapter 40, MGL entitled 
"Agreements to Provide Mutual Police Aid Programs"; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Michael A. Caira: "I move that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 8G of Chapter 
40, M.G.L. entitled "Agreements to Provide Mutual Police Aid Programs". Finance Committee recommended approv. 
Motion so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000 for the Town's share of ; 
block grant from the Law Enforcement Assistance Act and in conjunction with the Northeastern Massachusetts Lai 
Enforcement Council for a region-wide radio communications network; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate thi 
sum of $5,000 for the Town's share of a block grant from the Law Enforcement Assistance Act and in conjunctioi 
with the Northeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council for a region-wide radio communications network." 
Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map by voting to rezone from 
Single Reaidence A District to Industrial District, the parcel of land described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the centerline of the B & M RR property and turning and running westerly along the 

10U 



I 



ARTICLE 15. (continued) 

the Wilmington -Woburn Town line to the northeasterly side of the Boston Edison Company property line, about 
275 feet; thence turning and running northeasterly along the westerly side of Woodlawn Avenue, about 535 feet; 
thence turning and running northerly along the westerly side of Cleveland Avenue, about 510 feet; thence 
turning and running easterly along the centerline of Cook Avenue and the centerline extended to the centerline 
of the B & M RR property; thence turning and running southerly along the B & M RR centerline to the Wilmington 
Wobum Town line and the point of beginning; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Rajrmond McNamara, "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map by voting 
to rezone from Single Residence A District to Industrial District, the parcel of land described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the centerline of the B & M RR property and turning and running westerly along the 
Wilmington-Woburn Town line to the northeasterly side of the Boston Edison Company property line, about 
275 feet; thence turning and running northeasterly along the westerly side of Woodlawn Avenue, about 535 feet; 
thence turning and running northerly along the westerly side of Cleveland Avenue, about 510 feet; thence 
turning and running easterly along the centerline of Cook Avenue and the centerline extended to the center- 
line of the B & M RR property; thence turning and running southerly along the B & M RR centerline to the 
Wilmington-Wobum Town line and the point of beginning." Planning Board recommended approval in the words of 
the motion. Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion was so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the 
Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from General Business District and Single Residential A District to 
Industrial District the following described parcel of land, to wit: 

Beginning on Concord Street, the land bounded on the north by Concord Street; on the west by Route 1-93; on 
the South by the Ipswich River; and on the east by North Reading Town line; or do anything in relation thereto 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the 
Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from General Business District and Single Residential A District to 
Industrial District the following described parcel of land, to wit: 

Beginning on Concord Street, the land bounded on the north by Concord Street; on the west by Route 1-93; on 
the South by the Ipswich River; and on the east by the North Reading Town line." Finance Committee recom- 
mended disapproval. Standing vote taken: Yes - 101 No - 73 Motion lost for lack of a 2/3 vote. Planning 
Board recommended approval in the words of the motion. 

At 10:45 p.m. a motion to adjourn by Mrs. McKie to adjourn to Saturday, March 16, 1974. Standing vote: 
Yes - 103 No - 118 Motion lost. 

Another motion by Mr. Miceli to adjourn to Monday night, March 11, 1974 at 7:00 p.m. at the High School 
Gymnasium. Standing vote: Yes - 118 No - 61 Motion so voted. Adjourned at 10:45 p.m. 

Number of voters checked in at the afternoon session - 631 
Number of voters checked in at the evening session - 367 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 11, 1974 

^r. John M. Callan, Town Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:20 p.m. there being a quorum present, 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
^Jilmington by adding to Chapter 5, Public Regulations, Section 12. Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages, as 
follows: 

(a) No person shall consume any alcoholic beverage while in or upon any street, public place, public 
building, or any place to which the public has right of access as invitees or licensees. 

(b) No person shall consume any alcoholic beverage while in or upon any private land, building, or 
place without consent of the owner or person in control thereof. 

(c) For the purpose of this by-law, alcoholic beverages are defined in Chapter 138, Section 1, of 
the General Laws. 

(d) Alcoholic beverages being consumed in violation of this by-law shall be seized and held by the 
Chief of Police until the case is disposed of by the courts, after which such beverages shall be 
returned to the person entitled to their lawful possession. 



105 



ARTICLE 17. (continued) 

(e) Whoever violates this by-law shall pay a fine not to exceed $10.00 for the first offense and not to 
exceed $25.00 for the second offense, and the fine shall be $50.00 thereafter, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Wilmington by adding to Chapter 5, Public Regulations, Section 12, Consumption of Alchoholic 
Beverages, as follows: 

(a) No person shall consume any alcoholic beverage while in or upon any street, public place, public 
building , 

(b) No person shall consume any alcoholic beverage while in or upon any private land, building, or 
place without consent of the owner or person in control thereof. 

(c) For the purpose of this by-law, alcoholic beverages are as defined in Chapter 138, Section 1, of i 
the General Laws. j 

(d) Alcoholic beverages being consumed in violation of this by-law shall be seized and held by the 
Chief of Police until the case is disposed of by the courts, after which such beverages shall be re- 
turned to the person entitled to their lawful possession. , 

(e) Whoever violates this by-law shall pay a fine of not to exceed $10.00 for the first offense and 
not to exceed $25,00 for the second offense; and the fine shall be $50.00 thereafter." Finance 
Committee had no recommendation. After some discussion a voice vote was taken and the Moderator de- 
clared that the ayes have it. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General . 
Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public 
Ways, and Specific Repairs Thereon) , which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein are hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation 
or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said ways and 
for payment of any damages resulting from the taking of the land and slope easements and other easements 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

(a) Industrial Way, from Woburn Street to West Street, a distance of 4,430 feet more or less. 

(b) Progress Way, from Industrial Way to a dead end, a distance of 630 feet more or less. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of 
the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the 
provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Dis- 
continuance of Public Ways, and Specific Repairs thereon), which layouts are filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk, and which, with plans therein are hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as 
may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to raise by taxation the sum of $700 and appropri- 
ate for the purpose of constructing said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of 
the land and slope easements and other easements therefor: 

(a) Industrial Way, from Wobum Street to West Street, a distance of 4,430 feet more or less. 

(b) Progress Way, from Industrial Way to a dead end, a distance of 630 feet More or less. 

The Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion voted by voice and was declared unanimous by the Moderator 
Planning Board recommended approval. i 

ARTICLE 19, To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Lexington Street northwesterl;' 
from Cunningham Street, then southwesterly a total distance of 714 feet more or less to Morningside Drive as 
recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 
80, as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments, which layout is filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize 
the Board of Seectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as 
may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of con- 
struction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements' 
and other easements, therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 



106 



ARTICLE 19. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of 
Lexington Street northwesterly from Cunningham Street, then southwesterly a total distance of 714 feet riore 
or less to Momingside Drive as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the 
provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments) which layout 
is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to for more 
particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, 
slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the Article, and that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $39,500 for the purpose of construction of said way and for the 
payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, $1,975 of 
said sum to be raised by taxation, and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is 
authorized to borrow a sum or sums in the amount of $37,525 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized 
by Chapter 44 of the General Laws." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board recommended approval. Vote taken by voice and de- 
clared unanimous by the Moderator. 

Reconsideration of Article 19 was called for. Motion was lost. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Momingside Drive from 
Lexington Street a distance of 693 feet more or less northwesterly to Fairfield Road, as recommended by the 
Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, 
relating to the Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which 
with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be neces- 
sary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of construction of 
said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
easements therefor, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Momingside 
Drive from Lexington Street a distance of 693 feet more or less northwesterly to Fairfield Road, as recom- 
mended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, 
as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, 
and which with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$32,300 for the purpose of construction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the 
taking of land and slope easements and other easements, $1,615 of said sum to be raised by taxation, and that 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums in the 
amount of $30,685 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the General Laws." 
Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board recommended approval. Vote taken by voice and de- 
clared unanimous by the Moderator, 

Reconsideration of Article 20 was called for. Motion was lost. 

jARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Winter Street from Main 
Street, a state highway, a distance of 850 feet more or less easterly to Beeching Avenue, as recommended by 
the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, 
relating to the Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which 
with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description: and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised whether by taxation 
or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of construction of said way 
land for payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Michael A. Caira: "I move that we pass over Article 21 and take no action thereon." So voted. 

"^TICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Beeching Avenue from Winter 
Street a distance of 180 feet more or less southeasterly to Marjorie Road as recommended by the Planning 
Joard and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, relating to 
jthe Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans 



107 



ARTICLE 22. (continued) 

therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effec 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing; or otherwise, for the purpose of construction of said way and 
for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that we pass over Article 22 and take no action thereon. So voted. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Falcon Road from Winter 
Street, a distance of 267 feet, more or less, northeasterly to a dead end as recommended by the Planning 
Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, relating 
to the Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take by right of Eminent Domain such slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or b 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of construction of said way and 
for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to accept as a Town Way, the layout of Falcon Road 
from Winter Street, a distance of 267 feet, more or less, northeasterly to a dead end as not recommended by 
the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as 
amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, 
and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as 
may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $14,500 for the purpose of construction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting 
from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, $725 of said sum to be raised by taxation, 
and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums 
in the amount of $13,775 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the General Laws 
Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board recommended disapproval. 

After much discussion the vote was called for. Standing: Yes - 7 No - 150 Motion lost for want of a 2/3 
vote. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Cleveland Avenue from Swain 
Road a distance of 340 feet, more or less., westerly to a dead end as recommended by the Planning Board and 
laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended, relating to the 
Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans 
therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effec 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of construction of said way and 
for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of 
Cleveland Avenue from Swain Road a distance of 340 feet, more or less, westerly to a dead end as not recom- 
mended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, 
as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, 
and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may 
be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and that the Tovni vote to raise and appropriate the sum o; 
$28,850 for the purpose of construction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the 
taking of land and slope easements and other easements, $1,445 of said sum to be raised by taxation, and that 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums in the 
amount of $27,405 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44, of the General Laws. 
The Finance Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board recommended disapproval. Standing vote taken; 
Yes - 61 No - 120 Motion lost for want of a 2/3 vote. 

Reconsideration of Article 24 was called for. A voice vote was taken and the Moderator ruled that the noes 
have it. 



108 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town Way, the layout of Scaltrito Drive a distance 
of 785 feet southerly from Salem Street to a dead end, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by 
the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Laying Out, Altera- 
tion, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon) , which layout is filed in 
the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular descrip- 
tion, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage 
or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appro- 
priation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or other- 
wise for the purpose of construction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking 
of land and slope easements and other easements, therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Scaltrito Drive a 
distance of 785 feet southerly from Salem Street to a dead end, as recommended by the Planning Board and 
laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Laying 
Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and specific repairs thereon), which layout is 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particu- 
lar description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope 
and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to raise the 
sum of $100 by taxation and appropriate for the purpose of construction of said way and for the piiyment of 
any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements." Finance Committee 
recommended approval. Planning Board recommended approval. Vote taken by voice and was declared unanimous 
by the Moderator, 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of relocat- 
ing a portion of Grove Avenue from its present location onto the right of way of the Grove Avenue layout and 
determine how the appropriation shall be raised whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$10,000 for the purpose of relocating a portion of Grove Avenue from its present location onto the right of 
way of the Grove Avenue layout. Finance Committee recommended approval. Vote taken by voice and was declared 
unanimous by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington under Section 
III-l-B-8 by adding after the words, "or swimming" the words, "horse show" to this section; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Wilmington under Section III-l-B-8 by adding after the words, "or swimming" the words "horse show" to this 
section." The Finance Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board recommended approval. Vote taken 
by voice and was declared unanimous by the Moderator, 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington under Section 
III-3-A-10 by adding after the words, "open-air business" the word, "carnivals" to this section, or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Michael A. Caira: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Wilmington under Section III-3-A-10 by adding after the words, "open-air business" the word "carnivals" to 
this section." Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board recommended approval. Vote taken by 
voice and was declared unanimous by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington under Section 
III-5-A-1 by deleting the words "or non-alcoholic beverages" in this section; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Mr, A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington 
under Section III-5-A-1 by deleting the words "or non-alcoholic beverages" in this section." Finance Committee 
recommended approval. Planning Board reported disapproval. 

Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr. moved to lay this motion on the table and take it up later in the meeting. Voted 
unanimously to lay motion on the table. 



109 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI- 1 of the Zoning By-Law by adding: 



D. Certain non-conforming buildings or structures may be altered or enlarged without appeal providing 
that such extension, alteration, or enlargement: 

1. Will cause no additional encroachment upon front yard, side yard, rear yard, or lot cover- 
age requirements of Section V-1, and 

2. Does not exceed fifty (50) percent of combined floor area devoted to such use at the time 
this by-law or any amendment thereto takes effect, and 

3. Received proper permit(s) from the Building Inspector, 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr, Arthur E, Harding, Jr, : "I move that the Town vote to amend Section VI-1 of the Zoning By-Law 
by adding: 

D, Certain non-conforming buildings or structures may be altered or enlarged without appeal providing 
that such extension, alteration, or enlargement: 

1. Will cause no additional encroachment upon front yard, side yard, rear yard, or lot coverage 
requirements or Section V-1, and 

2. Does not exceed fifty (50) percent of combined floor area devoted to such use at the time 
this by-law or any amendment thereto takes effect, and 

3. Received proper permit(s) from the Building Inspector." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board reported approval. Vote taken by voice and was de- 
clared unanimous by the Moderator, 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by revising 
Section I-2A: Section III-l; Section III-IA and III-lB; III-2A1; III-2B3; III-2B5; III-4B; IV-1 and V-1, 
by adding under the sections indicated, the following as underlined: 



Section I-2A 



Section V-1 



9. Single Residence - C District (SRC) 

Section III-l 
Section III-IA 
Section III-IB 
Section III-2A1 
Section III-2B3 
Section III-2B5 
Section III-4Ba 
Section IV-1 



After the words Single Residence-A. Single Residence-C. 



Under the column entitled: 



DISTRICT 



Add: 



Single Residence-C (SRC) 



Minimum Lot Area for Use 
Permitted without Appeal 
Minimum Lot Area for Use 

Permitted on Appeal 
Minimum Lot Frontage for Use 

Permitted Without Appeal 
Minimum Frontage for Use 

Permitted on Appeal 
Maximum Height 
Minimum Set-Back from 

Center Line of Street 
Minimum Front Yard Depth 
Minimum Width for each Side Yard 
Minimum Rear Yard Depth 
Minimum Lot Depth 
Minimum Lot Coverage 
for Buildings or Structures 



45.000 sq. ft. 
45,000 sq. ft. 

175 ft. 

200 ft. 

2'/2 stories or 38 ft. 

70 ft. 
45 ft. 
30 ft. 
25 ft. 
175 ft. 

25% 



or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr., reads as printed in Article 31, After some discussion the Moderator 
allowed arguments to be heard on Article 32 at the same time. Motion by Mr, Harding to pass over Article 31 
and take no action thereon. Voice vote taken and the Moderator declared that the ayes have it, 

ARTICLE 32. To amend the Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by adding the Single Residence C Districts as 
shown as "SRC" on a map on file with the Town Clerk entitled: "PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE ZONING DISTRICT 



110 



ARTICLE 32. (continued) 

MAP" by the Wilmington Planning Board, dated January 15, 1974; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr.: "I move indefinite postponement of Article 32." Voted by voice 
unanimously, 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend a portion of Section V-1 of the Zoning By-Law by striking 
out the requirements for Neighborhood Business under Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted on Appeal, Minimum 
Lot Frontage for use Permitted on Appeal, and Minimum Lot Depth, and by substituting the following: Minimum 
Lot Area for use Permitted on Appeal, 10,000 sq. ft.; Minimum Lot Frontage for use Permitted on Appeal, 150 
ft.; Minimum Lot Depth, 100 ft., or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to amend a portion of Section V-1 of the 
Zoning By-Law by striking out the requirements for Neighborhood Business under Minimum Lot Area for Use 
Permitted on Appeal, Minimum Lot Frontage for Use Permitted on Appeal, and Minimum Lot Depth, and by substi- 
tuting the following: 

Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted on Appeal, 10,000 sq. ft.; Minimum Lot Frontage for Use Permitted on 
Appeal 150 ft.; Minimum Lot Depth, 100 ft." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board recommended approval. Motion by a voice vote and 
the Moderator declared he was in doubt. A standing vote was taken: Yes - 148 No - 2 Motion carries. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington Section III-l- 
B-2, by adding after the word, "hospital" the words, "Ambulatory Care Center including related medical 
services"; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Wilmington Section III-l-B-2, by adding after the word, "hospital" the words, "Ambulatory Care Center includ- 
ing related medical services". Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board approved. Vote taken 
by voice and it was declared unanimous by the Moderator, 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter 3, Section 16 of the Revised By-Laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington by: 

a. Deleting the words in the first paragraph: "The Selectmen may sell after due notice", and sub- 
stituting the words; "The Selectmen may sell with such restrictions and subject to such ease- 
ments as may be recommended by the Planning Board, Conservation Commission, or other Town Agency 
after due notice." 

b. Deleting the words in the first paragraph "the best interest of the Town, lands held from" and 
substituting the words; "the best interest of the Town, lancfe, not shown on the Comprehansive 
General Plan as recommended for public use or restriction, held from" 

c. Adding a third paragraph: "Prior to publishing notice, the Selectmen shall notify and consult 
with all Town Agencies. Reports shall be submitted to the Selectmen within thirty (30) days of 
the Selectmen's determination to advertise. Said reports shall set forth, insofar as practi- 
cable, the probable effect of such conveyance, and may contain suggestions or recommendations 
relative to such conveyance. Absence of said report by any Agency shall be deemed as having 

no effect." 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr. was read as in the words of the above Article #35. The Finance 
Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board recommended approval. After some discussion a voice 
vote was taken. Motion was lost for want of a majority declared the Moderator, 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 

by adding a new section to Chapter 3; namely, Section 25 as follows: 

"The Selectmen shall appoint a Board of Appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, Section 81Z of the 
General Laws for the purpose of hearing and acting upon appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, 
Section BlE through 81H, inclusive. Official Map, and 81K through 8lGg, inclusive. Subdivision Control 
Law; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 



111 



ARTICLE 36. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr. substantially as outlined in Article 36. Finance Committee recommended 
approval. Planning Board recommended approval. 

After some discussion the Moderator put the motion before the meeting by voice. Mr. Callan declared the noes* 
have it. Motion lost. Seven voters rose to doubt the vote. Standing: Yes - 28 No - 151 Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of the following described 
street as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public 
Ways, and Specific Repairs Thereon), which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said 
way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of the land and slope easements and other 
easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Glen Road, from Main Street to Hamden Street, a distance of 1130 feet, more or less, (in compliance 
with the Petition of Patricia Toto, et al). 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that we pass over Article 37 and take no action thereon." So voted. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying 
a water main in Aldrich Road for a certain distance as shown on a plan on file with the Superintendent of the 
Water Department, of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Sections 42G to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that we pass over Article 38 and take no action thereon. So voted. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying 
a water main in Brattle Street for a certain distance as shown on a plan on file with the Superintendent of 
the Water Department, of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter in accordance with 
the recommendations of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws 
Chapter 40, Sections 42G to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Vincent R. McLain, Water Commissioner: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$5,695 for the purpose of laying water mains of not less than 6 inches but less than 16 inches in Brattle 
Street for a certain distance as shown on a plan on file with the Superintendent of the Water Department, in 
accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 40, Sections 42G to 421 inclusive and that the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow a sum or sums not to exceed in the aggregate $5,695 under and pur- 
surant to Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause 5 of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, and to issue the 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor, at one time, or from time to time, each issue of such bonds or notes to 
be payable in not more than 15 years from its date." Finance Committee recommended approval. 

A voice vote was taken and the Moderator declared the motion voted unanimously. ^\ 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying a 
water main in Jaquith Road for a certain distance as shown on a plan on file with the Superintendent of the 
Water Department, of not less than six inches but less than 16 inches in diameter in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Sections 42G to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arnold C. Blake: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $6,245 for the purpose of 
laying water mains of not less than 6 inches but less than 16 inches in Jaquith Road for a certain distance 
as shown on a plan on file with the Superintendent of the Water Department, in accordance with the recom- 
mendations of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
40, Sections 42G to 421 inclusive and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is hereby 

112 



r 



ARTICLE 40. (continued) 

authorized to borrow a sum or sums not to exceed in the aggregate $6,245 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 8, Clause 5 of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, and to issue the bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, at one time, or from time to time, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more 
than 15 years from its date." Finance Committee recommended approval, 

A voice vote was taken and the Moderator declared the motion voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, by taxation or from avail- 
able funds, to be used to compensate employees upon their retirement for unused sick leave they have accumu- 
lated. To be compensated at the rate of $20.00 per day with a maximum of 100 days; or do anything in rela- 
tion thereto. Petition of Charles J. Dolan. 

Motion by Mr. Charles J. Dolan: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$6,000 to be used to compensate employees upon their retirement for unused sick leave they have accumulated; 
to be compensated at the rate of $20.00 per day with a maximum of 100 days." Finance Committee recommended 
disapproval. Motion so voted by voice and declared by the Moderator voted. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to John Clark a 
certain parcel of town-owned land as Parcel lOlC on Assessors' Map 50, containing about 2,692 feet, subject 
to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount to be 
paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of John Clark. 

Motion by Mr. John C. Clark: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to 
John Clark a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel lOlC on Assessors' Map 50, containing about 
2,692 feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further to set the 
minimum amount at $1,000 to be paid for such conveyance," Finance Committee recommended approval of sale at 
fair market value. Motion so voted to allow this sale. 

ARTICLE 43, To see if the Town will vote to amend the present Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington, as amended, by changing the zoning classification of the following described parcel of land owned 
by George W, Cochrane 3rd on the easterly side of West Street on the Wilmington-Reading line which lies in a 
two hundred foot wide buffer zone zoned Single Residence A (SRA) adjoining an Industrial District to that of 
"Industrial District" (Ind) namely: 

A certain parcel of land on the Easterly side of West Street bounded and described as follows: 
Westerly by West Street, 220 feet, more or less; Northerly by remaintnj; industrially zoned 
land of George W. Cochrane , 3rd 210 feet, more or less; Westerly again, by said Cochrane land, 
140 feet, more or less; Northerly by land now or formerly of Clough and Fisher, 205 feet; 
Easterly along the Wilmington -Reading line, 320 feet, more or less; and Southerly along the 
Wilmington-Reading line, 359 feet, more or less; 
or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of George A. Anderson. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur E, Harding, Jr,: "I move that the present zoning by-law and zoning map of the Town of 
Wilmington, as amended, be further amended by changing the zoning classification of the following described 
parcel of land owned by George W. Cochrane, III on the Easterly side of West Street on the Wilmington-Reading 
line which lies in a two hundred foot wide buffer zone zoned Single Residence A (SRA) adjoining an Indus- 
trial District to that of "Industrial District" (IND), namely: 

A certain parcel of land on the Easterly side of West Street bounded and described as follows: 

Westerly by West Street, 220 feet, more or less; Northerly by remaining industrially zoned land 
of George W, Cochrane, III, 210 feet, more or less; Westerly again, by said Cochrane land, 
140 feet, more or less; Northerly by land now or formerly of Clough and Fisher, 205 feet; 
Easterly along the Wilmington-Reading line, 320 feet, more or less; and Southerly along the 
Wilmington-Reading line, 359 feet, more or less," 
Finance Committee changed their decision to approval. Planning Board reported approval. Vote taken by voice 
and it was declared unanimous by the Moderator, 

ARTICLE 44, To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map by rezonxng the follow- 
ing described parcel of land from Rural to Industrial: 

Beginning at the southwesterly corner thereof on Andover Street, formerly Woburn Street, at a stake and 
stones about six hundred eighty -one (681) feet Northerly jErom the Southwest corner of land formerly con- 
veyed to John A, Jackson, thence running Easterly by said land conveyed to said Jackson, about one 
thousand one hundred forty-three (1,143) feet to a brook, thence running Northwesterly by said brook 



113 



ARTICLE 44. (continued) 

and land of said Jackson to land formerly of David Cuiranings and later of Charles Wakefield and more. 

recently of Edward B. Eames; thence running Westerly by said last named land, about three hundred 

seventy (370) feet, to Andover Street, and thence running Southerly by said street about four 

hundred eighty-two (482) feet to point of beginning. 

Containing 10 acres of land, more or less, however otherwise said premises may be bounded, 
measured or described; or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Henri P. Chinn. 

Motion read by Mr. James Banda, Mr, Callan allowed a laviyer to speak on the motion, Mr. Callan asked if 
the motion follows exactly that of the article and the answer was yes. Finance Committee recommended disap- 
proval. Planning Board recommended disapproval. Vote taken by voice and the Moderator declared motion 
lost unanimously. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business, the following described premises: 
The land in Wilmington, triangular in shape, situated in the northerly side of Lowell Street and 
bounded as follows: Northwesterly by Lowell Street Park, Southerly by Lowell Street; Easterly by 
Route 93. Petition of Wilbur F. Thomas. 

Motion by Mr. Wilbur F. Thomas: "I move to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington, 
by voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business, the following described premises: 
The land in Wilmington, triangular in shape, situated in the northerly side of Lowell Street and 
bounded as follows: Northwesterly by Lowell Street Park, Southerly by Lowell Street, Easterly by 
Route 93." 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Planning Board reported approval. Standing vote taken: 
Yes - 138 No - 26 Motion carries. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to Industrial District, the following described premises: 
The land in Wilmington situated in the southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: Northerly 
by Lowell Street, Westerly by West Street; Southerly by the Industrial District; Easterly by Route 93. 
Petition of Wilbur F. Thomas. 

Motion by Mr. Wilbur F. Thomas read as laid out in the above Article 46. After some discussion, Mr. Thomas 
amended his motion. Amendment: "I move to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington, by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business, the following described premises: 
The land in Wilmington situated in the southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: Northerly 
by Lowell Street, Westerly by West Street, Southerly by the Industrial District, Easterly by Route 93." 
Finance Committee recommended disapproval. The Planning Board disapproved the main motion but approved the 
amendment to General Business. Vote on the amendment by standing: Yes - 143 No - 67 Motion carries. 
Vote on the main motion as amended: Yes - 145 No - 76 Motion fails for want of a 2/3 vote. 

After action was completed on Article 46, Mr. Harding moved to take Article 29 off the table. So voted. 
Voted on Article 29 by standing: Yes - 16 No - 74 Motion lost for want of a 2/3 vote. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of the following described 
street, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Layout, Alteration, Relocation and discontinuance of Public Ways, 
and Specific Repairs thereon) which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plan 
therein is hereby referred to for more particular description and to authorize the Board of Selectmen, to 
take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said 
way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land slope easements and other easements, 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

a. A new way, known as Wobum Street By-Pass from Wobum Street opposite the intersection of Eames 
Street, easterly and then northerly a distance of 3,000 feet, more or less, to Lowell Street. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr. : "I move that we pass over Article 47 and take no action thereon. The 
Moderator declared that the ayes have it to take no action on this article. 



11U 



Motion came to adjourn at 11:45 p.m. The Moderator declared that there being no further business, all 
Articles in the Warrant disposed of, the meeting was adjourned. Adjourned at 11:45 p.m. 

Number of voters checked in at this meeting (329). 



Total voted by Taxation $9,946,252.25 
Total voted by Transfers 548,844.25 
Total voted by Bond Issue 580,150.00 



ATTEST: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - AUGUST 26, 1974 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



Mr. John M. Callan, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 8:04 p.m. there being a quorum present. 

The Warrant for this Town Meeting was properly posted on August 8, 1974 by A. John Imbimbo, Constable of 
Wilmington. 

TO: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts. 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert Barrows Auditorium, Church Street, Wilmington, the twenty-sixth 
day of August at eight o'clock p.m. to consider and act on the following Articles: 

After reading so much of the Warrant, above, Mr, James R. Miceli, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen,- in- 
terrupted to make a motion: "Mr, Moderator, I move that we dispense with further reading of the Warrant and 
take up each Article by number." The Moderator declared the Ayes have it - so voted. 

ARTICLE 1. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for the purpose of Salary 
Adjustments and Additional Cost for Town employees, other than school employees, for the 1974-1975 fiscal 
year beginning July 1, 1974, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $45,000.00 for 
the Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs Account, for the purpose of paying salary adjustments and addi- 
tional costs for Town employees, other than school employees, for the 1974-1975 fiscal year beginning July 1, 
1974, with said sum to be transferred from the "Free Cash" account for this purpose." Motion put to a vote 
and the Moderator declared the ayes have it - so voted, unanimously. (Finance Committee recommended 
approval of $45,000.00.) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, by taxation or transfer 
from available funds or otherwise, to be used to compensate employees upon their retirement for unused sick 
leave they have accumulated. To be compensated at the rate of $20.00 per day with a maximum of 100 days; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $8,000.00 to be used to compensate employees upon their retirement for unused sick leave they have 
accumulated; to be compensated at the rate of $20.00 per day with a maximum of 100 days; with said sum to 
be transferred from the "Free Cash" account for this purpose." The Finance Committee recommended approval 
of $8,000.00. Motion put to a vote and the Moderator declared the Ayes have it - so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for the purpose of purchasing 
a compressor, purifier and tanks for fire and water rescue operations for the Fire Department, and determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything 
in relation thereto. 



115 



ARTICLE 3. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr., Selectmen: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $4,500.00 for the purpose of purchasing a compressor, purifier and tanks for fire and water rescue 
operations for the Fire Department, with said sum to be transferred from the "Free Cash" account for this 
purpose." The Finance Committee recommended approval of $4,500.00. Motion put to a vote and the Moderator 
declared the Ayes have it - so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 4. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate for the purpose of funding 
the new legal holiday known as the Martin Luther King Day and determine how the same shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,900.00 
for the purpose of funding the new legal holiday known as the Martin Luther King Day, with said sum to be 
transferred from the "Free Cash" account for this purpose." The Finance Committee recommended approval of 
$3,900.00. Voice vote taken, chair in doubt. Vote taken by standing: Yes - 150 No - 58 Motion carries 
and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate to comply with Rule 2B of the 
Office of the State Fire Marshall concerning the equipment of science laboratories with emergency deluge 
showers in certain classrooms in specific school buildings, and determine how the same shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Upon a motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris it was voted to pass over Article 5 and take no action thereon. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept an amendment to the Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational/ 
Technical School District Agreement initiated by vote of the Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational/Technical 
School District Committee adopted on May 28, 1974 and entitled "Amendment No, 3 to Shawsheen Valley 
Regional Vocational /Technical School District Agreement',' which Amendment provides that the annual organiza- 
tion meeting of said Committee for the purpose of electing a chairman and vice-chairman shall be held in 
each year at the first regular meeting of the Committee following the latest date at which the annual town 
election of any member town is held, instead of April 1 of each year as said Agreement now provides. 

Motion by Mr. Michael A. Caira, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to accept an amendment to the Shawshee 
Valley Regional Vocational/Technical School District Agreement initiated by vote of the Shawsheen Valley 
Regional Vocational/Technical School District Committee adopted on May 28, 1974 and entitled "Amendment No. 
to Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational/Technical School District Agreement", which Amendment provides that 
the annual organization meeting of said Committee for the purpose of electing a chairman and vice-chairman 
shall be held in each year at the first regular meeting of the Committee following the latest date on which 
the annual town election of any member town is held, instead of April 1 of each year as said Agreement now 
provides." The Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 

Motion put to a vote and the Moderator declared the Ayes have it - so voted, ^ 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington 
by voting to rezone from Rural (R) District to Industrial District (Ind) the following described land, to 
wit; Being that land in Wilmington shown on a plan entitled "Rezoning Plan, Wilmington, Mass," dated: 
7/26/74, scale: 1 in, = 300 ft,, and prepared by K, J, Miller Company, Inc., Civil Engineers and Land 
Surveyors, 106 West Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts, a copy of which plan is filed with the office of the 
Town Clerk, meaning and intending, as shown on said plan, to rezone from Rural (R) District to Industrial 
District (IND) land shown as the following lots on said plan designated as Lots 1-A, 20-B, 26, 27, 28, 30, \ 
31, 31A, 32, 32A, 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49 and a portion of Lot 28A, which lots 
are also shown on Assessors Map R-3, with the identical numerical designation, namely: Lots lA, 26, 27, 28, 
30, 31, 31A, 32, 32A, 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48 and 49 and Lot 20B on Assessors Map R-1 
and a portion of Lot 28A on Assessors Map R-2" said land being bounded and described in accordance with said 
plan as follows: 

Beginning at the intersection of the Westerly side-line of Ballardvale Street and the extension of an 
Industrial Zone line now existing and bounded as follows: Westerly by the Westerly side-line of 
Ballardvale Street 3620 feet, more or less; Northerly by land now or formerly of Robert and ' 
Margaret T. demons and Robbins Realty Trust, Donald P. Robbins, Trustee, 1901 feet, more or less; ' 
Easterly by land now or formerly of Joseph Sciarappa, John E. and Pauline H. Dick, Albert G. Fiorenza, 
John T. Spinelli and owners unknown 3877 feet, more or less; and Southerly by the existing Industrial 
Zone line 2700 feet, more or less to the point of beginning; 

116 



ARTICLE 7. (continued) 

or do anything in relation thereto. Petition of Rocco V. DePasquale. 

Motion by Mr. Joseph F. Courtney: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the 
Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Rural (R) District to Industrial District (IND) the following 
described land, to wit: 

At this point in the reading of the motion, Mr, Callan interrupted Mr. Courtney to ask if the description in 
his motion follows that exactly in the Warrant for this meeting under Article 7, Mr. Courtney's answer was 
yes, exactly. The Moderator said he ruled that he would dispense with further reading of the motion. 
The Planning Board recommended disapproval of this motion. There followed a great deal of discussion. 

Amendment by Mr. James Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the 
Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Rural (R) District to Industrial District (IND) the following 
described land, to wit: 

Being that land in Wilmington shown on a plan entitled "Rezoning Plan, Wilmington, Mass." dated 
7/26/74. Scale: 1 in. = 300 ft., and prepared by K. J. Miller Co., Inc., Civil Engineers & 
Land Surveyors, 106 West Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts, a copy of which plan is filed with 
the office of the Town Clerk, meaning and intending as shown on said plan, to rezone from RURAL 
DISTRICT (R) TO INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT (IND) land as shown the following lots on said plan desig- 
nated as Lots 48 and 49, which Lots are also shown on Assessors' Map R-3, with the identical 
numerical designation, namely: Lots 48 and 49; said land being bounded and described substantially 
in accordance with said plan as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the Westerly side-line 
of Ballardvale Street and the Southerly side-line of the land now or formerly of Robert and 
Margaret T. demons and bounded as follows: Northerly by land now or formerly of Robert and 
Margaret T. demons and Robbins Realty Trust, Donald P. Robbins, Trustee, 1901 feet, more or 
less; Easterly by land now or formerly of John E. and Pauline H. Dick, 434 feet, more or less; 
Southerly by land now or formerly of Lena Catanese, 1911 feet, more or less; and, Westerly by 
the Westerly side-line of Ballardvale Street, 321 feet, more or less to the point of beginning." 

The Planning Board recommended approval of this Amendment. The Finance Committee approved the original motion 
but did not support the amendment. Mr, Callan asked for the approximate size of each article. Mr. Courtney 
said his motion was estimated at 170 acres. Mr, Miceli said his motion was estimated at 17 acres. 
Mr. Courtney showed the Town Meeting a map with an overlay of this area, Mr. Mercier asked the Moderator to 
allow an attorney from another town who represented some of the owners of a part of this land to speak to the 
meeting. This was allowed. After a great deal of further discussion on the amendment, Mr. Miceli summed 
up his amendment and urged the meeting to support his amendment. The Moderator said the time was up for 
further discussion unless he heard a motion to extend the time to allow further debate. Mr, Belbin moved to 
extend the time for discussion to another 15 minutes. Standing vote taken: Yes - 120 No - 138 Motion 
lost for want of a 2/3 vote. 

The Moderator put the Amendment to a voice vote. The Moderator declared the Ayes have it and the amendment 
was so voted, Mr. Courtney doubted the vote and seven voters rose to question said voice vote. Standing 
vote taken: Yes - 197 No - 108 Motion carries because it had a majority vote. Action Main Motion as 
amended - More discussion followed. 

Vote on Main Motion as Amended: Standing vote: Yes - 311 No - 10 Motion carries and so declared by the 
Moderator. 

There being no further business before this meeting a motion to adjourn came at 9:25 p,m. Meeting adjourned. 
Number of voters checked in at this meeting - 389. 



ATTEST: (Mrs,) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



117 



STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM. CHURCH STREET - September 10. 1974 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Gymnasium, Church Street 
Tuesday, the tenth day of September 1974 at ten o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
following offices: 



Governor 


For 


this Commonwealth 


Lieutenant Governor 


For 


this Commonwealth 


Attorney General 


For 


this Commonwealth 


Secretary of the Commonwealth 


For 


this Commonwealth 


Treasurer and Receiver-General 


For 


this Commonwealth 


Auditor 


For 


this Commonwealth 


Representative in Congress 


For 


the Fifth Congressional District 


One Councillor 


For 


the Third Councillor District 


One Senator 


For 


the Fifth Senatorial District 


Representative in General Court 


For 


the 36th Representative District 


One District Attorney 


For 


the Northern District 


One County Commissioner 


For 


Middlesex County 


One Sheriff 


For 


Middlesex County 



The Polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return -'f this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said meet- 
ing. 

Given under our hands this 26th day of August A.D. 1974. 



s/ James R. Miceli, Chairman 
s/ James F. Banda 
s/George W. Boylen, Jr. 



s/Michael A. Caira) Selectmen of the Town of 
s/A. Daniel Gillis) Wilmington 
) 



At 9:45 a.m. the Town Clerk read the Warrant. The zero sheets were removed from the twenty-five machines and 
placed outside the railing so that the candidates could look at them before the polls opened. All the 
election officers were ready with their voting lists and voting machines at five minutes of 10:00 a.m. The 
Town Clerk declared the Polls open at 10:00 a.m. We had no problems throughout the day, and everyone and 
everything worked perfectly. 

All the totals from the 25 voting machines plus two (2) absentee balLots were recorded and declaration 
thereof made, as by law is directed, and were for the following, namely: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Governor 

Michael S. Dukakis 
Robert H. Quinn 
Blanks 



879 
455 

30 

1364 



Governor 

Francis W. Sargent 
Carroll P. Sheehan 
Blanks 



196 
129 

1 

326 



Lientenant Governor 
Eva B. Hester 
Christopher A. lannella 
John Pierce Lynch 
Thomas P. O'Neill, III 
Thomas Martin Sullivan 
Blanks 



186 
298 
84 
507 
163 
126 
1364 



Lieutenant Governor 
Donald R. Dwight 
Blanks 



264 
62 
326 



118 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Attorney General 

Francis X. Bellotti 
Barry T. Hannon 
Edward F. Harrington 
Edward M. O'Brien 
S. Lester Ralph 
George L. Sacco 
Blanks 



324 
17 

127 
34 
336 
508 

18 

1364 



Attorney General 

Charles C. Cabot, Jr. 
William I. Cowin 
Josiah A. Spaulding 
Blanks 



85 
80 

130 
31 

326 



Secretary 

John F. X. Davoren 
Paul H. Guzzi 
Blanks 



471 
783 
110 
1364 



Secretary 

John M. Quinlan 
Blanks 



246 
80 
326 



Treasurer 

Robert Q. Crane 
Charles Mark Furcolo 
Blanks 



647 
609 
108 
1364 



Treasurer 

(No Candidate) 

Blanks 

Others 



325 

1 

326 



Auditor 

Thaddeus Buczko 
Blanks 



C ongressman - Fifth District 
William C. Madden 
Paul E. Tsongas 
Blanks 



999 
365 
1364 



221 
1042 

101 
1364 



Auditor 

(No Candidate) 

Blanks 

Others 

Congressman - Fifth District 



Paul W. 
Blanks 



Cronin 



325 

1 

326 

286 
40 
326 



Councillor - Third District 



Herbert L. 
Blanks 



Connolly 



Senator - Fifth District 
(No Candidate) 
Others 
Blanks 



843 
521 
1364 



1 

1363 
1364 



Councillor - Third District 
(No Candidate) 
Blanks 
Others 



Senator - Fifth District 



Ronald C. 

Blanks 

Others 



MacKenzie 



325 

1 

326 

285 
40 

1 

326 



Representative in General Court - 
Thirty-sixth Middlesex District 
Fred F. Cain 
Blanks 
Others 



1053 
310 

1 

1364 



Representative in General Court - 
Thirty-sixth Middlesex District 
(No Candidate) 
B 1 ank s 
Others 



325 

1 

326 



District Attorney 
John J. Droney 
Blanks 



Northern District 



849 
515 
1364 



District Attorney - Northern District 
(No Candidate) 
Blanks 



326 
326 



119 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



County Commissioners - Middlesex County 
John L. Danehy 
William J. Clements 
Charles I. Clough, Jr. 
Pasquale R. Coppola 
Edward A. Doherty 
Thomas E. McManus 
Blanks 



361 
304 
125 
121 
161 
56 
236 
1364 



County Commissioners - Middlesex County 
(No Candidate) 
Blanks 



326 
326 



Sheriff - Middlesex County 
Walter J. Sullivan 
B 1 ank s 



1056 
308 
1364 



Sheriff - Middlesex County 
John J. Buckley 
Blanks 



263 
63 



326 



The Town Clerk read the vote totals to the public at 9:45 p.m. and the election then and there were 
ad j ourned . 



Attest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



STATE ELECTION - Wilmington, Massachusetts 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - November 5, 1974 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote, 
to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the Fifth day of November next at 5:45 o'clock 
^'n the forenoon, the polls to be open at 6:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the election of the 
following: Governor and Lieutenant Governor; Attorney General; Secretary; Treasurer; Auditor; Congressman; 
Councillor; Senator; Representative in General Court; District Attorney; Northern District; County 
Commissioner; County Sheriff; and vote YES or NO on the following questions: 

QUESTION #1 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held August 25, 1971, received 212 vote 
in the affirmative and 39 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held June 5, 1973, 
received 235 votes in the affirmative and 19 in the negative? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment, if approved, would replace the present Article 52 of the Articles of 
Amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth and would empower the General Court, by concurrent vote of 
the two houses, to take a recess or recesses amounting to not more than thirty days. The present Article 52 
permits such recesses but provides that "no such recess shall extend beyond the sixtieth day" from the be- 
ginning of the legislative session. 



QUESTION #2 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below: which was 
approved by ):he General Court in a joint session of the two branches held August 25, 1971, received 177 votes 
in the affirmative and 65 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held June 6, 1973, re- 
ceived 166 votes in the affirmative and 93 in the negative? 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



2527 
1314 
1136 
4977 



120 



STATE ELECTION (Continued) 



Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment, if approved, would provide for a census in the year 1975 and every 
tenth year thereafter of the inhabitants of each city and town on a basis for determining the representative, 
senatorial and councillor districts for the ten year period beginning vrith the first Wednesday in the fourth 
January following the taking of the census, provided that the districts as established based on the 1971 
census shall terminate on the first Wednesday in January 1979. The census shall specify the number of in- 
habitants residing in each precinct of a town and each precinct and ward of a city. 

Under the proposed amendment, the House of Representatives would consist of 160 members, in contrast to the 
present membership of 240, and the Senate of 40 members. The General Court would at its first regular 
session after the year in which the census is taken divide the Commonwealth into 160 representative districts 
and 40 senatorial districts of contiguous territory so that each representative and each senator will repre- 
sent an equal number of inhabitants as nearly as may be and such districts shall be formed, as nearly as may 
be, without uniting two counties or parts of two or more counties and, with respect to representative dis- 
tricts, without uniting as nearly as may be, two towns or parts of two or more towns, two cities or parts of 
two or more cities, or a city and a town, or parts of cities and towns, into one district, and without divid- 
ing any town containing less than 2500 inhabitants. The General Court would be permitted to pass laws to 
limit the time within which judicial proceedings may be instituted calling in question any such division. 

The proposed amendment further provides that every representative, for one year at least immediately preceding 
his election, shall have been an inhabitant of the district for which he is chosen, and every senator shall 
be an inhabitant of this Commonwealth for five years at least preceding his election and at the time of his 
election shall be an inhabitant of the district for which he is chosen. Every representative and senator 
shall cease to represent his district when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the Commonwealth, The 
manner of calling and conducting the elections for representatives and for senators and councillors, and of 
ascertaining their election, shall be prescribed by law. The amendment vests original jurisdiction in the 
Supreme Judicial Court, upon petition of any voter of the Commonwealth, filed with the clerk of said court, 
for judicial relief relative to the establishment of House of Representatives, councillor and senatorial 
districts . 



Yes 

No 

Blanks 



2845 
896 
1236 
4977 



I QUESTION #3 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held June 7, 1972, received 250 votes in 
the affirmative and 3 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held June 5, 1973, received 
f253 votes in the affirmative and in the negative? 

L 

! Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would repeal section 2 of Article 46 of the Articles of Amendment to 
the Constitution of the Commonwealth (the "anti-aid amendment", so-called), and replace it with a new section 
2, for the purpose of allowing grants in aid to private higher educational institutions or to students, or 
parents or guardians of students, attending such institutions. 

The proposed amendment would delete the first clause of the present section 2, which requires that all moneys 
raised by taxation in the towns and cities for the support of public schools, and all moneys appropriated by 
the Commonwealth for the support of common schools shall be applied to or expended in only those schools con- 
ducted according to law under the order and superintendence of the authorities of the town or city in which 
the money is expended. The effect of the deletion of the first clause of section 2 would be to remove the 
constitutional prohibition against the use of public moneys, which have been raised by taxation or appropria- 
ted for support of public schools, for grants in aid to private higher educational institutions or to 
students, or parents or guardians of students, attending such institutions. 



The proposed amendment would also alter the second clause of the present section 2 by removing the prohibi- 
tion against a grant, appropriation or use of public money or property or loan of public credit by the 
Commonwealth or any political subdivision for the purpose of founding, maintaining or aiding any school or 
institution of learning, whether under public control or otherwise, wherein any denominational doctrine is 



121 



STATE ELECTION (continued) 



inculcated, or any other school or any college which is not publicly owned and under the exclusive control, 
order and superintendence of public officers or public agents. In place of the foregoing, the proposed 
amendment would prohibit the grant, appropriation or use of public money or property, or loan of credit by 
the Commonwealth or any political subdivision for the purpose of founding, maintaining or aiding any primary 
or secondary school which is not publicly owned and under the exclusive control, order and superintendence of 
public officers or public agents. 

The proposed amendment would also add to the present section 2 a provision that nothing therein shall be con- 
strued to prohibit grants in aid to private higher educational institutions or to students, or parents or 
guardians of students attending such institutions. 



Yes 1901 
No 1821 

Blanks 1255 

4977 

QUESTION #4 - Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was approved by the 
General Court in a joint session of the two branches held May 17, 1972, received 131 votes in the affirmative 
and 121 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held May 8, 1974, received 139 votes in 
the affirmative and 119 in the negative? 



The proposed constitutional amendment would revise Article 78 of the Articles of Amendment to the Constitu- 
tion to permit the expenditure of money from the highway fund for mass transportation lines and other mass 
transportation purposes in such manner as the Legislature may direct, the highway fund includes receipts 
from fees, duties, excises and license taxes relating to registration, operation or use of motor vehicles and 
taxes from the sale of motor vehicle fuels. The expenditure of money from such fund is presently restricted 
to highway and bridge construction, reconstruction, maintenance and repair, enforcement of state traffic laws, 
and administration of the tax statutes which provide highway fund receipts. 



Yes 1976 
No 1793 
Blanks 1208 

4977 

QUESTION #5 - Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below which was disapproved in the House of Representatives by 
a vote of 73 in the affirmative and 150 in the negative and was disapproved in the Senate by a vote of 16 in 
the affirmative and 22 in the negative? 



Summary 

Provisions of the act establish an independent Corrupt Practices Commission, with five members to be appointed 
by the Governor to staggered five-year terms. The Commission has subpoena powers and is to investigate, by 
means of secret hearings, candidates' compliance with all state and federal laws relating to political cam- 
paign contributions and expenditures and corrupt practices. If probable cause is shown, the Commission is 
required to direct the Attorney General to take further action in the proper form and is required to make 
public a report of such action. In cases involving the campaign practices of the Attorney General himself, 
a special attorney is to be appointed. If no probable cause is shown, the Commission is to state so publicly. 



Further, the proposed act extends the application of the current statute regarding the disclosure of campaign 
expenditures and contributions, to all candidates for office above the town and city level, with the excep- 
tion of President and Vice President of the United States, The act requires all such candidates to receive 
and disburse all amounts greater than $25 by check, and makes it a crime to knowingly receive cash payment 
from a candidate or his committee for a service costing more than $25. The act also requires candidates to 
designate a single bank as depository of funds and as recordkeeper , with records of receipts and expenditures 
to be open to public scrutiny. 

Provisions of the act extend present campaign spending limits to cover all media expenses and require all 
media firms (including television, radio, newspaper, billboard, magazine, advertising, public relations, 
printing, opinion polling, computer, telephone, telegraph) to report the purchase of media services by 
candidates. Media expenses of candidates for the offices of district attorney, clerk of court, register of 



122 



STATE ELECTION (continued) 



probate and insolvency, register of deeds, county commissioner, county treasurer and sheriff are limited to 
$.07 for each resident of the respective electoral district. Other provisions of the act require candidates, 
Upon official announcement or filing of nomination papers, to report all political receipts and expenditures 
since the date of the last general election for the office sought, and count such expenditures toward spend- 
ing limits. The act also limits candidates to one political committee. 

The act establishes a maximum penalty of one year imprisonment and/or $10,000 find for individuals engaged in 
corrupt practices, and a $50,000 fine for corporations so involved. In addition, the Attorney General is 
permitted to bring an action for the removal of a candidate whose election was materially aided by corrupt 
practices on the part of the candidate or one acting in his behalf, where such removal is otherwise authorized 
by 1 aw . 

Yes 2347 
No 1231 
Blanks 1399 

4977 

QUESTION #6 

Should the General Court enact legislation during the nineteen hundred and seventy-five session re- 
organizing state government by creating a Department of Health Systems Regulation which shall have the power 
to administer the medicaid program control and set rates for nursing homes, hospitals, and other health pro- 
viders under medicaid, license and inspect health facilities, and regulate private health insurance policies, 
medical and hospital service plans? 



Yes 2578 
No 1060 
Blanks 1339 

4977 



QUESTION #7 

E. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of alcoholic beverages by restaur- 
ants and function rooms having a seating capacity of not less than one hundred persons? 



Yes 2262 
No 1683 
Blanks 1032 

4977 



QUESTION #8 

"Shall the Senator from this District be instructed to vote to approve a resolution memorializing 
the Congress of the United States in favor of Amnesty for all those who resisted the Vietnam War? 



Yes 1615 
No 2266 
Blanks 1096 

4977 

Ml the totals from the 25 voting machines plus 27 Absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof 
Tiade, as by law is directed, and were for the following, namely: 



".OVERNOR AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 



Sargent and Dwight 2077 

Dukakis and O'Neill 2685 

Gurewitz and Bivens 32 

Kahian and Greco 125 

Blanks 58 



4977 



123 



STATE ELECTION (continued) 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 



Francis X. Bellotti 
Josiah A. Spaulding 
Jeanne Lafferty 
Blanks 



2338 
2455 
74 
110 
4977 



SECRETARY 



Paul H. Guzzi 
John M. Quinlan 
Blanks 



3286 
1463 
228 
4977 



TREASURER 



Robert Q. Crane 
Bl anks 
Others 



3451 
1525 

1 

4977 



AUDITOR 



Thaddeus Buczko 
Bl anks 



3267 
1710 
4977 



CONGRESSMAN - FIFTH DISTRICT 
Paul W. Cronin 
Paul E. Tsongas 
B^ anks 



1588 
3247 
142 
4977 



COUNCILLOR - THIRD DISTRICT 



Herbert L. 
Blanks 



Connolly 



2814 
2163 
4977 



SENATOR - FIFTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 
Ronald C. MacKenzie 
Parker Weaver 
Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - THIRTY SIXTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 



Fred F. 

Blanks 

Others 



Cain 



3491 
408 
1078 
4977 

3868 
1108 

1 

4977 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY - NORTHERN DISTRICT 



John J . 
Bl anks 



Droney 



3240 
1737 
4977 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
John L. Danehy 
Blanks 
Total 



2925 
2052 
4977 



SHERIFF - MIDDLESEX COUNTY 
John J. Buckley 
Walter J. Sullivan 
Bl anks 



2077 
2627 
273 
4977 



^2k 



STATE ELECTION (continued) 



At 5:45 a.m. the Town Clerk read the Warrant. The zero sheets were removed from the twenty-five machines 
and placed outside the railing so that the candidates could look at them before the polls were opened. All 
the election officers were ready with their voting lists and voting machines at five minutes of 6:00 a.m. 
The Town Clerk declared the polls open at 6:00 a.m. and they were closed at 8:00 p.m. There was a waiting 
line in each precinct and the Police Officers in charge did not allow another person to come into the voting 
area until all voters who were there on time had finished voting, this took another half hour before we 
could close the voting machines and take a total tally. Nevertheless the Town Clerk read the results at 
11:00 p.m. There were many angry voters who objected to standing in line so long and some even tore up or 
threw away their voter I.D. cards and walked out. Therefore, the check list was not in agreement with the 
voting machines. 

The within warrant was read by the Town Clerk and at a point where the questions appear, Mr. Stanley Webber 
moved to waive further reading and this was so voted. 

A total of Four thousand nine hundred and seventy-seven (4977) voters were checked in per voting machine 
totals and absentee ballots. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 




A standing vote at the Annual 1974 Town Meeting 




The youngest selectman, Michael Caira, at the Town Meeting conversing 
with the senior and former Selectwoman, Wavie M. Drew. 



125 



Town Accountant 



18 MOmHS 
ANAIYSIS OF CASH ACCOUIW 
January 1, 1973 to June 30, 1971; 



Balance as of January 1, 1973 

Add: Cash Receipts lA/73 to 6/30/71; 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 1/1/73 to 6/30/71; 
Balance on Hand 6/30/71; 



1, 208,016. U9 
31, 1;96. $63.67 
32,70U,580.16 
32.0l;3,270.0Q 
661,310.16 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



Tax Collections ; 

Personal Property, Levy 1972 

1973 
1971; 

Real Estate, Levy 1972 
1973 
1971; 

Betterments Added to Taxes : 
Water Assessments, Levy 1971 

1972 
1973 
1971; 

Street Assessments, Levy 1972 

1973 
1971; 

Water Liens Added to Taxes , 1972 

1973 
1971; 

Tax Titles & Possessions : 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

Sale of Tax Possessions 
Pro -Forma Taxes 
Assessments Paid in Advance ; 

Water 

Street 

Unapportioned Betterments - Paid in full 
Sewer Bettemients 



Short Term Loans ; 

To pay expenditures of Town Departments 
Until Taxes are Collected 

Highway Loans Chapter 8I 
Long Term Loans ; 

Sewer Bonds 



2,119.80 
239,Oi;7.35 
126,362.97 
1U3,010.91; 
7,376,578.16 
3,671,81^7.76 

17.77 
1,281.85 
6,732.30 

9jJ3 

1;23.26 
9,787.53 

QM 

2,U21.37 
15,1;52.35 
36.39 

112,781;. 76 
6,550.00 



7,725.80 
3,810.75 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



367,530.12 
11,191, 1;36.86 

8,01;!. 65 
10,219.67 
17,910 .11 



119,33l;.76 
86.81 



11,536.55 
3,ll;7.05 
7,628.15 



U, 250,000 .00 

22,1;28.00 



11,736,871.73 



1;,272,1;28.00 
26U,000.00 



126 



GEIAOTS AMD GIFTS 



Federal Aid ; 
Schools: 

Federal Employment Act 

National Defense Education 

Reading Skills 

Head Start 

Co-oper. Work Study- 
Bureau of Library Extensions 
Public Grants ; 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Ghp. 8l & 90 
Middlesex County Chapter 90 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Highway Fund, Ghp. #llltO 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
Veterans Services 
Land Taking by the Commonwealth 



School Lunch Program 
State Reimbursements 
Program Receipts 

High School Athletic Assoc. 

Recreation Accounts 

Outside Detail Account 



62,780.00 
13,3hh.hl 

19,i;6l.OO 
10,095.00 
12,083.71; 

60,900.55 
10,070.27 

86,ij.61i.00 
12,826.50 
26,033.22 
706.65 

REVOLVING FUNDS 

230, 286. ii9 
33U. 868 .50 



175,017.71; 



197,001.19 



565,l5i;.99 
l;,ll;9.38 
2,196. Ii5 
21;.852.25 



372,018.93 



596,353.07 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department ; 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water 'Installations 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 
Refunds & Reimbursements (Approp.) 
Refunds, Surplus Revenue 
Recording Fees 
Insurance Dividends 
Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds 
Premium, Sale of Bonds 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Veterans Aid Recoveries 
Water Available Surplus 
Tailings Accoiint 
Sale of Town Owned Land 



Short Term Investments 

Employees Deductions ; 
Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
Retirement System, Town 
Retirement System, Teachers 
Group Insurance, Town 
Group Insurance, Teachers 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
U. S. Savings Bonds 
Tax Sheltered Annuities, Teachers 
Credit Union, All Employees 
Union IXies, All Eki^loyees 

Dog Licenses Collected for County 



ll36,80li.52 
U, 888 .00 
2,865.25 
ll;,7l;7.63 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



1,558, 76i|. 15 
1413,621.71 
162,816.35 
312,012.68 
6,165.81; 
l6,6li|.21 
123,202.98 
13,221.10 
37,120.07 
586,oU6.00 
36,591;. 76 
11,820.75 



23, 271;. 71 



l;59,305.1tO 
32,629.71; 
3,87l;.ll; 
2,6i;3.3l; 
51,700.00 
739.20 
814;.51; 
13,180.00 
I;,l4l2.17 
14;5.97 
3,369.36 
77,350.00 



6,ii7l;,252.58 



673,768.57 



127 



Employee Deductions ; (continued) 

Fish & Game Licenses, Collected for State 

Perpetual Care Funds 

Registry Releases 

Rooney, Special Account 



12,332.50 



35291,733.10 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS (I8 MONTHS) 



Income and Sales Tax ; 
Schools 

Reimbiirsement, Loss of Taxes 
Local Aid, Lottery Fund 
Beano Fund 

Motor Vehicle Excise Collections ; 

Prior Levies 

Current Levies 
Farm Animal Excise, Levy 1973 
Farm Animal Excise, Levy 197ij. 
Sewer Rates 
Ambulance Collections 
Licenses, Liquor 
Interests & Costs ; 
Short Term Investments 
Tax Collections 
Water Demands 

Tax Titles Interest & Costs 
Municipal Receipts ; 
Selectmen 
Tax Collector 
Town Clerk 
Assessors 
Police Dept. 
Building Inspector 

Building Permits 

Wire Permits 

Pl\imbing Permits 

Gas Permits 
Sealer of Wfeights & Measures 
Town Engineer 
Highway Department 

Snow Plowing Reimbvirsements 

Highway Safety Program 

Highway Fund, Chp. 58 

Highway, Sale of Equipment 
Cemetery Department 
Health & Sanitation 

Public Health Nurse 

Licenses & Permits 

Clinics 

Sale of Dogs 
Schools ; 

School Construction Reimb. 
Evening School Tuition 
Special Education Tewksbury 
School Transportation 
Regional Vocation School Rejjnb. 
Regional Vocational School/Maint . 
State Reimb. Tuition & Trans. 
Education of Deaf & Blind 
Bureau of Library Extension 



21,263.00 
6,038.50 
1,637.00 
1.251.50 



1,7U0.00 
995.00 
iiO,399.ii8 
2nM 



i;52.50 
5,760.75 
1,290.00 

528.00 

302, 268. 7U 
819.50 
720 .00 
120,10-7.38 
178,291.07 
2ii,81i7.00 
16,1^96.72 
2,2li3.00 
6,976.32 



1,967,607.66 
1+32.28 
73,57l;.19 
5.902.17 

213,102.07 
1;97.665.70 
1U7.33 
89.00 



81;, 999 .11 
22,14+9.09 
5,230.70 
10,196.05 

776.50 
3,517.1+5 
8,37l+.35 
2.00 
5,868.00 



30,190.00 
727.00 
1+60.00 



1+3,351.89 
12,1+1+2.00 



8,031.25 



9,765,985.68 

1.00 

141.98 



2,01+7,516.30 



710,767.77 

236.33 
100,062.01 
6,861.1+0 

10,000.00 



122,87i+.95 



653,079.73 



128 



Estimated Receipts (continued) 




Library Fines 


2,328.68 


Dog License Reimbursements 


6,386.30 


Widow's Exemptions, Clause 17 


ii,725.00 


Fourth District Court Fines 


2,396.75 


District Court of Lowell 


25.00 


Middlesex House of Correction 


16.00 


Division of Standards 


i;6.00 


State Census Reimbursements 


ii,312.75 


Public Hearings 


202 .00 


Sale of Obsolete Equipment 


68.00 


Rents 


900.00 


Telephone Commissions 


383.32 


Insiarance & W/C Reimbursements 


27,565.98 


Drainlayer' s Permits 


325.00 


Cablevision Fees 


250 .00 


Conservation Commission Hearings 


25.00 



816.775.95 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JANUARY 1, 1973 TO JUNE 30, 197U ^31,h9b,^6J7ET 



18 MONTHS 
DISBURSEMENTS PROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD l/l/7 3-6/30/71; 



Refunds: 

Personal Property Taxes 
Real Estate Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Tax Title Recording Pees 
Water Betterments 
Street Betterments 
Unapportioned Betterments 
Ambulance Account 
Registry Releases 
Suiplus Revenue 
Estimated Receipts 
Water Department: 
Rates 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Liens 

Assessments - State & County 
County Hospital 
County Tax 
County Retirement 
State Recreation 
M. D. C. Sewer 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
M. B. T. A. Transit Authority 
Ipswich River Watershed District 

Temporary Loans: 

Anticipation of Taxes 
Anticipation of Reimbursement 



565.03 
2,233.78 
123.81 

10,673.36 
217,880.73 
207.207.00 
U2,795.U6 
68,692.60 
1,577.10 
525.35 
85U.56 
209, 971. 3U 
U92.97 



1,510.85 
236,332.83 
iU, 127.95 
5M.87 

266.73 
151.28 
623.57 
39.00 

1.00 

89.16 
862.29 



U35,761.09 



321^.909.38 
1|, 250, 000. 00 

58,760.00 



25U,5U6.53 



2,922.62 



760,670.^7 
1+, 308, 760.00 



129 



Water Department: 

Maintenance & Operation 
Develop Salem Street Well Field 
Water Betterments 

Hudson Street 

Lawrence Street 

Royal Street 

Oakwood Road, Reading Avenue, 

Maple Road & Davis Road 
Lake Street 
Pumping Station - Town Park 
Develop Three Well Sites 
Street Betterments: 

Sherwood Road 
Sewer Construction 
Wilmington^ Redevelopment Authority 
Acq\iire Land - School Projects 
Wobum Street School Construction 
Wobum Street School Addition 
Shawsheen Avenue School Construction 
Preliminaiy Plans new High School 
Employee Deductions: 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement - Town Employees 
Teachers 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance - Teachers 
Tax Sheltered Anniiities - Teachers 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield - Town Employees 

Teachers 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

Credit Union 

Union Dues 
Agency Accounts: 

Dog Licenses 

Fish & Game Licenses 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 

Police Training 

Special Account - J. Rooney 

Outside Details 
Premium, Sale of Bonds 
Tailings Account 
Federal Grants & Aids: 

Title VI, Learning Disabilities 

Title II, Library Extensions 

PL #87U» Federal Employment Act 

Consiimer Homemaking 

Head Start 

Saturday Reading 

Title II, Special Grant 

Title I, Reading Skills 
School Lunch 

High School Athletic Assoc. 
Cemetery Department: 

Trust Funds 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Short Term Investments 



U2li,008.86 
26,085.07 



1,86U.76 
877.00 
889.86 

3,723.15 
U»^83.20 



11,937.97 
15,8U7.03 
U.81 

319.10 
228.02 



i,553,7M.U9 
38U,222.70 

153, 177. Ul 

291,0U5.12 
5,912.M 
16,991.10 
33,820.60 
61,092.90 
51,22U.31 
13,221.10 
586,0U6.00 
• 36.599.26 

10,221.35 
11,882.25 
1,906.00 
50.00 
M.98 
21;. 517. 00 



11.27 
6,838.66 

15,255.81; 
13, 680. M 
11,581.87 
27,836.79 
1,065.72 
35.M8.33 



900.00 
120.00 



i+77,883.7U 



51;7.12 
172,14+0.70 

150,052.1;7 

72,18U.1;7 
1,581;. 65 
31;5.60 
5,721.8U 

35,000.00 



3,187,091;.1;0 



1;8, 618.58 

2,326.1;1 

371.00 



111,688.89 

5U2,72l;.63 

3,609.77 



1,020.00 

1;63.92 
7,535,252.58 



Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



S17.675.830.39 



130 



Balance on hand January 1, 1973 

Received 1/1/73 through 6/30/74 
Balance on hand 6/30/7lj. 



18 MONTHS 
TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVENUE SHARING 
January 1, 1973 to Jiine 30, 197ii 



Federal Grants 



$777,037.00 



Interests Rec'd 
on Investments 



62,36l.U2 



Expended 



6$7,02U.l4l 



Balance on 
Hand 

$193,itOO.OO Invested 

kQ .00 Cash In Bank 
193,i4l;8.00 



2^0,000.00 Invested 
125,822.01 Cash In Bank 
$375,822.01 



Expenditures 

Administration 
Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 
Highway Salaries 
Snow & Ice Salaries 
Snow & Ice Expenses 
Town Dump 

Garbage Collection 
Library Salaries 
Library Expenses 
Recreation Salaries 
Bonds & Insurance 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield 



36.75 
199,ii87.l6 
160,709.75 
68,389.ii7 
19,035 .ii3 
16,397. 2'i 
30,000 .00 
16,666.00 
22,860.98 
12,139.13 
23,979.79 
1;6,331.19 
l4Q. 991. It9 
$657,02J4.i4l 



"I certify that this is a true extract 
on the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 
Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



131 



18 MONTHS 
TOWN OF WimiNGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1971; 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Short Term Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected ; 
Prior Levies 

Personal Property, 1972 
Personal Property Taxes 

in Litigation 
Real Estate Taxes, 1971 
Current Levy 

Personal Property, 1973 
Personal Property, 197h 
Real Estate Taxes, 1973 
Real Estate Taxes, 1971; 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes ; 
Prior Levies - 1967 
1968 
1970 
1971 
1972 

Current Levies - 1973 
1971; 

Farm Animal Excise -1971; 
Tax Titles & Possessions ; 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 
Assessments Added to Taxes ; 

Street Assessments: 



Water Assessments: 



Committed Water Interest: 



1972 Street Assessments 
in litigation 
Unapportioned Assessments ; 
Street Assessments 
Water Assessments 
Accounts Receivables ; 
Water Department; 
Rates 

Water Services 
Water Installations 
Commercial & Industrial Fire 

Protection Rates 
Water Liens, 1972 
Water Liens, 1973 



291.20 

1;62.00 
.03 



736.70 
1,295.51 
6U,36l.69 
122,7l;8.8$ 

13.17 
1.90 
1;67.18 
3,792.51 
13,ll;7.1;0 
3i;,U51.0i; 
lUg, 126.06 



1971 


29.50 


1972 


51.36 


1973 


131.92 


1971 


17.72 


1972 


28.76 


1973 


128.61 


1970 


91;. 73 


1971 


9i;.69 


1972 


1;3.33 


1973 


1^8. 72 


1970 


28.38 


1971 


i;0.21 


1972 


10.08 


1973 


139 .8U 



661,310.16 
1,125,000.00 
Uoo.oo 



1,786,710.16 



753.23 



189,11;2.75 



17,1;22.16 
179,577.10 



189,895.98 



69,250.18 
89,l;9l;.83 



196,999.26 
98.38 



158,71;5.01 



1,257.85 
85.61 



.20 

l,Ol;6.l4l 



20,751.70 
U, 617 .15 

27,631;. 78 
7.97 
1,595.91; 

1,600.00 

l,0l|6.6l 



l,3l;3.1;6 



25,368.85 



31,885.30 



132 



ASSETS 



Accounts Receivables ; (continued) 
Sewer Rates 
Highway Department 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 
Ambulance Services 
Veterans Benefits 
Sewer Betterments 
Unprovided for Accounts ; 
Overlay Deficits 
Levy 1970 

1971 

1972 

1973 

1971; 

Tax Title Recording Fees 

Due from Teachers - Union Dues 

Due from - Carter Lect\are Fund 

- Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 
Underestimates - State & County Assessments 

County Tax Assessment, 1973 

Metro. Area Planning Council, 1973 
Loans Authorized, 1973/7U 
Loans Authorized, 197ii/75 
Revenue, \91k/l$ 

TOTAL ASSETS 



155,206.67 
26,i;55.l8 
15,991.91 
6.673.86 



3,103.80 
1,263.79 
5,62ii.60 
lii5,036.05 
l87,liili.66 
75.18 
ii.50 
1;63.92 
69.00 

.01 

97,000.00 
580,150.00 



2,233.95 
97.00 

181,661.85 

22,665.77 
103,009.88 



3ii2,785.50 



6,997.78 

677,150.00 
9, 9U6, 252.25 

$13.673,900.38 




Three State Presidents of their Associations. Left to right: Alan Altman, Presi- 
dent of the City Solicitors' and Town Counsels' Association; Sterling Morris, 
President of the Massachusetts Municipal Management Association; and 
Anthony Krzeminski, President of the Middlesex County Assessors' Associa- 
tion. 



133 



18 MONTHS 
TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1971; 



LIABILiriES & RESERVES 



Taxes Collected in excess ; 

Personal Property - 1971 

Real Estate Tax - 1972 

Motor Vehicle Excise - 196? 

Water Liens - 197li 
Employee Payroll Deductions ; 

State Witholding Taxes 

Retirement Deductions - Town Employees 

Retirement Deductions - Teachers 

Group Insurance Deductions 

Washington Nat'l Insurance - Teachers 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield - Teachers 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield - Town Employees 

Tax Sheltered Annuities - Teachers 
Water Guaranteed Deposits - Water 
Agency Accounts ; 

County Dog Licenses 

Fish & Game Licenses 

Tailings 

Redemption, Assigned Tax Titles 

Cemetery Trust Funds 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Revolv±ng Fujids ; 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Assoc. 

Outside Details - Police Dept. 

Outside Details - Maintenance Dept . 
Group Insurance Dividend 
Highway Fund, Chp. lliiO, Sec. 21 
Federal Grants ; 

Bureau of Library Extensions 

Reading Skills 

Head Start 

Public Law #85/861; 

Public Law #871; 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
Overestimates, State & County Assessments; 

State Recreation Assessment -1973 

M. D. C. Sewer Assessment -1973 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 

M.B.T.A. Assessment -1973 

Ipswich River Watershed Assessment-1973 
Appropriation Balances ; 

Election Expenses 

Board of Registrars 

Town Treasurer 

Town Hall 

Planning Board 

Civil Defense 

Highway Department 
Outlay 
Sidewalks 



.72 

202.81 
26.1|0 



361|.00 
28.7$ 



3,271.00 
17.^28.16 



ii9,689.99 
9,673.03 

li7,708.8o 
$99 .57 
l,li27.8o 

10, 331;. 21; 
l;,92$.6l 



160.2$ 
6,999.53 

iU;.62 
h$0 .00 
3,675.00 

38,1;51.33 
6,151.77 

392.75 



9,339.66 
6,760.67 

8,000.00 
62,1+69.56 
103,1;76.1;2 



6,256.01 
8,176.29 
62.ii7 
36.66 
636.08 

1,133.00 
900.00 
77.21; 
57.00 
6,537.86 
806.68 



20,799.16 



229.93 
36.39 



130,202.59 
6iA.6o 



13,393.85 



U;, 995. 85 
8,307.00 
8l,863.1;8 



190,0l;6.31 
6,1413.25 



15,167.51 



^3k 



18 MONTHS 
LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

Appropriation Balances ; (continued) 
Chapter 90 Construction: 196? 

1968 
1969 
1972 
1973 

Chapter 8I Maintenance: 1973 
Public Street Lights 
Installation of Traffic Lights 
Park Department: 

Expenses 

Outlay 

Cemetery Department - Outlay 
Board of Health - Drug Dependency Problems 
Veterans Benefits - Aid 
School Department: 

Salaries 

Expenses 
School Maintenance: 

Expenses 

Outlay 

Permanent Building Committee - Contractual Services 
Section #3, Alderwood Estates for Conservation 
Historical Preservation, Rotmds Property 
Andover Street 

Cause & Solution, Dirty Water Problems 
1973 Salary Adjustments & Add'tl Costs 
Surveys & Engineering Study-Additional Land Fill Sites 
Acquisition of Land for Sanitary Purposes 
Appollo Park Protective Measures 
Engineering & Title Search, Town owned Land 
Tennis Courts: 

Glen Road School 

Shawsheen Avenue School 

Wildwood Street School 

Wobum Street School 
Installation of Lights - Tennis Courts 

Shawsheen Avenue School 

North Intermediate School 
Completion of Private Enterprise Projects : 
Completion of Dell Drive 
Completion of Marcia Road Subdivision 
Conpletion of Esquire Estates 
Non-Revenue Accounts : 
Acquire Land, School Projects 
Wobum Street School Construction 
Wobiarn Street School Addition 
Shawsheen Avenue School Construction 
Preliminary Plans, New High School 
West Intermediate School Construction 
Wiljnington Memorial Library Construction 
Relocate Shawsheen Avenue Bridge 
Sewer Construction Grants 
Water Betterments: 

Oakwood Rd,, Reading Ave., Maple St., & Davis St. 

Lake Street 
Develop Salem Street Well Field 
Chestnut Street Well Field 



9,000.00 
9,000.00 
9,1450.00 
9,ii50.00 
9,ii50.00 



500.00 
2,i;73.00 



52,67ii.i4l 
ill;, 811 .53 

5,152.95 
1,503.50 



119. Ii2 
381.27 
I1O2.OI 
1,728.91; 

1,216.51 
1,322.38 



1;, 952. 75 
178.80 



1;6,350 .00 
6,5145. i;5 
8,023.142 

15,000.00 



2,973.00 
ii,5oo.oo 

81^.71 
9,750.00 



97,it85.9i; 



6,656.145 
6,815.70 

20,523.89 
1,303.00 
1,1480.314 
7,518.12 
1,350 .00 

27,126.69 

5,550 .00 

2,500.00 

14,896.38 



2,631.614 



2,538.89 

59.71 
98.70 
2,721.28 

2,815.53 

3,339.1.9 
9,156.61 
143,938.114 
13,000.00 
9,7147.22 

U0,l4l0.i4l 
3,000.00 
90,659.30 



5,131.55 
50,270.50 
14,6014.06 



312,675.56 
2,879.69 



135 



Non-Revenue Accoiuits ; (continued) 

Plans for Improvements to System, Water 
Main Street Well Field and Stations 
Construct Permanent Pumping Station, Town Park 
Street Betterments: 

197ij/75 

Ferguson Road 

West Street 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority Acct, 
Revenue Reserved Until Collected ; 
Farm Animal Excise Revenue 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Revenue 
Special Assessments Revenue 
Tax Title Revenue 
Departmental Revenue 
Water Revenue 
Sewer Revenue 

State & County Aid to Highways Revenue 

Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Loans Authorized and Unissued, 1973/71; 
Loans Authorized and Unissued, 197h/7^ 
197V75 Appropriation Control 
Water Available Surplus 
S\arplus Revenue, General 

TOTAL LIABILiriES & RESERVES 



18 MONTHS 
LIABILiriES & RESERVES 



71; .00 

U, 876.68 

2,172.87 



2^,000.00 
2,Ut9.89 
11;,152.97 



98.38 
196,83U.1|6 
129,138.62 
l$8,7l;5.01 
22,762.77 
31,78ii.56 
2,298.30 
188,861.77 
Uoo .00 
97,000.00 
580,150.00 



3214,798.92 
28,791.93 



730,923.87 

677,150.00 
10,ii95,096.50 
30,766.69 
579.519.1|6 

$13,673.900.38 





Wilmington Historian 
Captain Larz Neilson 



Historical Commission in conference with the State Historical Commission. 



136 



18 MONTHS 
COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1973 - 197U TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF THE YEARS 1973 - 197U 





Used by the 


Actual 


Receipts 




Assessors on the 


1973 - 197li 


more than 




1973 - 197U Rate 


Receipts 


estimated 


Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 


651,200.22 


696, 731. U2 


i;5,531.20 


Licenses 


12,000.00 


10,000.00 




Fines 


6,085.87 


2,ii37.75 




Special Assessments 


27,933.93 


13,31it.93 




General Government 


13,91^.62 


12,872.30 




Protection of Persons & Property- 


31,683.75 


37,359.00 


5,675.25 


Health & Sanitation 


7,ii66.ii7 


7,503.25 


36.78 


Highways 


6,017.26 


2,^85.ijl 




School (Local receipts of School Committee) 


6,781.11 


1,539.50 




Libraries (local receipts) 


1,861;. 90 


2,328.68 


i|63.78 


Recreation (State Reimbursement) 


6,ii83.66 






Cemeteries (Other than sale of lots) 


10,1;62.50 


12,U;2.00 


1,979.50 


Interests 


56,689.17 


122,776.17 


66,087.00 


Farm Animal Excise 


119.79 


236.33 


116 .5ii 


Ambulance Services 


5,It06.37 


6,822.1;0 


1,1^6.03 


Sewer Revenue 


56,200.17 


100,062.01 


143,861. 81; 


Miscellaneous Receipts 


U, 829. 01 


2,878.32 




Surplus Revenue (late receipts) 


33,329.9ii 






State Receipts (Cherry Sheet) 


2,736,963.87 


2,703,781.53 




Workmens' Comp. & Insurance Reimbursement 




27,565.98 


27,565.98 


Dog License Reimbursement 




6,386.30 


6,386.30 


State Census Reimbursement 




ii,312.75 


1;, 312. 75 




3,675,i|61.61 


3,773,«36.03 


203,1432.95 



Receipts 
less than 
estimated 



2,000.00 
3,6148.12 
114,619.00 
1,071.32 



3,531.85 
5,2la.6l 

6,1483.66 



1,950.69 
33,329.914 
33,182.314 



105,058.53 



137 



18 MONTHS 

REPORT OF DEPARTMEIfrAL EXPEItDITURES FOR 1973-197U 



Oi^ 1 >riL> J.1 1 Pill 




LKJnVi 1 n PiH 1^1 1 n Pin 




ua,±3J. ±cS 




OdXaXy Hfitni ri 1 K 1. r H 1. 1 vt^ iioo I/. 


1 R Q I , on 


SrLXllbXIi^ iiU-V • OC JjXIlLL±Iig 


P 9QR )i7 






Misc. Services 


3,850.07 


Repairs & Maintenance 


19.% 


Town Meeting Expenses 


1,981.13 


Misc. Services 


388.26 


Supplies Office 




Supplies Other 




uuTiiay 


L , cXA) . UU 


Tax Title Foreclosures 


1,730.09 








iC (^r>C I.I. 
3p,636.i44 


i!jiil!jL.TiUJNb 




TUWJN l/ULUliUTUll 




Salaries 


6,501.09 


Salary Town Collector 


16 ,01o . 32 


Printing Adv. & Binding 


14^. UU 


Salaries Other 


Id. , lU^i . 94 


Misc. Services 


276.39 


Printing Adv. & Binding 


360.56 


Supplies Office 


593-26 


Misc. Services 


626.03 


Outlay 


1 9 lOU .UU 


bupplies Uiiice 


n I on r\i 
1 ,4^1 .(jX 


Voting Machines 


7,328.25 


Data Processing Bills 


2,lo2. 72 




16 ,021 . 79 


Outlay 


110. u5 








^o Q 00 00 

32,030.03 


iJUAHD OF KhiG-lbTRAHb 








Salaries 


7,232.02 


rn niT **i t i i i \ tt" 

TOWN CLERK 




Misc. Contr. Services 


oc'o 1 1 . 

2,3P'^'l4 


baiary Town OlerK; 


iOjUio . 32 


Printing Adv. & Binding 


1 , i466 . 6 / 


Salaries Other 


12,220.02 


Supplies Office 


29i4.'01 


Printing Adv. & Binding 


72.95 




ll,3Ul+.oU 


Misc. Services 


IOI+.75 






Supplies uiiice 










28,827.61+ 


PINAITCE COMMITTEE 








Salaries 


694. dx> 






Printing Adv. & Binding 


d, [ .00 


AbbilibbUKb 




Misc. Contr. Services 


63pop 


Salary Principal Assessor 


iii: , 096 . ID 


Supplies Office 


fit? Tft 


Salaries Other 


-1-6, i+f ( •'^6 






Misc. Services 


4,030.09 






buppiies uiiice 


1 1.1 ft <7 

1 , 4-1- 0.01 








1+5,631.00 


TOWN MANAGER 








Salary Town Manager 


34, oil .02 






balaries Other 


i3,<i6o.30 


TOWN COUNbJiL 




Printing Adv. & Binding 


212 .00 


Personal Services 


14,995-00 


Misc. Services 


027 . o2 


Contr. Services 


11,250.00 


Supplies 


6O0. 05 




26 , 2i+5 • 00 




i+9,727.99 










TOWN HALL 




COMMOTITY & ECONOMICAL DEVELOmENT 




Salaries 


13,779.60 


Salaries 


2,380.00 


Misc. Contr. Services 


6,131.79 


Printing Adv. & Binding 


2, 891. 6i| 


Postage 


6,677.10 


Misc. Services 


3,353.18 


Supplies Office 


1,707.01 




8,6214.82 


Lata Processing Payrolls 


6,01U.75 








3i+,3i0.25 


TOWN ACCOITNTANT 








Salary Town Accountant 


21,207.12 


PLANNING BOARD 




Salaries Other 


12,581+. 21+ 


Salaries 


i+,27l+.5l 


Misc. Services 


106.53 


Misc. Services 


2,926.96 


Supplies Office 


608.19 


Supplies Office 


878.56 




3U,506.08 


Professional Services 


8,060.00 








16,11+0.03 



138 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



baiaxy (jniei 


Jt-tO fU.DD 


Salsiry LieutenaJit 


C.L 9 D£:D . yo 


Salaxy Sergeants 


-LUU J U ( D ♦ 


Salary Patrolmen 


375,317.39 


Salary Traffic Super. 




Salary Clerk 


13,035.144 


Salary Extra Help 


36,325.86 


Salary Vacations 


3l,82l|.lO 


Salary Sick Leave 


29,U02.25 


Salary Paid Holidays 


19,008.U2 


Salary Police Dog Officer 


1,200.00 


Subsc. Dues & Misc. Services 


1,157.08 


Maint. of Dogs 


1,506.81 


Clothing & Rubber Goods 


10,799.50 


Supplies Office 


3,102.08 


Small Tools & Equipment 


U,853.8i 


Outlay 


6,680.00 




7i;2, 170. 65 



FIRE DEPARTMEIW 
Salary Chief 
Salary Deputy Chief 
Salaries Lieutenants 
Salaries Privates 
Salaries Call Fire & Ambulance 
Salaries Vacations 
Salaries Sick Leave 
Salaries Paid Holidays 
Repairs Radio 
Misc. Services 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay & Fire Alarm Ext. 



CIVIL DEFEITSE 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Utilities 
Transportation 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 



CONSTABLE 



DOG OFFICER 
Salaries 
Misc. Seivices 



31,872.09 
20,1+98.00 
72,708.26 
362,658.81+ 
ll+,639-91 
30,073.68 
19,811.21 
17,529.80 
315. U5 
i,3iU.03 
6,1001.^3 
298. U6 
1,730.00 
5.720.00 
585,611+. 16 



1,500.00 
537.01 
261.1+6 
28I+.50 
1+8.09 
111.80 

2,71+2.86 



100.00 



5,751.90 

2 ,532.7 5 
8,281+. 65 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Salary Building Inspector 
Salciries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 



BOARD OF APPEALS 
Salaries 
Supplies Office 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 



SEATiKR OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
Salary 

Small Tools & Equipment 



TOWN ENGINEER 

Salary Town Engineer 

Salaries Other 

Misc. Contr. Services 

Supplies Office 

Small Tools & Equipment 

Outlay 



HIGHWAY 

Salary Superintendent 
Salaries & Wages Other 
Repairs Police Vehicles 
Repairs & Maint. Fire Dept. 
Misc. Repairs - 
Repairs & Maint 
Repairs & Maint 
Repairs & Maint 
Repairs & Maint 
Misc. Contr. Serv. 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 



Engineering Dept. 
Tree Dept. 
Dutch Elm Control 
Oypsy Moth Control 
Cemetery Dept. 



Gasoline & Oil - Police 

Gasoline & Oil - Fire 

Gasoline & Oil - Town Engr. 

Gasoline & Oil - Tree Warden 

Gasoline & Oil - Gypsy Moth Control 

Gasoline & Oil - Cemetery 

Gasoline & Oil - School Maint. 

Supplies Construction 

Supplies Office 

Sm. Tools & Equipment 

Outlay 

Sidewalks 

Drainage 



17,795.20 
12,032.19 
198.50 
325.50 
2,396.86 
608.37 
33,356.62 



985.I4I4 
293.76 
28.00 
28.91 
1,336.11 



1,937.1+8 
2k68 

1,972.16 



13,730.91 

ia,38i.ii+ 

6,5U3.71 
1,21+2.73 
1,221.73 
2,201+. 63 
66,321+. 85 



23,110.21+ 
22l+,170.39 
12,695.36 
7,257.71+ 
321.95 
978.15 
71+6.29 
259.67 
l+,806.57 
9,638.71 
117.85 
22,139.91+ 
3,758.98 
21+9.11 
735.16 
31+8.00 
595.09 
l,39i+.29 

la, 173. 1+6 

111.09 
26,717.37 
7,009.00 
1+9,906.33 
29,007.95 
li67,2i|8.69 



139 



ROAD MACHINERY 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Gasoline & Oil 
Outlay Trucks 



27,266.21 
19,2i|2.5l; 

57,868.25 



GYPSY MOTH COMTROL 
Salaries 
Chemicals 

Sm. Tools & Equipment 



15,681.00 
2,618.81 

18,1+85.21 



CHAPTER 90 CONSTRUCTION I966 
Construction 



3,632.98 



POBLIC STREET LIGHTS 



85,535.23 



CHAPTER 90 CONSTRUCTION 1970 
Supplies, Construction 



CHAPTER 90 CONSTRUCTION 1971 
Supplies, Construction 



CHAPTER 90 MAINTENANCE 
Expenses 



CHAPTER 81 
Salaries 

Supplies, Construction 



2,181.11 



8,812.77 



6,500.00 



18,11+3.15 
23,739.UO 
1+1,882.55 



PARK DEPARTMENT 
Salaries 

Maintenance & Supplies 
Outlay 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Salary Superintendent 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Liners 

Supplies Care of Grovmds 
Supplies Construction 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay, Equipment 



5,9U7.80 
881;.68 
1>995.07 
8,827.55 



17,2514.29 
67,397.2U 
20,508.19 
1,692.50 
3,166.01 
2,523.36 
159.72 
I497.96 
1^159.60 
11U,358.87 



SNOW & ICE CONTROL 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Gasoline & Oil 
Salt & Sand 

Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay, Equipment 



TREE WARDEN 
Salaries 
Dues , Subsc 
Chemicals 
Trees 

Sm. Tools & Equipment 
Outlay 



DUTCH ELM CONTROL 
Salaries 
Chemicals 

Sm. Tools & Equipment 



& Misc. Services 



71,377.1+3 
7,1+55.78 
23,969.71 
U, 660. 25 
1+0,298.89 
9ia.8l 
5,953.00 
l51+,656.87 



27,1+90.19 
1,008.13 

l+,695.05 
i+,991.00 
8I+9.22 
1.239.95 
1+0,273.51+ 



20,682.00 
3,i+3i.25 
382. 81+ 
2l+,l+96.09 



WATER DEPARTMENT 
Salaries & Wages 
Repairs & Maintenance 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Public Utilities 
Transportation 
Gasoline & Oil 
Meters & Meter Parts 
Pipes & Fittings 
Supplies Construction 
Supplies Office 
Supplies Plant 
Outlay, Eqxiipment 



BOARD OF HEALTH 
Salary Director 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Clinic Expenses 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay, Office Equipment 
Hospital & Medical 
Drug Dependency Problem 
Mental Health 
Garbage Collection 
Town Dump 



198,376.77 
11+,510.18 
71,368.28 
63,1+31.1+6 
886.00 
9,378.28 
8,086.1+1+ 
37,220.1+8 
3,1+88.11 
7,993.52 
1+, 1+63. 61 
2,998.66 
1+22,201.79 



21,973.32 
1+1,1+11.07 
397.50 
1,691+. 10 

389.75 
1+80.61 
86.16 
1,331.90 
ll+,73i+.29 
17,357.90 
57,582.6U 
87.U99.96 
2l+l+,939.20 



11+0 



VETERMS SERVICES 
Salary Agent 
Salary Other 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 
Veterans Aid 



3,510.00 
8,622.25 
35.00 
236.67 
9U.86 
98,662.29 
111,161.07 



FTOLIC LIBRARY 
Salary Director 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Services 
Programs & Activities 
Supplies , Library 
Supplies, Office 
Outlay 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 
Salairies 
Expenses 



VOCATIOITAL TRAIMING 
Tuition 
Transportation 



6,783,410.70 
1.36U,662.70 
8,1U8,073.U0 



7,616.00 
586.25 
8,202.25 



RECREATION 

Salary Director 

Salaries Other 

Council on Aging 

Misc Services 

Community Youth Programs 

Supplies Office 

Supplies , Playground & Beach 



SCHOOL MAINTENANCE 

Salary Superintendent 

Salaries Other 

Repairs & Maintenance 

Misc. Contr. Services 

Vandalism 

Rubbish 

Uniforms 

Kitchen Repairs 

Fuel Heating 

Oil Burner Repairs 

Supplies Plant 

Small Tools & Equipment 

Roof Repairs 

Outlay 



21,351.61+ 
63U,876.63 
27,268.95 
25,767.66 
13,275.60 
12,607.95 
9,386.69 
5,121.31 
167,319-53 
111, 215. 52 
33,5iUt.50 
538.92 
2ii,8U7.05 
iUi,82l.58 

l,03U,9U3.53 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Salaries 
Contr. Services 



CONSERVATION COMMITTEE 
Salaries 

Dues & Subscriptions 

Engineering Services 

Jr. Conservation Camp 

Trees & Shrubs 

Supplies Office 

Misc. Materials 

Pur. Land & Land Improvement 

Outlay 



SCHOOL GROUNDS MAINTENANCE 
Repairs & Maintenance 
Supplies, Care of Grounds 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay 



MAINTENANCE OF TOWN BUILDINGS 
Repairs & Maintenance 
Public Utilities 
Outlay 



3,5i+3-29 
9,3ll|.87 
203. 9U 
9,691.58 
22,753.68 



8,814.37 
73,873.21 

9,457-51 
92,172.09 



UNCLASSIFIED 
Reserve Fund 
Bonds & Insurance 
Sewer Maintenance 
Town Report 
Local Transportation: 

Selectmen 

Town Acco\intant 

Town TreasTirer 

Town Collector 

Planning Board 

Police Chief 

Police Trf. Super. 

Dog Officer 

Building Inspector 

Cemetery 

Board of Health 

Ernest Romano 

Anne Butters 

Abbie McQuaid 



20,067.56 

85,415 10 
629.93 
465.00 
48,553.69 
10,020.38 
9,053.00 
174, 204.66 



18,274.37 
78,535.10 
86.78 
9,994.50 
17,450.02 
1,107.06 
13,541.64 
138,989.47 



18,184.30 
20,702.05 



1,262.52 
385.25 
192.00 
300.00 
575.91 
194.45 
928.50 

2,525.50 
335.01 

6,699.14 



40,570.26 
143,245.05 
1,466.50 
4,377.28 

750.00 
84.70 
77.20 
66.80 
225.60 
900.00 
240.00 
1,468.30 
1,409.38 
706.60 
162.50 
1,177.64 
1,197.16 
656.93 



141 



UNCLASSIFIED (continued) 

Local Transportation (continued) 
Veterans Agent 
Public Bldg. 
Misc. 

Recreation 
Library 
Training & Conf . In State 
Finance Committee 
Town Accoimtant 
Town Treas\irer 
Town Collector 
Town Clerk 
Assessors 
Planning & MAPC 
Police Department 
Fire Department 
Building Inspector 
Tree Department 
Board of Health 
VeteraxLS Agent 
Public Buildings 
Library- 
Recreation 
Misc. 

Training & Conf. Out of State 

Town Clerk 

Assessors 

Public Buildings 

Library 

Misc. 
Lease of Q;uarters 
Historical Commission 
Blue Cross & Insurance 
Memorial Day & Veteran's Day 
Section 3 Alderwood Est. Cons. 
Hist. Preserv. Rounds Prop. 
Comprehensive Professional Audit & 

Analy. Tn. Accounting Records 
Appraisals 

Cause & Solution Dirty Water Prob . 

in Water System, Specific areas 
Outlay Police Cruiser 
Outlay Police Cruisers 
Outlay Rescue Truck & Equip. 
Outlay Highway Dept. 

U Ihamp Trucks, Sm. Tractor 
Outlay Public Buildings 

2 Econoline Vans-Floodlights 

Boutwell School 
Regional Vocational School 

Dist. Comm. 
Salary Adj. & Addl. Costs - 1973 
Addl. Employees Public Bldgs. 
Addl. Employees Library 
Addl. Employees Town Hall 
Addl Employees Engineering 
Addl. Employees Police 
Police Dept. Career Incentive Pay 
Local Distb. Federal Surplus Foods 



866.30 

1,58U.90 
13.80 
380.70 
127.80 

110.00 
128.10 
62.50 
7i|.60 
157.32 
758.68 
3U9.65 
1,504.90 
690.81 
8U.00 
67.00 
323.05 
i+71.67 
324.50 
2iA.09 

162.37 
1,504.35 

82.00 
550.00 
300.00 
117.75 
351.50 
1,500.00 
788.41 
111,864.81 
3,488.58 
29,476.11 
43,697.00 

4,000.00 
4,115.00 

3,881.88 
3,289.60 
30,000.00 
20,135.66 

43,833.95 
6,043.80 



357,653.00 
95,247.28 
8,920.36 
19,412.00 
5,568.00 
10,816.00 
400.00 
4,250.00 
4,033.08 



Surveys & Engr. Studies/Addl. 

Sanitary Land Pill Sites 
Veterans ' Retirement 
1970 Excise Tax Refund Acct. 
Data Processing Payrolls 



MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 
Schools 

General Government 

Water 

Sewer 

Interest on Antic Notes & Fees 



2,893.49 
22,027.64 
91.50- 
2.000.00 
1,049,598.39 



831,126.80 
160,551.61 
142,957.00 
78,922.00 
74,777-66 
1,288,335.07 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTS 

Acq. Land for School Projects, 

Salem Street 
Wobum Street School 
Wobuxn Street Addition 
Shawsheen Avenue School 
Preliminary Plans new High School 
Sewer Construction Grants 
Water Betterments - Hudson St. 

Lawrence Street 
Water Betterment I969 Royal Street 
Water Betterment 1972- 

Oakwood Rd. -Reading Ave.; 

Maple Rd. -Davis Rd. 
Develop Salem St. Well Field 
Water Betterment I973 - Lak;e St. 
Aldrich Rd. Well Site 
Construct Perm. Pumping Station 

Town Park Well Field 
Street Betterments 1974-1975 
Develop Three Well Sites 
Wilm. Redevelopment Authority 
Street Betterment 1972 Article 38 

Sherwood Rd. 
Tennis Courts Glen Road School 
Tennis Courts Shawsheen Ave. School 
Tennis Courts Wildwood Street School 
Tennis Courts Wobum Street School 



72,184.47 
1,584.65 
345.60 
5,721.84 
35,000.00 
172,440.70 
1,864.76 
877.00 
889.86 



3,723.15 
26,085.07 

4,583.20 

50.00 

15,847.03 
319.10 
4.81 
150,052.47 

228.02 
12,655.58 
10.56 
15,597-99 
11,771.06 
531,836.92 



142 



18 MONTHS 
ANALYSIS OF THE MATDRIITG DKBT 





Balances 


Added 


Paid-Off 


Balances 




12/31/72 


1973/7ii 


1973/71+ 


6/1/71+ 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 










Elementary School Loan, Wildwood School 


25,000 




25,000 


-0- 


G/L Uh, Sec. 10, $$12,000 










Street Construction Bonds (1970 ) 


7,000 




7,000 


-0- 


G/L kk, Sec. 10, $21,8$0 










Wilmington Memorial Library 


385,000 




50,000 


335,000 


G/L kk, Sec. 10, $1485,000 










Nichols Street Bridge Loan 


8,600 




7,500 


1,100 


G/L hh. Sec 7, $31,600 










West Street Construction Bonds 


21,500 




7,300 


ll+,200 


G/L Sec. 10, $35,100 










Sewer Main Bonds (l97l) 


260,000 




30,000 


230,000 


G/L kh. Sec. 8, $275,000 










Sewer Main Bonds (1973) 




261+,000 


19,000 


2111^.000 


G/L ki;, Sec. 8, $26Ll,000 










Street Construction Bonds (I971) 


51.60L 




25,802 


25,802 


G/L iili. Sec. 10, $6ii,505 










Urban Renewal Bonds (1971) 


180,000 




20 .000 


160.000 


G/L 121B, Sec. 20 $200,000 










Acquire Land School Purposes (1972) 


61 , 800 




12,360 


liQ.liliO 


G/L Uk, Sec. 10, $61,800 












1,000,501+ 


261+, 000 


20^.Q62 


1.060.1^112 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 










Add. & Alter. Jr/Sr. High School 


170,000 




70 , 000 


100.000 


Acts 6ii5/ii8, $1,375,000 










Add. & Alter. Jr/Sr. High School 


120,000 




1+0,000 


80,000 


Acts 61+5 A8, $14.00,000 










Glen Road School 


100,000 




20,000 


80,000 


Acts 6U5A8, $U5o,ooo 










Boutwell Street School 


11+0,000 




20,000 


120,000 


Acts 6U5A8, $1|00,000 










North Intermediate School 


1+1+0,000 




55,000 


385,000 


Acts 6U5A8, $1,050,000 










Various School Projects 


18,000 




5,000 


13,000 


Acts 6U5A8, $68,1+25 










Wobum Street School 


322,000 




30,000 


292,000 


Acts 6i+5A8, $597,000 










Wobixm Street School Addition 


1+85,000 




70,000 


1+15,000 


Acts 61+5 A8, $660,000 










West Intermediate School 


920,000 




150,000 


770,000 


Acts 61+5 A8, $1,1+1+5,000 










Shawsheen Avenue School 


1,210,000 




110,000 


1,100,000 


Acts 61+5 A8, $1,671+, 720 










Shawsheen Avenue School (2nd Issue) 


80,000 




20,000 


60,000 


Acts 61+5 A8, $100,000 










Water Standpipe Bonds 


10,000 




10,000 


-0- 


Chp. 1+1+, Sec. 8, $152,000 










Water Main Bonds (I962) 


25,000 




5,000 


20,000 


Chp. Uk, Sec. 8, $86,000 










Water Main Bonds , New Well Field 


21+0,000 




30,000 


210,000 


Chp. 1+1+, Sec. 8, $1+63,529 










Salem Street Well Field 


22,700 




11,350 


11,350 


Chp. 1+1+, Sec. 8, $56,750 










Salem Street Well Field & Mains 


270,000 




50,000 


220,000 


Chp. i+l+, Sec. 8, $320,000 










U, 572, 700 


-0- 


696,350 


3,876,350 


COMBINED TOTALS 


5,573,204 


261+,000 


900,312 


U,936,892 



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Special Civic Events 




Reverend Francis Mackin Day at St. Thomas Church Wilmington Redevelopment Authority signing the agreement to sell 

Eames Street industrial land to Jewell Manufacturing Company. 






FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



32 Bout>A«ll School 

33 Buzzell School 

36 Center School 

37 Glen Rd School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 North Intermediate 

School 

43 West School 

44 Svvain School 

46 Walker School 

47 West Intermediate School 

48 West School 

49 Shawsheen School 
51 Whitefleld School 

53 Wlldvwood School 

54 Woburn Street School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 M(«ln & Middlesex Ave 
1222 Carr Fastener 

123 Mam & Clark Sts. 

1 24 Washington Ave 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Mam St & Bridge Lane 

127 Brand Ave & Wiser St 

128 Baker St & Taplin Ave 

129 Phillips Ave & Wiser St 

131 Hobson Ave & Miles St 

132 Main St & 

Massachusetts Ave 

1 33 Massachuset ts Ave & 

River St 

134 Mam & Harnden Sts 

1 35 St Dorothy s Church 

136 Veranda Ave 

137 Main St & Grove Ave 

138 Grove & Wild Aves 

139 Grove Ave & Burnap St 

141 Grove Ave & Lake St 

142 Main St & Glen Rd 

143 Main & Lake Sts 

144 Lake St & Warren Rd 

146 Main & Davis Sts 

147 Fairfield Ave 

148 Marjorie Rd 

149 Main St at Tewksbury 

Line T 

21 1 Burlington & Floradale 

Aves 

21 1 1 Diamond Crystal Salt 

Company 

21 12 Sweetheart Plastic Corp 

212 Burlington Ave & 

Harris St 

213 Cedar St & Burt Rd 

214 Deming Way lOld Age 

Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave & 

Chestnut St 

216 Chestnut St & 

Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St & Mill Rd 

218 Chestnut St & 

Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 

Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St near 

Golf Club 

222 Chestnut St. at Woburn 

Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts 

225 Marion St to 

Chestnut St 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave. & 

Boutwell St 

228 Boutwell St & Taft Rd. 

229 Taft & Swam Rds. 

231 Roosevelt Rd 

232 Burlington Ave. & 

Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave. & 

Swain Rd. 

234 Beech St. 



235 Burlington Ave. & 

Forart St 

236 Burlington Ave at 

Burlington Line 

237 Forest St. & Congress St. 

238 Forest St & 

Randolph Rd 

239 Forest St & 

Cochrane Rd 

241 Elwood Rd 

242 Forest St & 

Edwards Rd 

251 Shawsheen Ave & 

Canal St 

252 Caial St. & Burt Rd 

253 Grand St. 

254 Nassau Ave & 

Dunton Rd 

255 Shawsheen Ave & 

Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 

Norfolk St 

257 Amherst Rd 

258 Auburn Ave 

259 Ferguson Rd 

261 Shawsheen Ave & 

Aldrich Rd 

262 Aldrich Rd & 

Hardin St 

263 Aldrich Rd & 

Kendall St 

264 Aldrich Rd & 

Boutwell St 

265 Aldrich Rd & Forest St 

266 Winston Ave 

267 Aldrich Rd at 

Bilierica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave near 

Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave & 
Bond St 

273 Shawsheen Ave & 

Hopkins St 

274 Hopkins & Columbia 

Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 

Streets 

276 Hopkins St at 

Billerica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave & 

Nichols St 

278 Nichols St & 

Fairmeadow Rd. 

279 Fairmeadow & 

Jere Rds 

281 Nichols St at 

Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave. at 

Billerica Line 

31 1 Main St & Dublin Ave 

312 Main & Lowell Sts 
3121 Hayden Mica Co 

313 Mam St & Butters Row 

314 Main St. at Town Park 
3142 Brewsters 

315 Main & Eames Sts 

316 Eames St, 

3132 Polyvinyl Chemical 

3161 J.W Gi'eer Co 

3162 National Polychemical 

Co , Inc. 

3163 Dragon Cement Co. 

3164 Raffi & Swanson Inc 

317 Cook Ave 

318 Main St. at Woburn Line 

321 Lowell & Parker Sts. 
3211 Parker & Laurel St. 

322 Parker & Blackstone Sts. 
3223 Allen Park Drive 

3222 Allen Park & Sheldon St. 

323 Lowell & Cross Sis. 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 
3241 Avco Corp. 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts. 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts. 



327 Woburn St & 

Brentwood Ave. 

328 Woburn St & 

Morse Ave. 

329 Woburn & Eames Sts. 

3291 Terrell Corp. 

3292 Int. Salt 

3293 NAPA 

3294 Ritter Trucking 
3295 Nova Devices 

331 Woburn St & 

Industrial Way 
3313 Commodity Warehouse 

3314 Market Forge 

3315 Smithcraft 

3316 Crusader Paper Co. 

332 Strout Ave 

333 Lowell St & 

Woodland Rd. 

334 Lowell & West Sts 

335 West St & Westdale 

Avenue 

336 Ayone St 8i Crest 

Avenue 

337 Nickerson Ave 

338 West St & 

Suncrest Ave 

339 Suncrest Ave & 

Meadow Lane 
341 West St & Industrial Way 
3412 Compugraphics 
341 3 Scully Signal 
3415 Ling Electronics 

341 7 Instar & Alden 

342 Lowell St , Rte 93 

and Reading Line 

41 1 Church St , Fire Station 

412 Church & Columbia Sts 

413 Church & Beacon Sts 

414 Beacon St & 

Belmont Ave. 

415 State St & 

Fairview Ave. 

416 Church & Clark Sts 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St & 

Thurston Ave 

419 Church & Adams Sts 

421 Chandler & Kelley Rds 

422 Adams St Ext 

423 Church St & 

Middlesex Ave 

4231 New Library 

4232 Baptist Church 

424 Middlesex Ave & 

Adelaide St 

425 Middlesex Ave & 

Clark St 

426 Clark St & 

Railroad Ave 

427 Middlesex Ave & 

Adams St 

428 St Thomas' Church 

429 Middlesex Ave. & 

School St 

431 School St & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane & Loumac Rd. 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave & 

Wildwood St 

435 Wildwood St near 

Cemetery 

436 Wildwood St near 

Vets Housing 

437 Wildwood & Woburn 

Streets 

438 Wing Rd 

51 1 Middlesex Ave & 

Glen Rd 

512 Glendale Circle 

513 Glen Rd & 

Lawrence St. 

514 Lawtvnce St & 
Lawrence Ct. 



515 Lawrence St. ft 

Hamlin Lan* 

516 Glen Rd at 

R R. Crossing 

517 Glen Rd. & Fay St. 

518 Glen Rd ft KingSt. 

519 King St ft Garden 

Ave. 

521 King & Kilby Sts. 

522 King & Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd. & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd. & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. & Harnden St. 

526 Glen & Miller Rds. 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 

Aves 

528 Faulkner & Allston 

Aves. 

529 Jones Ave 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave & 

Federal St. 

534 Federal & Concord Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts 

536 Federal & Wilson Sts. 

537 Federal & Lincoln Sts 

538 Federal & Pershing Sts 

539 Federal & Library Sts 
541 Federal & Woburn Sts 
54 2 Woburn & West Sts. 
543 West & Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St at 

R R Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts 
5461 Photon 

547 Concord St at Rte 93 

5471 Compugraphics, Concord St 

5472 Dynamics Research 
5475 Volkswagen 

5478 Machinist for 
Electronics 

5479 Barbo 

548 Concord St at North 

Reading Line 

549 Woburn St at 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 

Aves 

551 1 Avco. North Wilmington 

5512 Photon. Inc 

5513 D F Munroe Paper Co. 

5514 Waltham Door & 

Window Co 

552 Middlesex Ave & Shady 

Lane Drive 
5521 Mytron Inc 

553 Shady Lane Drive & 

Oakdale Rd 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 

Birchwood Rd. 

555 Shady Lane Drive & 

Sprucewood Rd. 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 

Roads 

557 Birchwood & Judith Rds. 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 

Lawrence St 

61 1 No. Wilmington 

Shopping Center 
61 2 Middlesex Ave. & 

North St 

613 North St & 

Pineridge Rd. 

614 North St. & Marcia Rd 

615 Middlesex Ave & 

High St 

616 Linda & Carolyn Rds. 

617 High & Woburn Sts. 

618 Woburn ft Park Sts. 

619 Park St & Gowing Rd. 

621 Gowing & Marcus Rds. 

622 Park St. at No. Reading 

Line 



623 Middlesax Ave ft 

Salem St 

624 Arlena & Catherine 

Aves. 

625 Barbara & Dorothy 

Aves. 

626 Salem St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunningham 

Streets 

628 Salem St & 

McDonald Rd 

629 McDonald Rd. to End 

631 Royal St 

632 Salem St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

633 Salem & Ballardvale 

Streets 

634 Ballardvale St. at 

Rte. 125 

635 Ballardvale St. st 

No 21 1 
5351 Charles River Breeding 
Laboratories 

636 Ballardvale St at 

No 326 

637 Ballardvale St at Andover 

Line 

638 Salem St. at Rte 93 

639 Salem & Woburn Sts 

641 Woburn St & 

Hathaway Rd 

642 Hawthorne Rd 

643 Hathaway & 

Sheridan Rds 

644 Hathaway & Gunderson 

Roads 

645 Salem St & Thrush Rd. 

646 Thrush Rd & 

Marie Drive 

647 Salem St at North 

Reading Line 

6471 Cronin s Pit 

6472 Benevento's Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 

Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 

(Water Dept.) 

6482 AInsworth Road 

6483 Highway Dept 

649 Andover St. & Rte 125 

651 Andover St at No. 319 

652 Andover St at Andover 

Line 



SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a m & 

9 p m ) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 
22 No School (6 30 a m., 
7 00 a m. I 

2 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box - second alarm 

3 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box general alarm 

MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 
8 Out of Town 

81 To ArxJover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



FIRE - AMBULANCE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3200 

658-3346 



POLICE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3331 

658-5071 
658-5072 
935-5966 



TOWN HALL 

658-3311 
935-5596 



TOWN HALL ANNEX 
657-7511 

NO SCHOOL 658 9845 



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^^^art^^i '/^^i f^i- A^e^/^ iC^jfyM *-A(>e^c/r/f y^ C^Tm^ t^. 



The Wilmington Resolves, written in 1773, and adopted by the 
Town Meeting, are an extraordinary document on Civil Rights, 
written three years before the Declaration of Independence, and 
signed by the then Town Clerk, Cadawallader Ford Jr. 

The resolves were probably written by the Rev. Isaac Morrill, 
pastor of the Wilmington Church of Christ. The Town Clerk, his son- 
in-law, signed them with letters which are mindful of the later 
flourish of John Hancock and the Declaration of Independence. 

Cadwallader Ford Jr., was the Captain of the Wilmington Com- 
pany of Minutemen, on Concord Day, and led the Wilmington troops 
in battle at Meriam's Comer. 



^own Printina Jtt